Of Ants and Men

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oyster67

Senior Member
May 24, 2014
3,052
2,643
113
#1
I had just put another log on the fire. I noticed, on the near side, two little ants running around in a circle, seemingly trying to find an way to escape the increasing heat and the fire that was beginning to engulf the far side of the log. I found a small scrap of cardboard nearby and touched it to the wood at a point near them. I did this, not because I felt that ants might be sentient, but because I felt a bit of empathy with their plight. They came up to the cardboard, touched and perhaps tasted it, but then to my disappointment turned away and went their own separate ways. At that point I began to feel my glove heating up and had to turn away.
 

shrume

Senior Member
Jun 26, 2017
2,193
461
83
#2
I had just put another log on the fire. I noticed, on the near side, two little ants running around in a circle, seemingly trying to find an way to escape the increasing heat and the fire that was beginning to engulf the far side of the log. I found a small scrap of cardboard nearby and touched it to the wood at a point near them. I did this, not because I felt that ants might be sentient, but because I felt a bit of empathy with their plight. They came up to the cardboard, touched and perhaps tasted it, but then to my disappointment turned away and went their own separate ways. At that point I began to feel my glove heating up and had to turn away.
Leaves me wanting more. :)

What is your point?
 

Hizikyah

Senior Member
Aug 25, 2013
11,634
369
0
#3
1 Peter 1:6-7, “(Salvation) in which you exult, even though for a little while, if need be, you have been grieved by manifold trials, in order that the proving of your belief – much more precious than gold that perishes, and proven by fire – might be found to result in praise and respect and esteem at the revelation of יהושע Messiah.”




1 Peter 4:12-19, “Beloved ones, do not be surprised at the fiery trial that is coming upon you, to try you, as though some unusual matter has befallen you, but as you share Messiah’s sufferings, rejoice, in order that you might rejoice exultingly at the revelation of His esteem. If you are reproached for the Name of Messiah, you are blessed, because the Spirit of esteem and of Yah rests upon you. On their part He is blasphemed, but on your part He is praised. For do not let any of you suffer as a murderer, or thief, or doer of evil, or as a meddler. But if one suffers being of Messiah, let him not be ashamed, but let him esteem Yah in this matter. Because it is time for judgment to begin from the House of Yah. And if firstly from us, what is the end of those who do not obey the Good News of Yah? And if the righteous one is scarcely saved, where shall the wicked and the sinner appear? So then, those who suffer according to the desire of Yah should commit their lives to a trustworthy Creator, in doing good."

1 Corinthians 10:11-13, “And all these came upon them as examples, and they were written as a warning to us, on whom the ends of the ages have come, so that he who thinks he stands, let him take heed lest he fall. No trial has overtaken you except such as is common to man, and Yah is trustworthy, who shall not allow you to be tried beyond what you are able, but with the trial shall also make the way of escape, enabling you to bear it.”
 

dcontroversal

Senior Member
Dec 12, 2013
45,580
19,340
113
#4
Makes me think of men and the free gift of salvation...men will not come to the light and would rather burn then escape the doomed lost state that leads to hell and eventually the lake of fire.....!
 
Feb 7, 2015
22,418
409
0
#5
First of all, I am awed by your compassion.

And, like D-con, this puts me in mind of the Parable of The Birds.

[The Parable of the Birds

Author: Louis Cassels, 1922-1974

Genre: Parable, 20th Century

Reading Time (for story text): approx. 3 minutes

Background:

Louis Cassels was born and raised in South Carolina. After graduating from Duke University in 1942, he joined the Air Force to serve during World War II. Over the course of his three years in the army, Cassels worked as a communications officer and then a first lieutenant. Soon after the war ended, he took a position as a correspondent with United Press International. He served in this capacity for twenty years before becoming senior editor in 1967, a position he held for the remainder of his life.

From 1955-1974, Cassels authored the popular column “Religion in America.”1 Cassels was a devoted Christian, and in the last ten years of his life, he wrote over a dozen books that were all dedicated to issues of faith. Some of his notable publications were: Your Bible (1967), The Real Jesus: How He Lived and What He Taught (1968), and The Reality of God (1971).

Throughout his career in journalism, Cassel’s earned a variety of prestigious awards, and his coverage of religious news earned him respect from people of all different faiths. Yet, he never compromised his conviction that truth in religion really mattered. In 1965, he wrote a book titled, What’s the Difference? A Comparison of the Faiths Men Live By, in which he carefully outlined the core doctrines of many religions. In his final chapter, “Does It Matter What You Believe?” he wrote:

“Does it really matter in the long run whether you’re a Christian, a Jew, a Moslem, or a Buddhist? Millions of people today, including many nominal members of Christian churches, are inclined to answer in the negative. They believe that all religions are basically the same, and that ‘one pathway to Truth is as good as another.’ This sounds like a wonderfully broad-minded attitude, and people who hold it usually think they are being quite modern in their approach to religion. In fact, they are simply subscribing to a very old type of religion called syncretism.

