Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 177
Like Tree255Likes

Miscellaneous

Random topics from random people!

Thread: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

  1. #21
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Desdichado View Post
    The truly abysmal Scrooge was Kelsey Grammar. I like most of his work, but that was an epic fail.
    I did see that one, I remembered being disappointed. I don't know if they changed important parts of the story, or what the problem was. But I remember it wasn't very good.
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

  2. #22
    Senior Member Desdichado's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 9th, 2014
    Age
    26
    Posts
    5,497
    Rep Power
    51

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    I remember it just being super kitschy. And the music was awful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    I did see that one, I remembered being disappointed. I don't know if they changed important parts of the story, or what the problem was. But I remember it wasn't very good.
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Nihil novi sub sole.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Desdichado View Post
    I wonder how influenced Dickens was by Edmund Burke, because that is a very Burkean way of viewing such legislation.
    I don't know, I'm not really familiar with politics. It seems like Dickens was always against legislation that would oppress the poor further. Was it Burke that said the only way evil can triumph is for good men to do nothing? I DO know about Lord Ashley, and his crusades to improve the lives of the poor through legislation. A really good Christian role model.
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

  4. #24
    Senior Member Desdichado's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 9th, 2014
    Age
    26
    Posts
    5,497
    Rep Power
    51

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    I know little of Lord Ashley. I'll need to read more about him to reckon whether he actually improved the lives of the poor via legislation. It's comparable to spinning straw into gold.

    Burke was a big believer in governance not based on utilitarian computations, but transcendent principle. This transcendent principle would be informed through the Bible and reinforced via custom and long-standing local institutions.

    Unlike many political people who started with principle and ended with people, Burke understood one could not have principle without a real care for what happens to people who comprise communities. Individuals including the least among us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    I don't know, I'm not really familiar with politics. It seems like Dickens was always against legislation that would oppress the poor further. Was it Burke that said the only way evil can triumph is for good men to do nothing? I DO know about Lord Ashley, and his crusades to improve the lives of the poor through legislation. A really good Christian role model.
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Nihil novi sub sole.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Desdichado's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 9th, 2014
    Age
    26
    Posts
    5,497
    Rep Power
    51

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Burke would then not be in favor of a law which hurt the poor for the sake of looking pious.
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Nihil novi sub sole.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Desdichado View Post
    I know little of Lord Ashley. I'll need to read more about him to reckon whether he actually improved the lives of the poor via legislation. It's comparable to spinning straw into gold.

    Burke was a big believer in governance not based on utilitarian computations, but transcendent principle. This transcendent principle would be informed through the Bible and reinforced via custom and long-standing local institutions.

    Unlike many political people who started with principle and ended with people, Burke understood one could not have principle without a real care for what happens to people who comprise communities. Individuals including the least among us.
    Thanks, Dickens would definitely be Burkeian, then. He was no utilitarian. Ashley was responsible for championing the ragged schools- so even poor children could get a rudimentary education, his legislation ir support, ended young children working un mines, and helped to shorten hours for child labor. There are other things, too. I think he was probably more effective than a politician could be in today's world.
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

  7. #27
    Senior Member Magenta's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 3rd, 2015
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,092
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    212

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    I like the Alastair Sim one, too. It's the grittiest in a way. It really looks like what I imagine Victorian London would like like, and the Ghost of Christmas Future scene is well done. I haven't seen the Jim Carey version. I know what you mean about being irritated when the versions leave out key speeches- especially his reclamation speeches.

    Pride and Prejudice is special, but I love Persuasion more. The Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice is one of my most favorite things to watch. It's perfection. The actors are all well cast. Colin Firth is a beautiful Darcy, just like I imagined. There is no telling how many women fell in love with him after that version came out.

