Do you know: what is the significance of Mark 14:51-52?

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May 17, 2019
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#1
Sometimes there are very short passages in the Bible, that make me wonder why they are there, and this is one of them. Mark 14:51-52 A young man, wearing nothing but a linen garment, was following Jesus. When they seized him, he fled naked, leaving his garment behind.

I cannot figure this out. Is it an allegory about if we run away from Jesus we are naked? Or is the linen garment a symbol of the shoud of Jesus?

Thanks.
 
Jun 10, 2019
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#2
Ahh the widows son who followed Jesus.
 
Jun 10, 2019
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#3
In many ways he showed them about the resurrection, did they understand, it took awhile.

John 20
3Then Peter and the other disciple set out for the tomb. 4The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. 5He bent down and looked in at the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in.

6Simon Peter arrived just after him. He entered the tomb and saw the linen cloths lying there.
 

PS

Senior Member
Jan 11, 2013
5,399
693
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#4
Sometimes there are very short passages in the Bible, that make me wonder why they are there, and this is one of them. Mark 14:51-52 A young man, wearing nothing but a linen garment, was following Jesus. When they seized him, he fled naked, leaving his garment behind.

I cannot figure this out. Is it an allegory about if we run away from Jesus we are naked? Or is the linen garment a symbol of the shoud of Jesus?

Thanks.
The linen cloth was probably a bed sheet. This is what David Guzik, a commentator I really like says:

Since the earliest days of the church, commentators have supposed this young man to be Mark himself. It was his humble way of saying, “I was there.”

i. Many people suppose that the upper room where Jesus held the last supper just a few hours earlier was at a home owned by Mark’s family. Act_12:12 says that the disciples used to meet at the home of Mark’s mother. It may be that the arresting army led by Judas first came to Mark’s home, because that is where Judas last left Jesus. When Judas and the group came and found them gone, it would have been easy for Judas to suppose that they went to Gethsemane, because Jesus was accustomed to going there (Luk_22:39). When the Judas and the group started out for Gethsemane, we can imagine that young Mark hurriedly dressed in a simple linen cloth and set out to beat Judas and his gang to Gethsemane so he could warn Jesus.

ii. “It is usually supposed that Mark himself, son of Mary (Act_12:12) in whose house they probably had observed the Passover meal, had followed Jesus and the apostles to the Garden.” (Robertson)

iii. Lane writes that Mark recorded this “To emphasize the fact that all fled, leaving Jesus alone in the custody of the police. No one remained with Jesus, not even a valiant young man who intended to follow him.”

iv. “The modest spirit of Mark seemed to say, ‘Friend Peter, while the Holy Ghost moves me to, tell thy fault, and let it stand on record, he also constrains me to write my own as a sort of preface to it, for I, too, in my mad, hare-brained folly, would have run, unclothed as I was, upon the guard to rescue my Lord and Master; yet, at the first sight, of the rough legionaries, at the first gleam of their swords, away I fled, timid, faint-hearted, and afraid that I should be too roughly handled.’“ (Spurgeon)
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
35,008
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#5
Many believe it was Mark himself, as no other gospel records this incident :)
 
May 17, 2019
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#6
The linen cloth was probably a bed sheet. This is what David Guzik, a commentator I really like says:

Since the earliest days of the church, commentators have supposed this young man to be Mark himself. It was his humble way of saying, “I was there.”

i. Many people suppose that the upper room where Jesus held the last supper just a few hours earlier was at a home owned by Mark’s family. Act_12:12 says that the disciples used to meet at the home of Mark’s mother. It may be that the arresting army led by Judas first came to Mark’s home, because that is where Judas last left Jesus. When Judas and the group came and found them gone, it would have been easy for Judas to suppose that they went to Gethsemane, because Jesus was accustomed to going there (Luk_22:39). When the Judas and the group started out for Gethsemane, we can imagine that young Mark hurriedly dressed in a simple linen cloth and set out to beat Judas and his gang to Gethsemane so he could warn Jesus.

ii. “It is usually supposed that Mark himself, son of Mary (Act_12:12) in whose house they probably had observed the Passover meal, had followed Jesus and the apostles to the Garden.” (Robertson)

iii. Lane writes that Mark recorded this “To emphasize the fact that all fled, leaving Jesus alone in the custody of the police. No one remained with Jesus, not even a valiant young man who intended to follow him.”

