THE EPIPHANY/MAGI/KING HEROD/OLD COVENENT/ NEW COVENENT

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arthurfleminger

Well-known member
Aug 18, 2021
1,211
638
113
#1
Wow, Christmas is just around the corner, less than a month away. And, during the first week of January, many Christian sects will celebrate the 'Feast of the Epiphany'; to include all the Eastern Orthodox denominations, Anglicans, Lutherans, Catholics, Methodists, and others.

Actually, the Feast of the Epiphany is a very significant observance for Christians around the world. So, let's examine it's significance.

Firstly, understand what an epiphany is. It is a 'moment of sudden/surprising revelation or insight'. So, what is God's Epiphany that is celebrated in January? It is the revelation that Gentiles will be included in God's Plan of Salvation.

Prior to the birth of Christ, only the Jewish people had been included in 'God's Plan of Salvation'. But, with the coming of the Magi, everything changes!!!!!!!!!!!

The Magi are Gentiles, non-Jews, and they are being included in God's Plan of Salvation. The Magi come to search out and find the New King, the Christ, so that they can worship Him and offer Him gifts.

Simultaneously, King Herod, the king of the 'Old Covenant Jews' also seeks to find the newborn Christ, so that he can murder Him.

What is happening is that it is the beginning of the end for the 'Old Covenant' between God and the Jews and the very start of God's Plan of Salvation for the Gentiles.

The Feast of the Epiphany celebrates the Gentiles being included in God's plan.
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
46,175
20,049
113
#3
Epiphany Etymology and original word usage wiki

The word Epiphany is from Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epipháneia, meaning manifestation
or appearance. It is derived from the verb φαίνειν, phainein, meaning "to appear." In
classical Greek it was used for the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but
especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshiper (a theophany). In the Septuagint
the word is used of a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27). In the New
Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ or to
his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to his Second Coming.


Alternative names for the feast in Greek include τα Θεοφάνεια, ta Theopháneia "Theophany"
(a neuter plural rather than feminine singular), η Ημέρα των Φώτων, i Iméra ton Fóton
(modern Greek pronunciation), "The Day of the Lights", and τα Φώτα, ta Fóta, "The Lights."
 

Cameron143

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2022
2,828
1,321
113
60
#4
Epiphany Etymology and original word usage wiki

The word Epiphany is from Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epipháneia, meaning manifestation
or appearance. It is derived from the verb φαίνειν, phainein, meaning "to appear." In
classical Greek it was used for the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but
especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshiper (a theophany). In the Septuagint
the word is used of a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27). In the New
Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ or to
his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to his Second Coming.


Alternative names for the feast in Greek include τα Θεοφάνεια, ta Theopháneia "Theophany"
(a neuter plural rather than feminine singular), η Ημέρα των Φώτων, i Iméra ton Fóton
(modern Greek pronunciation), "The Day of the Lights", and τα Φώτα, ta Fóta, "The Lights."
Whoa! An epiphany about epiphany.
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
7,169
2,322
113
#5
It is so ironic the Jewish people have seven feasts that celebrate each way God gives us for our salvation, with Passover and the birth of Christ at the center. Yet they deny Christ as the Savior. Gentiles have all said the seven feasts are not to be celebrated by Christians, yet here is a feast thought up by man that celebrates salvation, while gentile people deny the celebrations of salvation thought up by God for us.