    I'm impressed that you can read books on pdf! I'd probably end up printing it out. Lol, if you don't know about Project Gutenberg already, it's a database of free books. Most of them are classics or books in the public domain.
    Heh, I tried reading Atlas Shrugged in PDF form; it contributed to me buying a Kindle a few years ago... So I finished reading Atlas as the first book on my new Kindle, but the spelling mistakes were atrocious, and once, a string of words was so completely incomprehensible I had to go back to the PDF and search out that exact spot to see what was actually written. I did love the features on the Kindle though, like the built-in dictionary and being able to wiki anything in the book... I spent a lot of time researching while I was reading and that was fun too! Being able to look up words right on the spot was priceless.

    I go through phases with my reading. My daughter did download and put a lot of books on my Kindle for me, and for over a year after that I was reading about four books a week, but that kind of pace burned me out and brought me to a halt eventually. That must have been right after I got rid of my television about four years ago. I did get some really good reads in though, and from what I remember I would highly recommend Cutting For Stone, The Poisonwood Bible, The Weight of Water, State of Wonder, The Light Between Oceans... a couple of books I recommend from further years gone by would be Robin Maxwell's The Secret Diary of Anne Boleyn followed by The Queen's Bastard (about Anne's child who grew into Queen Elizabeth I).

    Many years ago I read The Vampire Lestat series over and over. I though Anne Rice's writing amazing until she got so famous it seemed her editors gave her carte blanche. But that series was incredible, perhaps especially Memnoch The Devil. She claims to be a Christian but she seems very disenfranchised and it could be her Catholicism...

    I also loved The Earth Children Series by Jean Auel, a six part series that started with Clan of the Cave Bear.

    Persuasion, hmmm, I actually do not really know that one offhand though of course I recognize the name Wentworth; I will have to read it again! I love Sense and Sensibility, and the movie with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet with awkward Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman... Ang Lee did such a wonderful job there. The best dad in P&P was Donald Sutherland. So many wonderful characters, and her writing makes me fall in love with her sensibilities and how people communicated.

    My daughter just finished putting more books on her dad's and her aunt's e-devices. I should fire my Kindle up and see what might catch my eye. I have not read much since then... except for a book called Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese. I really enjoyed that

    ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤
    Galatea likes this.
    Embrace the Grace and Rejoice in His Everlasting Mercy and Love.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
    Heh, I tried reading Atlas Shrugged in PDF form; it contributed to me buying a Kindle a few years ago... So I finished reading Atlas as the first book on my new Kindle, but the spelling mistakes were atrocious, and once, a string of words was so completely incomprehensible I had to go back to the PDF and search out that exact spot to see what was actually written. I did love the features on the Kindle though, like the built-in dictionary and being able to wiki anything in the book... I spent a lot of time researching while I was reading and that was fun too! Being able to look up words right on the spot was priceless.

    I go through phases with my reading. My daughter did download and put a lot of books on my Kindle for me, and for over a year after that I was reading about four books a week, but that kind of pace burned me out and brought me to a halt eventually. That must have been right after I got rid of my television about four years ago. I did get some really good reads in though, and from what I remember I would highly recommend Cutting For Stone, The Poisonwood Bible, The Weight of Water, State of Wonder, The Light Between Oceans... a couple of books I recommend from further years gone by would be Robin Maxwell's The Secret Diary of Anne Boleyn followed by The Queen's Bastard (about Anne's child who grew into Queen Elizabeth I).

    Many years ago I read The Vampire Lestat series over and over. I though Anne Rice's writing amazing until she got so famous it seemed her editors gave her carte blanche. But that series was incredible, perhaps especially Memnoch The Devil. She claims to be a Christian but she seems very disenfranchised and it could be her Catholicism...

    I also loved The Earth Children Series by Jean Auel, a six part series that started with Clan of the Cave Bear.

    Persuasion, hmmm, I actually do not really know that one offhand though of course I recognize the name Wentworth; I will have to read it again! I love Sense and Sensibility, and the movie with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet with awkward Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman... Ang Lee did such a wonderful job there. The best dad in P&P was Donald Sutherland. So many wonderful characters, and her writing makes me fall in love with her sensibilities and how people communicated.