iv. “The modest spirit of Mark seemed to say, ‘Friend Peter, while the Holy Ghost moves me to, tell thy fault, and let it stand on record, he also constrains me to write my own as a sort of preface to it, for I, too, in my mad, hare-brained folly, would have run, unclothed as I was, upon the guard to rescue my Lord and Master; yet, at the first sight, of the rough legionaries, at the first gleam of their swords, away I fled, timid, faint-hearted, and afraid that I should be too roughly handled.’“ (Spurgeon)
Thank you PS, for taking the time to carefully reply. I didn't know any of the things you wrote.
 
May 17, 2019
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#7
Many believe it was Mark himself, as no other gospel records this incident :)
Thanks Magenta, I didn't know this, although I did notice that this incident is only in the gospel of Mark, and I wondered why
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
35,008
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#8
Thanks Magenta, I didn't know this, although I did notice that this incident is only in the gospel of Mark, and I wondered why
You are welcome, lolo4 :) Mark was probably quite young at that time...
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
13,545
6,198
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#9
I cannot figure this out. Is it an allegory about if we run away from Jesus we are naked? Or is the linen garment a symbol of the shroud of Jesus?
We do not need to read into this incident anything more than what is presented. The fact of the matter is that all the disciples of Jesus forsook Him and fled from the time of His betrayal. Then Peter denied Him thrice. This incident was another confirmation that the fear of man overcame the disciples at that time.

But Jesus did not hold this against them, and also restored Peter after His resurrection. However, after Pentecost, when the disciples were empowered by the Holy Spirit, the apostles and disciples lost all their fear of men, and were willingly martyred for the sake of Christ.
 
U

UnderGrace

Guest
#10
Sometimes there are very short passages in the Bible, that make me wonder why they are there, and this is one of them. Mark 14:51-52 A young man, wearing nothing but a linen garment, was following Jesus. When they seized him, he fled naked, leaving his garment behind.

I cannot figure this out. Is it an allegory about if we run away from Jesus we are naked? Or is the linen garment a symbol of the shoud of Jesus?

Thanks.
It gives the narrative realism, this is important.
 

TheDivineWatermark

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2018
5,634
1,130
113
#11
In many ways he showed them about the resurrection, did they understand, it took awhile.

John 20
3Then Peter and the other disciple set out for the tomb. 4The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. 5He bent down and looked in at the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in.

6Simon Peter arrived just after him. He entered the tomb and saw the linen cloths lying there.
I agree with the bold, somewhat, (I disagree that it was "the widow's son who followed Jesus," per your previous post :) )... I actually believe it was the one who ran with Peter to the [Jesus' empty] sepulchre (I realize the common belief is that that was John, the unnamed disciple and supposed writer of the book of John etc [yes, I'm aware of all the arguments regarding this :D ]), so where it says (in bold, below):


6 Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

7 And the napkin, that was about his head, not lying with the linen clothes, but wrapped together in a place by itself.

8 Then went in also that other disciple, which came first to the sepulchre, and he saw, and believed.

9 For as yet they knew not the scripture, that he must rise again from the dead.

... the "and HE SAW, AND BELIEVED" refers only to "that other disciple," and is not said of "Peter"... so in this way, I believe [being the same one with the "linen [grave] cloths" around himself in the earlier Mark 14:51-52 scene] he understood death in an experiential way... and when you trace back through all the places regarding this person [the one who "that other disciple" correlates with], he'd be the same person to whom Jesus had answered Peter's Q of "what about him??" (in the John 21:21 scene, "Peter, seeing him [that same guy] saith to Jesus, Lord, and what [shall] this man [do]?" Recall, the subject being discussed was Peter's own "death," and "by what" death he should glorify God--so Peter is asking about the one who'd already had "linen [grave] cloths" about him...).

