Was Jesus crucified on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

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What Day was Jesus crucified ?

  • Wednesday

    Votes: 9 45.0%
  • Thursday

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Friday

    Votes: 9 45.0%

  • Total voters
    20
  • Poll closed .
Aug 13, 2014
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Mac4Yuma,

To summarize all that I just read, the ability to calculate the 70 years in Daniel, when Messiah would be born/cut off, when creation was ... is a matter of some debate and depends on how the Jews did their calendar in all of the years in-between. Fortunately, none of this changes the requirement of the 3 full days and 3 full nights being a requirement for Jesus being the Messiah and the N.T. being reliable and trustworthy.
Yes the 72 hours are the most important they prove just who Jesus is.

Take Care
Mac.
 

rstrats

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2011
658
31
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No matter how you regard the three days and three nights one simply cannot get around the fact that scripture tells us he died the evening before the Sabbath - Saturday which means he died Friday evening.
How do you account for the lack of a third night?
 

Grandpa

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2011
10,850
2,743
113
How do you account for the lack of a third night?
It would have been Thursday evening because Friday evening is already Sabbath.

Thursday night, Friday night, Saturday night.
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
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What is a high day sabbath ?
"High Sabbaths" were weekly Sabbaths (Saturdays) that occurred during a festival week.

The 1st and 7th days of festival weeks were also sabbaths, but they were lesser sabbaths. The reason is that the Law allowed certain work to be done on these festival sabbaths, the work that was necessary to prepare the feast for that day (Exodus 12:16). So these sabbaths were less strict, ergo they were "lesser" or "smaller" sabbaths.

However, the law was much more strict about the weekly Sabbath law, that no work of any kind could be done, not even to prepare the feast on a feast day, thus it was a "High Sabbath" because the Sabbath commandment superseded (was higher than) the festival commandments. So on the Preparation (Friday) of a festival week, enough food had to be prepared for 2 days and the people had to rest from all work on the weekly Sabbath.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
Was Jesus crucified on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?:)
Jesus was crucified on a Friday.


Easter Week Chronology
Paschal Week Chronology

6 days before Passover
Friday – Nisan 8 – late afternoon - Jesus arrives in Bethany from Jericho
Friday – Nisan 9 – sunset – Sabbath supper at home of Simon

5 days before Passover
Saturday – Nisan 9 – Sabbath - Jesus rests in Bethany; multitudes come from all over to see Jesus and Lazarus; chief priests and Pharisees plot to arrest both Jesus and Lazarus

4 days before Passover
Sunday – Nisan 10 – Palm Sunday, Jesus enters Jerusalem; lambs selected for Passover; Jesus cleanses Temple for the 2nd time

3 days before Passover
Monday – Nisan 11 – Jesus teaches the multitudes

2 days before Passover
Tuesday – Nisan 12 – Jesus’ denunciation of Jerusalem; Mt. Olivet discourse

1 day before Passover
Wednesday – Nisan 13 - no record in Gospels how Jesus spent the day; possibly in Bethany and last night spent there
Wednesday – Nisan 14 – at sunset Jews begin to search their homes with candles for leaven

Passover
Thursday – Nisan 14 – morning – no leaven eaten after 10:00 a.m.
Thursday – Nisan 14 –noon– leaven ceremonially destroyed by burning or by dispersing to the winds
Thursday – Nisan 14 – afternoon – lambs sacrificed from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Seder prepared

1st Day of Unleavened Bread
Thursday – Nisan 15 – evening – Seder eaten (roasted Passover lamb and 1st Passover Chagigah eaten {breast and shoulder of voluntary thank-offering}); the Lord's Supper instituted
Thursday – Nisan 15 – night – Jesus arrested, brought before priests and elders
Friday – Nisan 15 – morning – Jesus brought before Pilate
Friday – Nisan 15 – 9:00 in the morning – Jesus crucified
Friday – Nisan 15 – 12:00 noon– darkness
Friday – Nisan 15 – 3:00 in the afternoon – Jesus dies
Friday – Nisan 15 – late afternoon – Jesus' body placed in tomb
Friday - Nisan 15 - before sunset women purchase and prepare spices for Jesus' burial (festival sabbaths allowed certain work necessary for preparation for the feasts, shops were allowed to be open to provide pilgrims with necessary items to keep the feast); High Sabbath preparations made