“We encounter syncretism repeatedly in the Old Testament of the Bible. When the prophets proclaimed that there is no other God than Jehovah, they were resisting the syncretism of the Babylonian civilization that surrounded Israel. Then, as now, syncretism presented itself as an extremely tolerant and reasonable kind of faith. Babylon was perfectly willing to add Jehovah to its idol-cluttered altars, if the Jews would abandon their claim that He was the only god. Had the Jews not been — in the eyes of their Babylonian neighbors — narrow-minded and fanatical in rejecting these terms, the religion of Judaism would have been simply swallowed up without a trace five thousand years ago.

“Christianity also encountered the temptation of syncretism in its infancy. The Roman civilization into which the Church was born was proud of its open-minded attitude toward all religions. As the historian Edward Gibbon has put it, ‘The various modi of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people equally useful.’ The Romans felt, in other words, that it didn’t matter what a man believed so long as he believed something that would comfort him in battle and keep him reasonably honest. When Christianity first reached Rome, it was accorded a warm reception. The emperor Alexander Severus added a statue of Jesus to his private chapel, which already contained figures of numerous pagan gods. Rome began to persecute the Christian Church only when it fought off the smothering embrace of syncretism, and stubbornly insisted that ‘there is no other name under heaven than Jesus Christ whereby men may be saved.’” 2

Cassels went on to say, “The heart of the Christian faith is the assertion that God has revealed himself in history in the person of Jesus Christ.”3 Truly, the idea that God became a man and walked among his creation is one of the most profound claims of Christianity. In an effort to explain God’s remarkable act, Cassels followed the example of Jesus, who used parables to teach challenging spiritual truths.

Cassels wrote “The Parable of the Birds” and distributed it through UPI (United Press Interna¬tional) in December of 1959. The story appeared in newspapers and on radio broadcasts across the country. It was so popular that it was (and continues to be) reproduced every Christmas. One of the most notable voices to introduce the story on the air was Paul Harvey (the master storyteller of 20th century radio).

In his parable, Cassels addresses some of the significant reasons why God chose to come into the world as a man – to demonstrate his love for people, to show his intimate understanding of human life and to personally deliver the message of salvation. Enjoy this moving story.

Sources:

1 Contemporary Authors. “Louis Cassels.” Gale, 2002. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from Gale Literary Data-bases. Much of the biography for Louis Cassels is drawn from this source.
2 Cassels, Louis. What’s the Difference? A Comparison of the Faiths Men Live By. Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1965, pp. 211-212.
3 Cassels, Louis, pp. 215-216.

*********************

Text of the Story:

Now the man to whom I’m going to introduce you was not a scrooge; he was a kind, decent, mostly good man. He was generous to his family and upright in his dealings with other men. But he just didn’t believe all that stuff about God becoming a man, which the churches proclaim at Christmas time. It just didn’t make sense, and he was too honest to pretend otherwise.

“I’m truly sorry to distress you,” he told his wife, “but I’m not going with you to church this Christmas Eve.” He said he’d feel like a hypocrite and that he would much rather just stay at home. And so he stayed, and they went to the midnight service.

Shortly after the family drove away in the car, snow began to fall. He went to the window to watch the flurries getting heavier and heavier. Then he went back to his fireside chair to read his newspaper. Minutes later he was startled by a thudding sound. Then another and another — sort of a thump or a thud. At first he thought someone must have been throwing snowballs against his living room window.

But when he went to the front door to investigate, he found a flock of birds huddled miserably in the snow. They’d been caught in the storm and, in a desperate search for shelter, had tried to fly through his large landscape window. Well, he couldn’t let the poor creatures lie there and freeze, so he remembered the barn where his children stabled their pony. That would provide a warm shelter, if he could direct the birds to it.

Quickly he put on a coat and galoshes and then he tramped through the deepening snow to the barn. He opened the doors wide and turned on a light, but the birds did not come in. He figured food would entice them. So he hurried back to the house, fetched breadcrumbs and sprinkled them on the snow. He made a trail to the brightly lit, wide-open doorway of the stable. But to his dismay, the birds ignored the breadcrumbs and continued to flap around helplessly in the snow.