    My daughter just finished putting more books on her dad's and her aunt's e-devices. I should fire my Kindle up and see what might catch my eye. I have not read much since then... except for a book called Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese. I really enjoyed that

    ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤
    I haven't read Atlas Shrugged, yet. Or the other books you recommended! I'll have to put them on my list. I'm so old fashioned, I like physical books best. The sensory experience of reading is important to me. I like the feel of pages, the smell of the book, the weight of it. I love the smell of old books. It's weird, but a "thing". I read an article that explained why people like the aroma of old books. Apparently, the decaying pages have a vanilla like smell. I like reading an old book and wondering how many people read the same words, and held the same book.

    I'm not dissing the e-readers, I know a lot of people have them and have access to thousands of books on it.

    Was it hard getting rid of your television? I think I would miss the background noise more than the programs, truth be told.

    Persuasion is beautiful, love lost and love restored. Yes, Captain Wentworth is the hero of the piece. I love all Austen's books, but Mansfield Park may be my least favorite because Fanny is TOO good.
    Sense and Sensibility is beautiful. I say it is REALLY a love story between sisters. The Emma Thimpson version is my favorite, Hugh Grant WAS an awkward Edward. Alan Rickman was divine. He's one of my favorites.

    I agree, it was well done. You have a good daughter to download books for you. We are going to try to start a book club if you are interested.
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

  9. #29
    Senior Member Magenta's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 3rd, 2015
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,092
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    212

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    I haven't read Atlas Shrugged, yet. Or the other books you recommended! I'll have to put them on my list. I'm so old fashioned, I like physical books best. The sensory experience of reading is important to me. I like the feel of pages, the smell of the book, the weight of it. I love the smell of old books. It's weird, but a "thing". I read an article that explained why people like the aroma of old books. Apparently, the decaying pages have a vanilla like smell. I like reading an old book and wondering how many people read the same words, and held the same book.

    I'm not dissing the e-readers, I know a lot of people have them and have access to thousands of books on it.

    Was it hard getting rid of your television? I think I would miss the background noise more than the programs, truth be told.

    Persuasion is beautiful, love lost and love restored. Yes, Captain Wentworth is the hero of the piece. I love all Austen's books, but Mansfield Park may be my least favorite because Fanny is TOO good.

    Sense and Sensibility is beautiful. I say it is REALLY a love story between sisters. The Emma Thimpson version is my favorite, Hugh Grant WAS an awkward Edward. Alan Rickman was divine. He's one of my favorites.

    I agree, it was well done. You have a good daughter to download books for you. We are going to try to start a book club if you are interested.
    If you are going to read Ayn Rand I would suggest starting with We The Living. It is semi autobiographical and such an indictment against Russian communism, it should be read by every student Then I would suggest reading The Fountainhead second. I have read both those books about four and five times each respectively haha. Her romantic love story aspect is not normal but everything else is superlative. Atlas Shrugged I have read six times. I was happy to have it the first book read on my Kindle, but I agree with you: there is nothing like holding a book in your hands. I can remember where abouts in a book I read something (how far in), what side it was on and where approximately on the page (how close to the top or bottom) and none of those cues are available in e format because you are always on the same page LOL. You can even change the size of your font, which of course rearranges everything else. There are definite drawbacks, and yet as with many digital devices, they are just so handy.

    I first got rid of my TV when I was 33 and lived without until I was fifty. It was at that time I thought maybe a nice little television would be okay and I came home with a 42 inch flat screen Sony Wega high definition digital set that was cause for me to pretty much rearrange my whole living room. For the first about three years I only watched DVDs on it, mostly with my daughter. We would rent both movies and series, since she is not a TV fan and I had not had one for so long, there were many things neither of us had seen. We both really enjoyed Six Feet Under and got lost in Lost haha. I was off sick one week and watched all five seasons of Boston Legal.

