Lectio divina

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Feb 3, 2010
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Lectio divina is a slow, contemplative praying of the Scriptures. Time set aside in a special way for lectio divina enables us to discover in our daily life an underlying spiritual rhythm. Within this rhythm, we discover an increasing ability to offer more of ourselves and our relationships to the Father, and to accept the embrace that God is continuously extending to us in the person of his son, Jesus Christ.

Very often our concerns, our relationships, our hopes and aspirations, naturally intertwine with our meditations on the Scriptures. We can attend "with the ear of our hearts" to our own memories, listening for God's presence in the events of our lives. We experience Christ reaching out to us through our own memories. Our own personal story becomes salvation history.

·[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Choose a text of the Scriptures that you wish to pray.  Place yourself in a comfortable position and allow yourself to become silent. Some Christians focus for a few moments on their breathing; others have a beloved "prayer word" or "prayer phrase" they gently recite.. For some, the practice known as "centering prayer" makes a good, brief introduction to lectio divina. Use whatever method is best for you and allow yourself to enjoy silence for a few moments.

·[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Turn to the text and read it slowly, gently. Savor each portion of the reading, constantly listening for the "still, small voice" God is teaching us to listen to him, to seek him in silence. He does not reach out and grab us; rather, he gently invites us ever more deeply into his presence.

·[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Take the word or phrase into yourself. Memorize it and slowly repeat it to yourself, allowing it to interact with your inner world of concerns, memories, and ideas. Allow this inner pondering, this rumination, to invite you into dialogue with God.

·[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Speak to God. Whether you use words, ideas, or images--or all three--is not important. Interact with God as you would with one who you know loves and accepts you. Give to God what you have found within your heart.

·[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Rest in God's embrace. And when he invites you to return to your contemplation of his word or to your inner dialogue with him, do so. Learn to use words when words are helpful, and to let go of words when they no longer are necessary. Rejoice in the knowledge that God is with you in both words and silence, in spiritual activity and inner receptivity.

Sometimes in lectio divina, you may return several times to the printed text, either to savor the literary context of the word or phrase that God has given or to seek a new word or phrase to ponder. At other times, only a single word or phrase will fill the whole time set aside for lectio divina. It is not necessary to assess anxiously the quality of your lectio divina, as if you were "performing" or seeking some goal. Lectio divina has no goal other than that of being in the presence of God by praying the Scriptures.
 
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glenwood74

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#2
I just learned this about two weeks ago and my study and contemplation is much more enhanced. It helps me to quiet my mind and really absorb the Word. God has really opened my thoughts and showed me the Word in a whole new perspective. It's amazing what the Spirit will show us when we invite Him to be a part of our lives. I highly recommend lectio divina.
 
Jan 8, 2009
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I have tried this, and I end up getting sleepy, lying down, and waking up with drool over my bible.