Sabbath (a "High Day")
Friday – Nisan 16 – sunset – High Sabbath begins (2nd feast at which mandatory 2nd Passover Chagigah is eaten which Pharisees would have been excluded from eating had they become defiled that morning)
Friday – Nisan 16 – night – women rest
Saturday – Nisan 16 – Sabbath – women rest
Saturday - Nisan 17 - night - Rabbinic Law requires that work not be resumed during night following Shabbat

1st Day of the Week
Sunday – Nisan 17 – morning early – women come to tomb, Jesus is risen


Primary Sources: The Gospels, Talmudic Tractate "Pesachim," Josephus "Antiquities."Secondary Sources: The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, Alfred Edersheim; The Temple and It's Services, Alfred Edersheim; Jerusalem in the Time of Jesus, Joachim Jeremias; Sketches of Jewish Social Life, Alfred Edersheim; Daily Life in Bible Times, Packer/Tenney/White; Manner and Customs of Bible Times, Ralph Gower and many more.
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
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Saturday 10th (Day)
(Saturday Sabbath) This was when the Passover sacrifice was inspected ...
The lambs for passover were selected and set aside on the 10th day of the month, whatever week day that might fall on. In the year of Jesus' passion it fell on a Sunday, ergo "Palm Sunday."

(Beginning of 14th (Wednesday) - Eve of the Day of Preparation (Passover)) ...
There was no "preparation day" for Passover as the Law (Exodus 12:16) allowed the work necessary to keep the feast to be done on the day of the feast, even on the 1st and 7th days of the feasts, ergo they were lower or lesser sabbaths.

Jesus celebrates the Seudah Mafseket, which literally means Last Supper. This was a Jewish feast celebrating the fast of of the firstborn ...
Matthew, Mark, and Luke all state that Jesus ate the Passover with the rest of the nation in Jerusalem on the evening of Nisan 15, the first day of Unleavened Bread.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 
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Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
Did the Sabbath day start at 6pm or midnite? :) 6pm might make a diff.
Technically, every day ( as well as the beginning of months) began when the observers in Jerusalem were able to discern the first evening star in the eastern sky. This information would then be telegraphed throughout the country via signal fires. When the Jews saw the light of the fire, they would pause for a full minute before prayers and the evening meal to allow the day to have fully begun.

It wasn't until the 4th century that Rabbi Hillel II developed the fixed calendar that is still in use today. But before that, the beginning of years, months, and days was determined by observations made in Israel.

Once the calendar was fixed, the calendar day was considered to have begun at 6:00 p.m., or about sunset.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
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6
.
Is twilight always 6 pm ?
No, twilight in both Hebrew and English refers to the period just after sunset while there is still light, whatever hour on the clock that might occur, and it changes throughout the year, earlier in winter, and later in summer as far as the clock goes.

It is the period also called dusk, and an old term I like is the gloaming.

The ancients didn't have strict time keeping as we do, not having clocks. The day in summer was much longer than the day in winter, sunset varied by as much as 3 hours summer to winter and therefore when twilight would occur would vary as well. For study purposes, we simply divide the day into 12 hours from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and the night likewise, but in reality there was and still is a variance of up to 3 hours in the actual sunrise and sunset and therefore what hour on the clock twilight might occur.

The Hebrew word translated evening is often taken to be referring to this post-sunset period, but what it actually refers to is the period when the sun begins to descend in the sky (12:00 p.m.) until it actually sets (approx 6:00 p.m.). Hebrew doesn't have a word for afternoon. Thus "between the evenings," when the evening sacrifice was made and when the Passover lambs and other festival sacrifices were made, was at 3:00 p.m., or between the time the sun began to go down and the time it actually sank below the horizon.