    Then I got cable and started watching so much TV and getting more and more packages. Ugh. It was fun while it lasted, but a few years ago when I decluttered my apartment, after impulsively buying new furniture... after the TV had been off for two weeks, shoved into the kitchen while the living room was being painted and the carpet was being ripped up to restore the hardwood floor underneath... well, it seemed a good time to say goodbye again. I don't really miss it, and to be honest, there is so much on youtube transferred over from the telly. Even full movies, and documentaries, and of course it used to be fairly ad free but not so much now...

    Good night Galatea It has been lovely chatting with you!

    Galatea likes this.
    Embrace the Grace and Rejoice in His Everlasting Mercy and Love.

  10. #30
    GODisLOVE7
    Guest

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    I haven't read Atlas Shrugged, yet. Or the other books you recommended! I'll have to put them on my list. I'm so old fashioned, I like physical books best. The sensory experience of reading is important to me. I like the feel of pages, the smell of the book, the weight of it. I love the smell of old books. It's weird, but a "thing". I read an article that explained why people like the aroma of old books. Apparently, the decaying pages have a vanilla like smell. I like reading an old book and wondering how many people read the same words, and held the same book.

    I'm not dissing the e-readers, I know a lot of people have them and have access to thousands of books on it.

    Was it hard getting rid of your television? I think I would miss the background noise more than the programs, truth be told.

    Persuasion is beautiful, love lost and love restored. Yes, Captain Wentworth is the hero of the piece. I love all Austen's books, but Mansfield Park may be my least favorite because Fanny is TOO good.
    Sense and Sensibility is beautiful. I say it is REALLY a love story between sisters. The Emma Thimpson version is my favorite, Hugh Grant WAS an awkward Edward. Alan Rickman was divine. He's one of my favorites.

    I agree, it was well done. You have a good daughter to download books for you. We are going to try to start a book club if you are interested.
    Ooh! Galatea! I just saw you mentioning Atlas Shrugged on the side feed thingy.

    Personally, I enjoyed The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand wayyyy more than Atlas Shrugged. Not sure if that was mentioned or if you have read it. I havent been in this thread. Just popping in and popping out!

    Sorry! Dont mind me! Lol!
    Desdichado, Magenta and Galatea like this.

  11. #31
    Senior Member Desdichado's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 9th, 2014
    Age
    26
    Posts
    5,497
    Rep Power
    51

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    It WAS way better than Atlas Shrugged.

    Quote Originally Posted by GODisLOVE7 View Post
    Ooh! Galatea! I just saw you mentioning Atlas Shrugged on the side feed thingy.

    Personally, I enjoyed The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand wayyyy more than Atlas Shrugged. Not sure if that was mentioned or if you have read it. I havent been in this thread. Just popping in and popping out!

    Sorry! Dont mind me! Lol!
    Galatea and GODisLOVE7 like this.
    Nihil novi sub sole.

  12. #32


    88
    88 is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    November 14th, 2016
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,709
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    21

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Having a girl play that part may be to appeal to Scrooge's tender nature----from his past----to soften his heart...
    Magenta and Galatea like this.

  13. #33
    Senior Member Tinuviel's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 6th, 2015
    Age
    17
    Posts
    2,164
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    29

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
    In many versions, the Ghost of Christmas Past is played by a girl. I wonder why they didn't just hire an old man. One version DOES have Christmas Past as a short, old man. I can't remember if it is the Alastair Sim or Reginald Owen version. Those two are pretty old. I don't know if you've seen them.

    Which is your favorite Austen book? I read you are a fan in the introvert thread. I love her, too.
    Oh boy...long or short version? The short version answer to that question is Mansfield Park. If you're interested in a longer version, see below

    I found Mansfield Park very, very satisfying both emotionally and intellectually. Emotionally, Fanny and Edmund are perfect for each other, and Fanny deserved him after all she'd gone through when he was courting Mary. Intellectually, I find it satisfying because it is so complex. Mary says something that is repeated to Fanny by Edmund through Edmund's rose-colored glasses and you as the reader finally get to hear it from Fanny's perspective or with her commentary. Lots to sift through to find the real characters.