Here is where Jesus responds with, "IF I WILL THAT he should tarry till I come, what is that to thee? Follow thou me." (Said to Peter alone, as I see it.) Then as a result of this convo, "went this [incorrect] saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die: yet JESUS SAID NOT unto him [unto Peter], He [that other disciple] shall not die; but, IF I WILL THAT he should tarry till I come, what is that to thee?" This, showing that it didn't concern Peter (he was to "follow thou me" regardless of the other guy's fate)... but understanding "why" Peter would have even asked such a question, helps (IMO), as they were talking about "death" (by means of "persecution, on account of Him/Jesus") and he grasped that this one had already [experientially] died (the "linen cloths" about him, in the Mk14 scene) so wondered if he would also be put to death (again), this time by means of this "persecution, on account of Jesus").

I believe he only "fled" because he was "naked" (when "the young men laid hold on him"), meaning, he was more bold than the others who'd fled (and THEY fled not on account of being "naked" or even "laid hold on"), and all this led to his "saw the linen cloths [of Jesus' sepulchre], AND BELIEVED"... [again, not said of Peter] (and that he likely represents those of Israel [like in Dan12:1-4, regarding "still-living persons"/i.e. Israel coming up out of the graveyard of nations, where scattered] in the future trib period, who will do the same [per Olivet Discourse], and also who will "endure to the end" of the trib [having heeded the Lk21:36 instruction], so to enter the MK-age in mortal bodies [capable of reproducing/bearing children], like that to which Dan12:12 refers ["BLESSED"... correlating with the "BLESSED" of Rev16:15-16 [speaks of "thy nakedness"]/ Rev19:9 (re: the wedding FEAST/SUPPER/MK-age, commencing upon His "RETURN" to the earth)]).

I wrote all that too quickly (so excuse the flaws), I'm on a deadline I need to get back to... :)
 

TheDivineWatermark

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2018
5,634
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#12
EDIT (to add): where I'd put, "[like in Dan12:1-4, regarding "still-living persons"/i.e. Israel coming up out of the graveyard of nations, where scattered (which is LIKENED TO "a resurrection"--Rom11:15(25); Ezek37:12-14,20-23; Hos5:15-6:3; Isa26:16-21; etc...)]
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
33,802
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#13
We do not need to read into this incident anything more than what is presented. .
The thing is, what was presented, in and of itself, has no spiritual value. That obscure verse is there for a reason, however, without supporting verses, this verse holds no meaning.
 
May 17, 2019
86
103
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#14
We do not need to read into this incident anything more than what is presented. The fact of the matter is that all the disciples of Jesus forsook Him and fled from the time of His betrayal. Then Peter denied Him thrice. This incident was another confirmation that the fear of man overcame the disciples at that time.

But Jesus did not hold this against them, and also restored Peter after His resurrection. However, after Pentecost, when the disciples were empowered by the Holy Spirit, the apostles and disciples lost all their fear of men, and were willingly martyred for the sake of Christ.
Yes, I suppose we don't need to read into the incident more than what is presented, however, sometimes details in a verse or chapter jump out at me, and I wonder why these 2 short verses were only included in Mark.

"All scripture is inspired by God and is profitable for teaching, for rebuking, for correcting and for training in righteousness." 2 Timothy 3:16

I guess this is why I wondered what God wanted us to see when he inspired Mark to write this.
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
11,245
2,913
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#15
it's man's basic 'human-nature', it goes back to Adam -
GEN. 3:10.
And he said, I heard Your Voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.'

that's exactly what is happening in the MARK Scripture, like Adam, he was clothed in linen=clothed in Righteousness,
but, then he was 'afraid - and then he became 'naked', because he 'hid/fled himself' from God...

there is nothing new under the sun'.
 
Jun 10, 2019
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#16
I agree with the bold, somewhat, (I disagree that it was "the widow's son who followed Jesus," per your previous post :) )... I actually believe it was the one who ran with Peter to the [Jesus' empty] sepulchre (I realize the common belief is that that was John, the unnamed disciple and supposed writer of the book of John etc [yes, I'm aware of all the arguments regarding this :D ]), so where it says (in bold, below):


6 Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

7 And the napkin, that was about his head, not lying with the linen clothes, but wrapped together in a place by itself.

8 Then went in also that other disciple, which came first to the sepulchre, and he saw, and believed.

9 For as yet they knew not the scripture, that he must rise again from the dead.

... the "and HE SAW, AND BELIEVED" refers only to "that other disciple," and is not said of "Peter"... so in this way, I believe [being the same one with the "linen [grave] cloths" around himself in the earlier Mark 14:51-52 scene] he understood death in an experiential way... and when you trace back through all the places regarding this person [the one who "that other disciple" correlates with], he'd be the same person to whom Jesus had answered Peter's Q of "what about him??" (in the John 21:21 scene, "Peter, seeing him [that same guy] saith to Jesus, Lord, and what [shall] this man [do]?" Recall, the subject being discussed was Peter's own "death," and "by what" death he should glorify God--so Peter is asking about the one who'd already had "linen [grave] cloths" about him...).