He tried catching them. He tried shooing them into the barn by walking around them and waving his arms. Instead, they scattered in every direction, except into the warm, lighted barn. And then he realized that they were afraid of him. To them, he reasoned, I am a strange and terrifying creature. If only I could think of some way to let them know that they can trust me — that I am not trying to hurt them but to help them. But how?

Any move he made tended to frighten and confuse them. They just would not follow. They would not be led or shooed, because they feared him.

“If only I could be a bird,” he thought to himself, “and mingle with them and speak their language. Then I could tell them not to be afraid. Then I could show them the way to the safe warm barn. But I would have to be one of them so they could see and hear and understand.”

At that moment the church bells began to ring. The sound reached his ears above the sounds of the wind. And he stood there listening to the bells pealing the glad tidings of Christmas. And he sank to his knees in the snow.

“Now I understand,” he whispered. “Now I see why you had to do it.

Copyright © 1959 by United Press International/Louis Cassels. Used by permission of United Press International. All rights reserved. Note that the original story was not available. When it was first distributed, editors of newspapers and radio programs freely altered the title and the text in literally hundreds of media outlets across the country. The above version is one that is widely circulated today.
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star

Senior Member
Nov 8, 2017
1,180
1,519
113
North Carolina
#6
I had just put another log on the fire. I noticed, on the near side, two little ants running around in a circle, seemingly trying to find an way to escape the increasing heat and the fire that was beginning to engulf the far side of the log. I found a small scrap of cardboard nearby and touched it to the wood at a point near them. I did this, not because I felt that ants might be sentient, but because I felt a bit of empathy with their plight. They came up to the cardboard, touched and perhaps tasted it, but then to my disappointment turned away and went their own separate ways. At that point I began to feel my glove heating up and had to turn away.

Can we imagine how disappointed God is whenever we do not accept Him through Christ? Even when we do accept Him through Jesus, can we imagine how disappointed He is during those times we do not follow His lead? Just saying.
 

dcontroversal

Senior Member
Dec 12, 2013
45,580
19,340
113
#7
Can we imagine how disappointed God is whenever we do not accept Him through Christ? Even when we do accept Him through Jesus, can we imagine how disappointed He is during those times we do not follow His lead? Just saying.
God takes no pleasure in the death of the wicked.
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
31,371
9,440
113
65
Florida
#8
Leaves me wanting more. :)

What is your point?
I believed that its analogy about rejecting the salvation that was freely offered. The ants made the choice to burned up rather than accept the salvation that was offered.
 

maxwel

Senior Member
Apr 18, 2013
8,655
1,881
113
#9
Willie,

That's an awful lot to read...
you have anything that just pictures?
 

breno785au

Senior Member
Jul 23, 2013
5,617
547
113
Australia
#10
I would've doused the flames in water to save those two poor little ants... They knew not what they were doing :eek:
 

Johnny_B

Senior Member
Mar 18, 2017
1,954
64
48
#11
Can we imagine how disappointed God is whenever we do not accept Him through Christ? Even when we do accept Him through Jesus, can we imagine how disappointed He is during those times we do not follow His lead? Just saying.

That assumes that the Lord does not know all things and is somehow surprised when we do anything. He knows all things and knows that man will never chose Him and that is why He choses us before the foundations of the world and in love predestined us to be His children of His through Jesus, Ephesians 1:3-6

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places,even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and blameless before him. In lovehe predestined us for adoption to himself as sons through Jesus Christ, according to the purpose of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved.”

Has nothing to do with us, it has everything to do with Him and please if you are thinging that is not fair. Do you really want God to be fair, because if He is fair all of mankind would good to hells eternal flames of judgement because of our sinful nature that cannot pleae Him and our hatered towards Him, Romans 8:7-8


“For the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God, for it does not submit to God's law; indeed, it cannot.8 Those who are in the flesh cannot please God.”
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
31,371
9,440
113
65
Florida
#12
I would've doused the flames in water to save those two poor little ants... They knew not what they were doing :eek:
You could sprinkle the burnt ants on a salad. Sorta like bacon bits.
 

OneFaith

Senior Member
Sep 5, 2016
2,203
345
83
#13
Any bugs that come in my house get the death penalty, but I’ll have mercy on them in their own habitat, unless they attack. Those two probably went off to make babies to fill your cupboards lol. But I am glad to see your heart is capable of mercy.

But we are made in God’s image. Jesus died for us, not for bugs, that we have the opportunity to be saved. It is sad that most will not take that opportunity.

 

oyster67

Senior Member
May 24, 2014
3,052
2,643
113
#14
Leaves me wanting more. :)

What is your point?
Verses that come to mind are:

2 Peter 3

3:9 The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.
3:10 But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up.