    This second slot should really be the Emma/Persuasion/Pride and Prejudice slot, and I will occasionally find myself calling one of these my favorites, as well. Emma was amazing. I see this as one of Austen's most masterfully written books. There are things that you as the reader know, even when Emma as the narrator (for lack of a better word) does not. I love the light and witty style of the entire book, and of course...Mr. Knightly plays heavily into my love of this book

    Persuasion was a book that I feel I could read five times in a month and still there would be concepts in it that I didn't quite grasp. Austen's grip on human characters and her writing style get better with age. This was one of my favorite story lines, and I only wish Austen had lived to completely finish it. As it is, it lacks her usual polish.

    Pride and Prejudice Most people tend to recommend this book as a first to Austen readers, and I can see why. It showcases her great style, and is her most driving plot line. However, I prefer the "quieter" Austen couples (e.g. Fanny and Edmund, Anne and Fredrick), and the witty, strong spirited Elizabeth and the bold, somewhat arrogant, rich Mr. Darcy are far from the quiet Fanny/Edmund type! However, it was a great book, and it has been my favorite before.

    Sense and Sensibility The reason this one comes so far down the list is actually quite simple. I read it when I was 13 or so and I was like "Good night! I AM MARIANNE!" I disliked that thought so much, and I was so freaked out that Austen had captured my heart and the most unsavory of my emotions on paper for everyone to read that I put the book down on the spot. Several years later, I re-read it, and discovered (much like Marianne at the end of the book) I had grown up a lot and learned some lessons; Marianne and I had grown apart, and it was no longer painful to read about her. I enjoyed the book, but for the purely personal reason I mentioned, I've always had a bad taste in my mouth when I read it. (give me another 5 years ). I love the scene where Edward comes to visit the Dashwoods, and they mistakenly think that he is now married! Epic!

    Northanger Abbey I know and love people who put this book very high up on their list, but this is the one Austen that I am even remotely close to disliking. Austen has not had time to develop her own writing style or her spot-on character sketches, and I feel the storyline is a bit of a drag. Henry Tilney was a great guy and a bright spot in the book, but he didn't make up for John and Isabella Thorpe!
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.
    ~James 1:17

  14. #34
    Senior Member Magenta's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 3rd, 2015
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,092
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    212

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Good morning all

    I have remembered a couple of other books from my
    e-reading days that I would highly recommend to anyone

    The first one is The Art Of Racing In The Rain. Oh, such a charming and heartwarming book, totally surprising in that it is written from the perspective of the main character's pet dog.

    The second is The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared. The sweep of history in this book presented through the life memories of the main character is very entertaining.

    Tinuviel, you and Galatea could make a living reviewing books and movies too, no doubt. Such rich and complex insights, caught in the as yet untarnished hope and idealism of youth, are quite refreshing I find Des' perspective enlightening also!
    Galatea likes this.
    Embrace the Grace and Rejoice in His Everlasting Mercy and Love.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Tinuviel's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 6th, 2015
    Age
    17
    Posts
    2,164
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    29

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
    Good morning all

    I have remembered a couple of other books from my
    e-reading days that I would highly recommend to anyone

    The first one is The Art Of Racing In The Rain. Oh, such a charming and heartwarming book, totally surprising in that it is written from the perspective of the main character's pet dog.

    The second is The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared. The sweep of history in this book presented through the life memories of the main character is very entertaining.

    Tinuviel, you and Galatea could make a living reviewing books and movies too, no doubt. Such rich and complex insights, caught in the as yet untarnished hope and idealism of youth, are quite refreshing I find Des' perspective enlightening also!
    Thank you! I've actually tried a few rewrites for practice and enjoyment (not for anything published) and my most recent project is putting Mansfield Park into a screenplay form! Lots of cool stuff trying to portray a book on the screen. My siblings and I put together one scene and filmed it and it was so fun! Even if I get the screenplay done, I doubt it will sell, but it is being a blast to write and it is a good time to have some in depth study of Austen
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.
    ~James 1:17

