Should Kids Physically Go Back To School Poll

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Should kids physically go back to school? Explain why.


  • Total voters
    13

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#1
Speaking of mostly public schools. But others may be included as seen fitting.

With Covid, progressive anti God indoctrination, increase in violence, domestic abuse, parents who need school to go to work, some kids only receive good meals and psychological help from their schools, failing education systems in the data, and polls that show freshmen going into college already lean liberal or radical than conservative. 2/3 do not hold the same values as the parents.

Please answer the poll and explain why.

I personally believe they should reopen but parents should try as best they can to home school or at least find a charter school.
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
33,776
11,497
113
66
Tennessee
#2
Kids should absolutely physically go to school. Another thing, having the kids at home during the school year is a tremendous hardship for both parents that must work to support their family. Kids learn valuable social skills when in an actual physical school that they won't learn staring at a computer screen.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#3
Kids should absolutely physically go to school. Another thing, having the kids at home during the school year is a tremendous hardship for both parents that must work to support their family. Kids learn valuable social skills when in an actual physical school that they won't learn staring at a computer screen.
What about home schooling? Homeschooling seems to have a good track record in surpassing public education.

https://howdoihomeschool.com/2018/07/07/homeschool-vs-public-school-test-scores/
 

tourist

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2014
33,776
11,497
113
66
Tennessee
#4
What about home schooling? Homeschooling seems to have a good track record in surpassing public education.

https://howdoihomeschool.com/2018/07/07/homeschool-vs-public-school-test-scores/
Perhaps, but it lacks the social interaction that physically attending school provides. Then again, serious problems if both parents must work to support their family. Also, there may be a difference between choosing to homeschool verses being forced to as the kids are not given a voice in the matter.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#5
Perhaps, but it lacks the social interaction that physically attending school provides. Then again, serious problems if both parents must work to support their family. Also, there may be a difference between choosing to homeschool verses being forced to as the kids are not given a voice in the matter.
Social interaction isn't as difficult as it once was because now we have lots of social programs like Trail Life USA. Plus bad social interaction can cause devastating consequences.

But yes public school should still be available for parents who just cannot make it happen.

I work while my wife stays home so it is possible for us to do so.
 

Godsgirl83

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2019
6,172
4,245
113
#6
so, I'm in the pickle of being in the middle with all this.
On the one hand I have a child who, at this time of their life homeschooling is the best option.
On the other hand, I have a couple kiddos that thrive at traditional school, partly b/c of the social interaction and partly b/c it gives them a break and chance to get away from home, and they focus better in a classroom than at home.
The being thrown unexpectedly into online stuff mid year was not an easy transition for them and I got to see firsthand just how easily distracted they are, which isn't as much as a problem for them in class.
As of right now, (unless things change AGAIN before Sept 1st) our district has decided to do all schooling virtual.
For us this means, the public school system provides the education. I just have to make sure they log in at certain times, and stay on top of assignments and due dates.
Whereas for my homeschooler, I am 100% in charge of whats taught, when and how. Now that's not to hard of a task (IMO) except that I am one who can often over complicate something simple due to all these grand ideas. Lord, help me moving forward with this journey.....
 

Godsgirl83

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2019
6,172
4,245
113
#7

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#8
thanks for the great link.
I find that I often overwhelm myself with all the homeschooling "how to's" and personal blogs floating around out there.
This site I am finding very practical and isn't leading me to jump around from one site to another.
Yah that site seemed to compound the different studies I had read into one location. It is at least a starting point.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#9
so, I'm in the pickle of being in the middle with all this.
On the one hand I have a child who, at this time of their life homeschooling is the best option.
On the other hand, I have a couple kiddos that thrive at traditional school, partly b/c of the social interaction and partly b/c it gives them a break and chance to get away from home, and they focus better in a classroom than at home.
The being thrown unexpectedly into online stuff mid year was not an easy transition for them and I got to see firsthand just how easily distracted they are, which isn't as much as a problem for them in class.
As of right now, (unless things change AGAIN before Sept 1st) our district has decided to do all schooling virtual.
For us this means, the public school system provides the education. I just have to make sure they log in at certain times, and stay on top of assignments and due dates.
Whereas for my homeschooler, I am 100% in charge of whats taught, when and how. Now that's not to hard of a task (IMO) except that I am one who can often over complicate something simple due to all these grand ideas. Lord, help me moving forward with this journey.....
I have a couple kiddos that thrive at traditional school, partly b/c of the social interaction and partly b/c it gives them a break and chance to get away from home, and they focus better in a classroom than at home.
https://homeschoolon.com/20-tips-homeschooling-distracted-child/

Well you would definitely have to include field trips and extracurricular activities to fill the social gaps. Many homeschool families join in groups for sports or activities. Churches can also get involved. Remember most homeschool days can be completed in 2 to 6 hours according to age. So that frees up a lot of extra time for other things.