Unless you understand that the word ereb (evening) in the Bible has a broader meaning than just a particular hour of the day it can be confusing. It can refer to the whole afternoon period from noon to sunset ("from evening to evening"), or it can refer to the period midway between noon and sunset (3:00 p.m. or the time of the evening sacrifice and the time of the evening prayers in the synagogue), or it can refer to the period just before sunset and the ending of the day. Context is key.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
The specific time in Ex. 12 is not particularly specific. However, in Deuteronomy 16:6 the Lord is very specific. "But at the place where the LORD your God chooses to establish His name, you shall sacrifice the Passover in the evening at sunset, at the time that you came out of Egypt." Remember, the Jewish day began at 6:00 P.M. but this does not necessarily mean that this was the exact time of the beginning of the Passover because as you say, sundown is not always at sundown. Jesus' had to have died before sundown preceeding the Sabbath.
Actually, that's a mis-translation. The Hebrew does not say "in the evening at sunset," it says "in the evening, at the going down of the sun." This refers to the period when the sun has passed the zenith and begins to descend or go down in the sky toward the horizon, or 12:00 p.m. Thus the lambs were slain between the time the sun began to go down and the time it actually set, or between 12:00 and 6:00 p.m., or at 3:00 p.m., when Josephus as well as Talmudic tractates on the Passover state that the Passover lambs were slain.

In fact, because of the number of lambs to be slain, the evening sacrifice was backed up and offered at 1:00 p.m. and afterward they immediately began the offerings for the Passover (tens of thousands during New Testament times) until 5:00 p.m. when the last lambs could be slain and still allow time for them to be prepared and roasted in time for the Seder that night.

This translation of the Hebrew ereb as "evening" is confusing but keep in mind that it can refer to the period from noon to sunset or to any period during that time.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
I really don't know, maybe they work the nightshift and or they doesn't want their deeds to be seen, and then they can recuperate from their long busy night before the Master come, but the Master one day will sneak up behind them like a thief and catch them in the act with His flashlight. But I do know that in the beginning that night was here before day, and then God had said," Let there be Light" and which He was actually was referring to, let there be life in this dark, motionless, emptiness.
Because in New Testament times the night was divided into four watches for military purposes. The Temple also kept watches throughout the night, a contingent of priests making regular rounds of the Temple precincts to ensure nothing unclean had managed to steal into the courts, polluting the holy places. The two 3-hour watches after sunset were known as the night watch and the two 3-hour watches before sunrise were known as the morning watch. It was sort of a logical place to divide the 24 hour periods. The orthodox churches still observe these watches as times of prayer.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
Yeah, everybody knows that you can count three days and three nights form Friday sunset to before dawn on Sunday morning.
I think your difficulty may be arising from trying to understand these things based on your interpretation of the phrase "in the heart of the earth" and assuming it means how long Jesus would be in the tomb. I think that is a problem because on numerous occasions Jesus specifically told the disciples that he would be arrested, rejected by the leaders of the nation, would suffer, and would be crucified and rise on the third day, the third day referring to the third day after he suffered all these things, as he repeatedly taught, not the third day after being buried. Certainly that is the understanding of the disciples Jesus encountered on the road to Emmaus on Easter Sunday after his resurrection, they listed all these events, including Jesus being arrested, rejected, suffering being beaten, crucified and hanging on a cross for six hours, plus including the time he was buried, and they said that Sunday was the third day since all those things had happened. So perhaps the problem is in trying to limit the three days to only the hours Jesus was dead and not including the other things he endured at the hands of wicked men. Sunday morning would be the third day after he was arrested Thursday night.

Ever here of the Quartodeciman controversy and Polycarp? from Wikipedia...
I am very familiar with the whole controversy. It was one of the two primary disputes among the churches that caused Constantine to convene the Council of Nicea to debate and settle the issues, the divinity of Jesus being the other issue that was tearing the church apart.


