Newer worship songs make me sleepy.. HELP

  • Christian Chat is a moderated online Christian community allowing Christians around the world to fellowship with each other in real time chat via webcam, voice, and text, with the Christian Chat app. You can also start or participate in a Bible-based discussion here in the Christian Chat Forums, where members can also share with each other their own videos, pictures, or favorite Christian music.

    If you are a Christian and need encouragement and fellowship, we're here for you! If you are not a Christian but interested in knowing more about Jesus our Lord, you're also welcome! Want to know what the Bible says, and how you can apply it to your life? Join us!

    To make new Christian friends now around the world, click here to join Christian Chat.

DinoDillinger

Senior Member
Jul 28, 2009
837
17
18
#1
I don't have examples to give you but can anyone relate? I fell in love with some of the newer Christian worship music when I was first saved. That was ten years ago and now the only contemporary Christian music that moves me are the ones I fell in love with back when I first came to Christ.

Honestly, I really like the old hymns now. Some of my issue might be with the lyrics of newer songs. There are a few that I think just have bad theology behind them but even the songs where the lyrics are biblical I end up feeling like they are rocking me to sleep.

Thoughts?
 

Ruby123

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2019
392
288
63
#2
I agree. I like some modern worship songs from Hillsong and Kim Walker but for the past year I have preferred the old hymns. At church we usually start off with modern praise songs and round off with the older hymns. I have noticed the whole church sing them louder and with more passion than the modern worship. It sounds great and you just get lost in it (y)
 

Mission21

Pathfinder
Mar 12, 2019
116
89
28
#3
Good topic/comment.
---
I started my spiritual journey in 1970's.
- During Jesus Movement.
- Early/pioneering days of 'Contemporary Christian Music.'
---
Sometime ago, I talked to Christian musician.
- He has been involved.. from 1970's.
He told me, " anyone can compose songs nowadays..you do not need much effort and time -
because of technology. "
- " That is why it is difficult to find songs with quality / substance. "
 
N

Notes4God

Guest
#4
Good topic/comment.
---
I started my spiritual journey in 1970's.
- During Jesus Movement.
- Early/pioneering days of 'Contemporary Christian Music.'
---
Sometime ago, I talked to Christian musician.
- He has been involved.. from 1970's.
He told me, " anyone can compose songs nowadays..you do not need much effort and time -
because of technology. "
- " That is why it is difficult to find songs with quality / substance. "
 
N

Notes4God

Guest
#6
5 minutes!
----
Special musical skill/talent?
- Or contest ( who can beat my composing time? )
Saying this with sense of humor..

Blessings,
"hallelujah rhymes with hallelujah" :)
 

Robertt

Active member
May 22, 2019
119
36
28
#7
well not unusual to prefer the music we got saved to.

But I just find any music that doesn't make me bop will make me sleepy.

So give it a beat. at least so we can clap along. or do the Pentecostal two step dance to.

And of course Worship in greek is
from <G4314> (pros) and a probably derivative of <G2965> (kuon) (meaning to kiss, like a dog licking his master's hand); to fawn or crouch to, i.e. (literal or figurative) prostrate oneself in homage (do reverence to, adore) :- worship.

don't see that much in church
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
2,564
993
113
#8
I find the newer ones repetitive, like why say things once when you can sing it five times.
I kind figured they did that cos they ran out of words. In secular songs, they would often do that fade to end so they could cut the track. Its filler. Its done for commercial reasons. Then theres a fade out, cos they dont know how to end it on a good note.

Maybe the newer lyricists assume thats how a song is crafted? But really its just lazy musicianship. Also it makes it boring to sing as a congregation.
 
Jul 31, 2013
22,952
4,969
113
#10
I find the newer ones repetitive, like why say things once when you can sing it five times.
I kind figured they did that cos they ran out of words. In secular songs, they would often do that fade to end so they could cut the track. Its filler. Its done for commercial reasons. Then theres a fade out, cos they dont know how to end it on a good note.

Maybe the newer lyricists assume thats how a song is crafted? But really its just lazy musicianship. Also it makes it boring to sing as a congregation.
because the purpose of these is to be used in a service which is often deliberately crafted to elicit emotions from the audience, in order to achieve 'decisions' as a result of the emotional weight & impulse, and to encourage generous monetary donation. in keeping with that goal, it is more effective to reach the broadest audience with the vaguest and simplest mantricly repeated phrases that elicit good feelings and complacent agreement. the same is true of many sermons -- low information content, high emotional content. shallow, non-specific repetition designed to elicit emotional response.

this is in contrast from hymns which were written in order to reinforce doctrinal and theological truths - and likewise different from sermons that are long, information-dense, complex teaching, rather than abbreviated, simple preaching. looking at some of the older hymns, from 100 years ago, they often have 6 or more verses and read like a 5-paragraph essay for a class on soteriology. many worship songs from the last 10 or 20 years on the other had are about 12 lines and read like an assignment for a creative writing / poetry course
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
2,564
993
113
#11
because the purpose of these is to be used in a service which is often deliberately crafted to elicit emotions from the audience, in order to achieve 'decisions' as a result of the emotional weight & impulse, and to encourage generous monetary donation. in keeping with that goal, it is more effective to reach the broadest audience with the vaguest and simplest mantricly repeated phrases that elicit good feelings and complacent agreement. the same is true of many sermons -- low information content, high emotional content. shallow, non-specific repetition designed to elicit emotional response.

this is in contrast from hymns which were written in order to reinforce doctrinal and theological truths - and likewise different from sermons that are long, information-dense, complex teaching, rather than abbreviated, simple preaching. looking at some of the older hymns, from 100 years ago, they often have 6 or more verses and read like a 5-paragraph essay for a class on soteriology. many worship songs from the last 10 or 20 years on the other had are about 12 lines and read like an assignment for a creative writing / poetry course
Hmm ok didnt think of it that way but if you insist. I have never heard a worship song that inspired me to open my wallet. The only song thats come close is the telethon song that went

Thank you very much for your kind donation
Thank you very much
Thank you very very much

Thank you very much for your kind donation
Thank you very very very very much.