Whereas for my homeschooler, I am 100% in charge of whats taught, when and how. Now that's not to hard of a task (IMO) except that I am one who can often over complicate something simple due to all these grand ideas. Lord, help me moving forward with this journey....
I love the sound of 100% in charge. If only people knew what many of the teacher lobbies, teacher unions, liberal activist groups, planned parenthood, and the government have their hands in public education. Now kids no longer have books so it easy to hide certain doctrines within the online curriculum. Even in small towns people are surprised to find out what their local public schools teach in science, history, math, reading, sex education, and school policies like promoting gender identity as in if a boy wants to be a girl then teachers must call them the gender they prefer and parents cannot be notified.

I know what you mean about over complicating lol. I accidentally try talking to my kids like they are my age lol.
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
16,657
9,071
113
#10
Perhaps, but it lacks the social interaction that physically attending school provides. Then again, serious problems if both parents must work to support their family. Also, there may be a difference between choosing to homeschool verses being forced to as the kids are not given a voice in the matter.
This is a common concern among those who don't homeschool. If the parents are wise about educating their children, they will have them interacting with other kids as well as adults in a wide variety of contexts. In my experience, homeschooled kids are far better socialized than public-schooled kids. Consider also that public schools emphasize the kind of "socialization" among kids which naturally allows for bullying, shaming, ridicule, verbal and physical abuse, exposure to drugs and sex, and many other ills. It's the blind leading the blind, sadly.
 

SoulWeaver

Senior Member
Oct 25, 2014
4,891
2,521
113
#11
This is a common concern among those who don't homeschool. If the parents are wise about educating their children, they will have them interacting with other kids as well as adults in a wide variety of contexts. In my experience, homeschooled kids are far better socialized than public-schooled kids. Consider also that public schools emphasize the kind of "socialization" among kids which naturally allows for bullying, shaming, ridicule, verbal and physical abuse, exposure to drugs and sex, and many other ills. It's the blind leading the blind, sadly.
Well that's encouraging to hear, that homeschooling may work out great. But I think it also depends upon each individual's environment and family. I watched this recently and I think homeschooling sucked for this girl in video below. Unfortunately, there are many other families just like hers.
I don't miss school myself. It did nothing for my socialization I am not any less awkward because of going to school, it just gave me social anxiety and bullying.

 

Godsgirl83

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2019
6,172
4,245
113
#12
But yes public school should still be available for parents who just cannot make it happen.
With our school district aiming to go virtual in fall, I have many friends who are concerned about this. Both parents work and they use the before and after school care services. We're awaiting our districts final decisions in mid/late Aug. Several families I know have reached out to the district over this matter.

Kids learn valuable social skills when in an actual physical school that they won't learn staring at a computer screen.
I'm not so concerned about the social aspect of virtual learning, but staring at a screen a majority of the day is what concerns me.
I honestly don't feel they will learn as well by doing so. Yes, apps and online games can make learning very engaging and fun; HOWEVER, it has been shown that you learn and retain more with good old fashioned books than you do computer screens.
My kids have very little "screen time" (computers, devices, games, tv) . Virtual schooling is going to throw them into a world of very little electronic time to a few hours a day of electronic time, and that is something I don't like the idea of.
On the other hand, at least they'll be at home and I can access the virtual class to see EVERY THING assigned and make sure they're not forgetting something ( their school has nightly homework books that they are SUPPOSE to write everything in, have looked over and signed nightly....... problem is, they often forget to copy stuff down from the class board. )

https://homeschoolon.com/20-tips-homeschooling-distracted-child/

Well you would definitely have to include field trips and extracurricular activities to fill the social gaps. Many homeschool families join in groups for sports or activities. Churches can also get involved. Remember most homeschool days can be completed in 2 to 6 hours according to age. So that frees up a lot of extra time for other things.
another good link, thanks.
Yeah, field trips are going to be "virtual" for a while too :( we're being told that there won't be any at least for the first quarter, and as far as homeschool field trips, well we'll just have to see what the virtual hours are like then get extra creative to include the whole clan. There are also several homeschool groups to join, in which families can get together for social stuff as well as for pulling resources.

The shorter hours make it wonderful too. My homeschooler is a struggling learner. Even though public school system "accommodated" , it was more on paper than in actuality. When we started out and I said "hey, if we need to take 2 months to really make sure you understand this before moving on, guess what? We can!" There's a lot less frustration with setting our own hours.
I'm in a state that has very few homeschool requirements/laws, but one of those few is the total number of hours for the school year must total 875 hours (any grade) vs the 1,050 hours (grades 1-6) or 1,137 hours (grades 7-12)


Consider also that public schools emphasize the kind of "socialization" among kids which naturally allows for bullying, shaming, ridicule, verbal and physical abuse, exposure to drugs and sex, and many other ills. It's the blind leading the blind, sadly.
Not to mention, public schools often brag about being "bully free zones" but have staff that turns and pretends nothing is wrong when things are pointed out. Kids are mean on the playground. They may seem sweet and like everyones best friend in the classroom, but listen close enough to a group of kids together on the playground and you'll hear teasing and bullying.
 