In the mid–second century, the practice in the Roman province of Asia was for the pre-Paschal fast to end and the feast to be held on the 14th day (the full moon) of the Jewish lunar month of Nisan, the date on which the Passover sacrifice had been offered when the Second Temple stood, and "the day when the people put away the leaven".[5] Those who observed this practice were called Quartodecimani, Latin for "fourteenthers", because of holding their celebration on the fourteenth day of Nisan.
I'm afraid that's not quite correct. The problem was that the Quartodecimans were basing their Paschal observance on the Jewish calendar and the ancient date of the Passover on Nisan 14, beginning their feast for the Crucifixion, then celebrating the Resurrection three days later with a feast, whatever day of the week that might fall on. The rest of the churches were observing the Crucifixion on the Friday following the Paschal moon and celebrating the Resurrection on the Paschal Sunday. This created a problem in that churches were fasting while other churches were feasting, which made it impossible for them to fellowship together.

So, Polycarp kept the Passover and Anicetus kept the customs of the presbyters. Guess who won out?
That's a rather biased summation. The Quartodecimans observed the fast and the Lord's Resurrection according to the Jewish calendar (based on Nisan 14), and the rest of the churches observed the fast and the Lord's Resurrection according to the Christian calendar (Sunday following the paschal full moon). That the Christian observance was adopted unanimously at the Council by all the Bishops from all the churches throughout the world is testimony to the rightness of the decision.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
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Please show us how to count this. Take the time for us who have fallen to the "dark side" to enlighten us how to count this scripture...


Mat 12:39 But he answered and said unto them, An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign; and there shall no sign be given to it, but the sign of the prophet Jonas:
Mat 12:40 For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.


Show me the three days and three nights please.
"Now that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. They were talking with each other about everything that had happened. As they talked and discussed these things with each other, Jesus himself came up and walked along with them; but they were kept from recognizing him.

He asked them, “What are you discussing together as you walk along?”

They stood still, their faces downcast. One of them, named Cleopas,asked him, “Are you the only one visiting Jerusalem who does not know the things that have happened there in these days?”

“What things?” he asked.

“About Jesus of Nazareth,” they replied. “He was a prophet, powerful in word and deed before God and all the people. The chief priests and our rulers handed him over to be sentenced to death, and they crucified him ... it is the third day since all this took place."

From the chief priests arresting Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane on Thursday night, to being handed over to be sentenced to death on Friday morning, to being crucified and hanging on a cross for 6 hours on Friday, to being buried on Friday evening, to the resurrection on Sunday morning ... for all this to take place I count three days.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
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Don't know what a high day is huh?

Joh 19:31 The Jews therefore, because it was the preparation, that the bodies should not remain upon the cross on the sabbath day, (for that sabbath day was an high day,) besought Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.

C'mon, don't hand me that, you know good and well what a high day is...

A high day is a Sabbath attached to the Feasts & Festivals of YHWH.
You will note that the first & last days of the 7 day Feasts in Lev 23
are Sabbaths & a high day is a Sabbath that is not a weekly Sabbath.
The one being refered to in John 19:31 is the first day of Unleavened
Bread. This significant because there were 2 Sabbaths that week &
the day that Messiah Y'shua was crucified was before the high day,
which was the evening of Passover.

From a person on Yahooanswers.com.
It might not be a good idea to get doctrine from Yahoo. The sabbath that John was referring to being a high day was the weekly sabbath which commandments superseded the festival commandments. Festival sabbaths were considered lower or lesser sabbaths because on those sabbaths the law allowed certain work to be done, that work which was necessary to eat the feast:

"And in the first day there shall be an holy convocation, and in the seventh day there shall be a holy convocation to you; no manner of work shall be done in them, save that which every man must eat, that only may be done of you." Exodus 12:16

For that reason, these festival sabbaths were considered lesser sabbaths, not as strict as the weekly sabbath when no work could be done at all, not even to prepare a feast on a feast day. And of the three week-long festivals each year, at least one feast day would fall on a weekly Sabbath, and the people would have to prepare enough feast to last for two days, because the weekly Sabbath was a High day and it's commandments could not be violated, not even to prepare for an ordained feast.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
6
Did the ladies buy the spies on the saturday ?
The law allowed the Jews to do that work which was necessary to observe the feast even on the first and seventh days of the feast when other work was not allowed. Because there were so many pilgrims in Jerusalem for the feasts, particularly for the Passover, shops would be open to allow the pilgrims to purchase the necessary items and prepare them for the feasts, especially on the Preparation before the weekly Sabbath when they would need to purchase and prepare the feast for two days. So the shops would have been open on Friday, even though it was the first day of Unleavened Bread and a festival sabbath, offering all the things needed for the feast for two days, as the law itself allowed. After seeing where Jesus' body was laid late on Friday afternoon, the women would have been able to purchase whatever they needed before the shops closed Friday and the Sabbath commenced.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
 