  16. #36
    Senior Member Magenta's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 3rd, 2015
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,092
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    212

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinuviel View Post
    Thank you! I've actually tried a few rewrites for practice and enjoyment (not for anything published) and my most recent project is putting Mansfield Park into a screenplay form! Lots of cool stuff trying to portray a book on the screen. My siblings and I put together one scene and filmed it and it was so fun! Even if I get the screenplay done, I doubt it will sell, but it is being a blast to write and it is a good time to have some in depth study of Austen
    Have you posted it on youtube? I would love to see it!
    Galatea likes this.
    Embrace the Grace and Rejoice in His Everlasting Mercy and Love.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Tinuviel's Avatar
    Join Date
    June 6th, 2015
    Age
    17
    Posts
    2,164
    Blog Entries
    3
    Rep Power
    29

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
    Have you posted it on youtube? I would love to see it!
    No, I'm more of a enjoy-it-with-the-family kind of person, not so much a YouTube person
    Magenta and Galatea like this.
    Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.
    ~James 1:17

  18. #38
    Senior Member Magenta's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 3rd, 2015
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,092
    Blog Entries
    2
    Rep Power
    212

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinuviel View Post
    No, I'm more of a enjoy-it-with-the-family kind of person, not so much a YouTube person
    You could start a for-fun family business and become another rags to riches overnight success story Not that I know the state of your wardrobe... although when I was a teen, the raggier my blue jeans were around the bottom hem, the better. The last thing we wanted in those days was to have blue jeans that were too short and did not drag themselves to tatters on the ground.
    Tinuviel and Galatea like this.
    Embrace the Grace and Rejoice in His Everlasting Mercy and Love.

  19. #39
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by Magenta View Post
    If you are going to read Ayn Rand I would suggest starting with We The Living. It is semi autobiographical and such an indictment against Russian communism, it should be read by every student Then I would suggest reading The Fountainhead second. I have read both those books about four and five times each respectively haha. Her romantic love story aspect is not normal but everything else is superlative. Atlas Shrugged I have read six times. I was happy to have it the first book read on my Kindle, but I agree with you: there is nothing like holding a book in your hands. I can remember where abouts in a book I read something (how far in), what side it was on and where approximately on the page (how close to the top or bottom) and none of those cues are available in e format because you are always on the same page LOL. You can even change the size of your font, which of course rearranges everything else. There are definite drawbacks, and yet as with many digital devices, they are just so handy.

    I first got rid of my TV when I was 33 and lived without until I was fifty. It was at that time I thought maybe a nice little television would be okay and I came home with a 42 inch flat screen Sony Wega high definition digital set that was cause for me to pretty much rearrange my whole living room. For the first about three years I only watched DVDs on it, mostly with my daughter. We would rent both movies and series, since she is not a TV fan and I had not had one for so long, there were many things neither of us had seen. We both really enjoyed Six Feet Under and got lost in Lost haha. I was off sick one week and watched all five seasons of Boston Legal.

    Then I got cable and started watching so much TV and getting more and more packages. Ugh. It was fun while it lasted, but a few years ago when I decluttered my apartment, after impulsively buying new furniture... after the TV had been off for two weeks, shoved into the kitchen while the living room was being painted and the carpet was being ripped up to restore the hardwood floor underneath... well, it seemed a good time to say goodbye again. I don't really miss it, and to be honest, there is so much on youtube transferred over from the telly. Even full movies, and documentaries, and of course it used to be fairly ad free but not so much now...

    Good night Galatea It has been lovely chatting with you!

    I will take your advice about the order in which I should read Ayn Rand. I haven't read any of her works yet, but I saw The Fountainhead with Gary Cooper- but I am sure it is most definitely not the same as reading the book. I am a Cooper fan, and was more focused on the love story aspect than the social commentary. I read that people think her ethics are kind of cold, that she goes way to the other extreme by repudiating communism. Like, the highest good is doing whatever best benefits yourself, the individual, and don't bother about the group at all- no altruism. I don't know if this is true, as I never read her and can not form my own opinion. I have gaps in my education, some are chasms. Like I have read no philosophy or theology. It is a shame.