Jan 25, 2015
7,741
2,060
113
#13
My son's school asked all the parents if they want the children to go to school and an overwhelming majority said yes. Maybe it was just the parents being fed-up with entertaining the kids :ROFL: but they are back at school. Many, many schools in SA are closed due Covid.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
9,986
3,627
113
#14
all schools are open in nz. we were in lockdown earlier so that we could be covid-free.
My school reopened at level 2 when thre was a little risk, but it has gone down to level 1 and things are as normal now quarantine measures are in place for travellers.

we didnt want community transmission. BIbles in schools also restarted in most schools that had them already. I dont think any of our children (at least 350) last count left school to homeschool permantently. Parents just cant do it, they had to go back to work, even if one worked and the other stayed home it was hard on just one to juggle other family commitments. You try teaching as well as looking after babies.

online learning only worked up to a point for the older students (14 and older) and most reported hating being stuck at home with their parents...they wanted to see their friends, and get practical hands learning and group learning too.

IMHO books are better than screens. screens tie up your time and people got zoomed out. I know I did.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#15
This is a common concern among those who don't homeschool. If the parents are wise about educating their children, they will have them interacting with other kids as well as adults in a wide variety of contexts. In my experience, homeschooled kids are far better socialized than public-schooled kids. Consider also that public schools emphasize the kind of "socialization" among kids which naturally allows for bullying, shaming, ridicule, verbal and physical abuse, exposure to drugs and sex, and many other ills. It's the blind leading the blind, sadly.
It is also proven kids do better when they around older people where as compared to kids their age. They will be more mature, respectful, will be challenged by the adult or older siblings to do better. It is also good for the younger children's speech to hear older people talk rather than the babble of same age students.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/int...should-stop-segregating-children-age-part-iii

Seems to be early American education knew what they were doing with classrooms of all ages.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#16
Well that's encouraging to hear, that homeschooling may work out great. But I think it also depends upon each individual's environment and family. I watched this recently and I think homeschooling sucked for this girl in video below. Unfortunately, there are many other families just like hers.
I don't miss school myself. It did nothing for my socialization I am not any less awkward because of going to school, it just gave me social anxiety and bullying.

I truly believe social media and the phone is the reason why people are having social problems.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#17
With our school district aiming to go virtual in fall, I have many friends who are concerned about this. Both parents work and they use the before and after school care services. We're awaiting our districts final decisions in mid/late Aug. Several families I know have reached out to the district over this matter.


I'm not so concerned about the social aspect of virtual learning, but staring at a screen a majority of the day is what concerns me.
I honestly don't feel they will learn as well by doing so. Yes, apps and online games can make learning very engaging and fun; HOWEVER, it has been shown that you learn and retain more with good old fashioned books than you do computer screens.
My kids have very little "screen time" (computers, devices, games, tv) . Virtual schooling is going to throw them into a world of very little electronic time to a few hours a day of electronic time, and that is something I don't like the idea of.
On the other hand, at least they'll be at home and I can access the virtual class to see EVERY THING assigned and make sure they're not forgetting something ( their school has nightly homework books that they are SUPPOSE to write everything in, have looked over and signed nightly....... problem is, they often forget to copy stuff down from the class board. )


another good link, thanks.
Yeah, field trips are going to be "virtual" for a while too :( we're being told that there won't be any at least for the first quarter, and as far as homeschool field trips, well we'll just have to see what the virtual hours are like then get extra creative to include the whole clan. There are also several homeschool groups to join, in which families can get together for social stuff as well as for pulling resources.

The shorter hours make it wonderful too. My homeschooler is a struggling learner. Even though public school system "accommodated" , it was more on paper than in actuality. When we started out and I said "hey, if we need to take 2 months to really make sure you understand this before moving on, guess what? We can!" There's a lot less frustration with setting our own hours.
I'm in a state that has very few homeschool requirements/laws, but one of those few is the total number of hours for the school year must total 875 hours (any grade) vs the 1,050 hours (grades 1-6) or 1,137 hours (grades 7-12)



Not to mention, public schools often brag about being "bully free zones" but have staff that turns and pretends nothing is wrong when things are pointed out. Kids are mean on the playground. They may seem sweet and like everyones best friend in the classroom, but listen close enough to a group of kids together on the playground and you'll hear teasing and bullying.
Yah I wonder what the screen time for public school virtual learning will be compared to homeschool.
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
16,657
9,071
113
#18
I truly believe social media and the phone is the reason why people are having social problems.
That's an interesting theory, but it doesn't hold water. I went to school in the 1970's and 80's, and bullying was rampant. We had no phones and no social media; we just had kids who had not been taught to respect others despite their differences.
 

Roughsoul1991

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2016
5,952
2,775
113
#19
That's an interesting theory, but it doesn't hold water. I went to school in the 1970's and 80's, and bullying was rampant. We had no phones and no social media; we just had kids who had not been taught to respect others despite their differences.
I was talking about as in friendships or dating. Sorry I didn't clarify.