Dec 28, 2016
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The law allowed the Jews to do that work which was necessary to observe the feast even on the first and seventh days of the feast when other work was not allowed. Because there were so many pilgrims in Jerusalem for the feasts, particularly for the Passover, shops would be open to allow the pilgrims to purchase the necessary items and prepare them for the feasts, especially on the Preparation before the weekly Sabbath when they would need to purchase and prepare the feast for two days. So the shops would have been open on Friday, even though it was the first day of Unleavened Bread and a festival sabbath, offering all the things needed for the feast for two days, as the law itself allowed. After seeing where Jesus' body was laid late on Friday afternoon, the women would have been able to purchase whatever they needed before the shops closed Friday and the Sabbath commenced.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
Elect hasn’t been on here since 2015, FYI.
 
Dec 28, 2016
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It might not be a good idea to get doctrine from Yahoo. The sabbath that John was referring to being a high day was the weekly sabbath which commandments superseded the festival commandments. Festival sabbaths were considered lower or lesser sabbaths because on those sabbaths the law allowed certain work to be done, that work which was necessary to eat the feast:

"And in the first day there shall be an holy convocation, and in the seventh day there shall be a holy convocation to you; no manner of work shall be done in them, save that which every man must eat, that only may be done of you." Exodus 12:16

For that reason, these festival sabbaths were considered lesser sabbaths, not as strict as the weekly sabbath when no work could be done at all, not even to prepare a feast on a feast day. And of the three week-long festivals each year, at least one feast day would fall on a weekly Sabbath, and the people would have to prepare enough feast to last for two days, because the weekly Sabbath was a High day and it's commandments could not be violated, not even to prepare for an ordained feast.

In Christ,
Pilgrimer
John832 hasn’t been on here since 9/17/2017.
 

Deade

Called of God
Dec 17, 2017
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yeshuaofisrael.org
The 1st and 7th days of festival weeks were also sabbaths, but they were lesser sabbaths. The reason is that the Law allowed certain work to be done on these festival sabbaths, the work that was necessary to prepare the feast for that day (Exodus 12:16). So these sabbaths were less strict, ergo they were "lesser" or "smaller" sabbaths.
I don't know where you get you information, but annual Sabbaths were not "lesser" Sabbaths as you say. If anything the weekly sabbath [Jews don't cap. the weekly] would be considered lesser. This thread was hashed over and died, now you want to post more misinformation. No thank you.



 

Pilgrimer

Junior Member
Jan 1, 2018
45
0
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I don't know where you get you information, but annual Sabbaths were not "lesser" Sabbaths as you say. If anything the weekly sabbath [Jews don't cap. the weekly] would be considered lesser.


I referenced Exodus 12:16 which states that on the festival sabbaths certain work was allowed to be done, so the festival sabbath commandments were less strict. On weekly sabbaths however, no work at all could be done, not even on a feast day to prepare the feast, thus the weekly sabbath commandments were more strict and Friday continued to be the Preparation when enough food had to be prepared for two days, even during a festival week. This was the way Exodus prescribed the festival sabbaths be observed, it was the practice during Temple times, and is still the common practice in Judaism to this day.

Can you cite any Scripture or can you point to historic or modern-day practice that shows the annuals sabbaths were more holy than (their commandments overrode) the weekly Sabbaths?

And yes, Jews most certainly do capitalize Shabbat (Hebrew word for the weekly Sabbath).

In Christ,
Pilgrimer


Festival sabbaths.PNG [/QUOTE]
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
15,529
7,652
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Jesus was crucified on a Friday.
This is incorrect. Jesus was crucified on Wednesday, the 14th of Nisan, in the year 30 AD. He rose again on the first day of the week (Sunday), the 18th of Nisan.