    I liked buying used college textbooks to read the comments from other students. I also get a thrill when I buy an old book and a bonus is found- a receipt, a note, a bookmark, a newspaper clipping. I like to read what other people underlined and wonder at the significance if it is not immediately apparent. I am a vicarious reader in some ways. I like looking at the library dates on the slip and wonder about the people who checked out the book. One time, I found a construction paper card from the 1950s a child had made inviting her mother to a Mother's Day program at school. The poor lady probably wondered where she misplaced her child's card. And all this for a $1.00 most of the time.

    I know gadgets are handy, and the way of the world, but impersonal. I think you know what I mean. I think two good things about e-readers are people who have limited space can still have a gigantic library. That's a VERY good thing, and they are very portable. I bought my sister a kindle for Christmas one year. She brought it with her when she had jury duty and told me she was very glad to have it.

    Sometimes, I feel very guilty about watching junky television, but I do a lot of other time wasting things, so it is no different. Years ago, my sister and I talked about seeing things on television that we ought not to watch, so I typed up the verse out of Psalm 101:3 " I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside; it shall not cleave to me.", framed it and put it on top of our television cabinet. For a long time, we went by the verse and didn't watch anything salacious or violent. I don't know why we stopped. I guess it is one of those things you slip into doing, and I remember the first crime show we watched and I was physically ill because I was not used to watching that kind of stuff anymore. I took down the verse, because we were back to watching stuff that is not that great. I probably need to find it and put it back up, not a legalistic thing, but a personal conviction kind of thing, if that makes sense.

    We were crazy about Lost, the first two seasons were fantastic, but then they changed writers and the flavor was not the same. We still watched it though, I almost stopped when Charlie died. I loved his character. I think I liked Dominc Monaghan ever since he was in Lord of the Rings, anyway.


    I hear many people are going to only Netflix and do not have cable or satellite. I guess it makes sense. I'm such a nerd, I watch a lot of public television, but I know you can watch it online.

    I am sorry I did not see your post before I went to sleep and see the lovely picture. I have a white rabbit, and he is an angel. Thank you, very much. Thanks for the nice chat.
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

  20. #40
    Senior Member Galatea's Avatar
    Join Date
    November 25th, 2016
    Age
    37
    Posts
    984
    Rep Power
    24

    Default Re: Stave Three of A Christmas Carol

    Quote Originally Posted by GODisLOVE7 View Post
    Ooh! Galatea! I just saw you mentioning Atlas Shrugged on the side feed thingy.

    Personally, I enjoyed The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand wayyyy more than Atlas Shrugged. Not sure if that was mentioned or if you have read it. I havent been in this thread. Just popping in and popping out!

    Sorry! Dont mind me! Lol!
    You are always welcome. I love talking about books, even ones I haven't read yet. I have not read either, but did see The Fountainhead with Gary Cooper. You should see it if you have not. He was a fine looking man, the strong, silent type. I tried to think of which movie it was that caused me to fall in love with him, I think it was ​Mr. Deeds Goes to Town
    Magenta likes this.
    Philippians 1:6 "Being confident of this very thing, that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ"

Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Stave Two of "A Christmas Carol"
    By Galatea in forum Miscellaneous
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: December 29th, 2016, 11:55 PM
  2. Stave One of "A Christmas Carol"
    By Galatea in forum Miscellaneous
    Replies: 113
    Last Post: December 25th, 2016, 11:58 PM
  3. cHRISTMAS cAROL IN uKRAINIAN
    By jkalyna in forum Christian Music Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 24th, 2015, 07:53 PM
  4. what version of Christmas Carol is best??!?!?
    By jb800m in forum Miscellaneous
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: November 5th, 2013, 02:52 PM
  5. Favourite Christmas Carol
    By Miri in forum Miscellaneous
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 6th, 2012, 05:34 PM