Here is where Jesus responds with, "IF I WILL THAT he should tarry till I come, what is that to thee? Follow thou me." (Said to Peter alone, as I see it.) Then as a result of this convo, "went this [incorrect] saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die: yet JESUS SAID NOT unto him [unto Peter], He [that other disciple] shall not die; but, IF I WILL THAT he should tarry till I come, what is that to thee?" This, showing that it didn't concern Peter (he was to "follow thou me" regardless of the other guy's fate)... but understanding "why" Peter would have even asked such a question, helps (IMO), as they were talking about "death" (by means of "persecution, on account of Him/Jesus") and he grasped that this one had already [experientially] died (the "linen cloths" about him, in the Mk14 scene) so wondered if he would also be put to death (again), this time by means of this "persecution, on account of Jesus").

I believe he only "fled" because he was "naked" (when "the young men laid hold on him"), meaning, he was more bold than the others who'd fled (and THEY fled not on account of being "naked" or even "laid hold on"), and all this led to his "saw the linen cloths [of Jesus' sepulchre], AND BELIEVED"... [again, not said of Peter] (and that he likely represents those of Israel [like in Dan12:1-4, regarding "still-living persons"/i.e. Israel coming up out of the graveyard of nations, where scattered] in the future trib period, who will do the same [per Olivet Discourse], and also who will "endure to the end" of the trib [having heeded the Lk21:36 instruction], so to enter the MK-age in mortal bodies [capable of reproducing/bearing children], like that to which Dan12:12 refers ["BLESSED"... correlating with the "BLESSED" of Rev16:15-16 [speaks of "thy nakedness"]/ Rev19:9 (re: the wedding FEAST/SUPPER/MK-age, commencing upon His "RETURN" to the earth)]).

I wrote all that too quickly (so excuse the flaws), I'm on a deadline I need to get back to... :)
Thks for posting, a good analogy as well, surely could have been anyone one of them, who followed.
 
Jun 10, 2019
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#17
The thing is, what was presented, in and of itself, has no spiritual value. That obscure verse is there for a reason, however, without supporting verses, this verse holds no meaning.
Could indeed, what could support such a statement and why such a statement, for what reason?

IMO., a man who says here’s your mother now for she is a widow as well, who’s son raised from the dead.
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
33,802
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Tennessee
#18
Yes, I suppose we don't need to read into the incident more than what is presented, however, sometimes details in a verse or chapter jump out at me, and I wonder why these 2 short verses were only included in Mark.

"All scripture is inspired by God and is profitable for teaching, for rebuking, for correcting and for training in righteousness." 2 Timothy 3:16

I guess this is why I wondered what God wanted us to see when he inspired Mark to write this.
The verse in 2Tmothy 3:16 is conclusive evidence that the verse in Mark is there for an express purpose, and not just an entry about some guy running away from the authorities naked. There is more to this verse than just a cursory reading will reveal.
 

ToastAndTea

Well-known member
Jul 31, 2018
289
370
63
#19
Sometimes there are very short passages in the Bible, that make me wonder why they are there, and this is one of them. Mark 14:51-52 A young man, wearing nothing but a linen garment, was following Jesus. When they seized him, he fled naked, leaving his garment behind.

I cannot figure this out. Is it an allegory about if we run away from Jesus we are naked? Or is the linen garment a symbol of the shoud of Jesus?

Thanks.
The man is thought to have been the writer of Mark, as he was the only one who could have given such an account. No other gospel gives mention of this fact. It's a curious fact but it has no other meaning than to tell what occurred at this point during the arrest of Jesus at the Garden.