George Bush Senior dies at the age of 94

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Solemateleft

Honor, Courage, Commitment
Jun 25, 2017
4,363
2,539
113
#41
All who knew him personally revered him with such high regard and respect:
Former President George H.W. Bush remembered by Northwest DC neighbors
http://www.fox5dc.com/news/local-ne...-hw-bush-remembered-by-northwest-dc-neighbors

'He Has Our Heart': Houston Remembers Their Celebrity Neighbor, George H.W. Bush
https://www.npr.org/2018/12/01/6725...bers-their-celebrity-neighbor-george-h-w-bush

Former neighbor reflects on personal impressions of George H.W. Bush
https://www.wavy.com/news/president...onal-impressions-of-george-hw-bush/1634084896
"There is a lot of evidence from historians, that man he was, the genteel gentleman from Milton, Massachusetts, who went through a lot in his early life," Cignoli said. "All those humbling experiences, the loss of his daughter did have an impact on his legislation, through Congress, as president of the United States."

Cignoli's final thought, "There was that regular personal touch. This was no imperials presidency with this man."
 

Solemateleft

Honor, Courage, Commitment
Jun 25, 2017
4,363
2,539
113
#42
George H.W. Bush Funeral Details Released
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/george-hw-bush-funeral-details_us_5c04131ee4b04fb2116917a8

Former President George H.W. Bush will be laid to rest on Thursday at his presidential library and museum in Texas. Several memorial events have been planned in the days leading up to his final interment.

Bush’s casket will arrive at the U.S. Capitol on Monday at 4:45 p.m., where an arrival ceremony will take place involving both the House and Senate.
The former president will lie in state in the rotunda until Wednesday morning. The public may pay their respects from 7:30 p.m. Eastern time Monday to 8:45 a.m. Eastern time Wednesday.

Wednesday: Washington National Cathedral
1543837991873.png


Bush’s casket will be transported to the Washington National Cathedral on Wednesday, where a memorial service for friends and family will be held at 11 a.m. Eastern.
Following the service, Bush’s casket will return to Joint Base Andrews at 1:15 p.m. Eastern before being flown to Texas.

Wednesday-Thursday: St. Martin’s Episcopal Church
1543838051645.png

Later Wednesday, Bush will lie in repose at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston ― the city he called home for many years ― from 7:45 p.m. Eastern to 6 a.m. Eastern on Thursday, CNN reported.
A memorial service is planned at the church on Thursday at 11 a.m. Eastern, according to CNN.
 
Jul 21, 2018
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#43
Soulmateleft, it's as if you're H W Bush's defense attorney, posting endless links of admiration everyone but God has for him and his earthly accomplishments, as if you think you can appeal to the ultimate Judge and authority, our Heavenly Father, to allow him entrance into Heaven.

Not even Johnnie Cochran is that good of an attorney... The word of God is specific and explicit on what it takes for one to be saved.
 
U

UnderGrace

Guest
#44
What source to you have for that claim UG, generally it was thought to refer to people working in community help situations - but Trump claimed he had no clue what George meant.

More research, okay let me see what I can find.....

......on the other hand you could just believe me.:D
 
J

Jennie-Mae

Guest
#45
Soulmateleft, it's as if you're H W Bush's defense attorney, posting endless links of admiration everyone but God has for him and his earthly accomplishments, as if you think you can appeal to the ultimate Judge and authority, our Heavenly Father, to allow him entrance into Heaven.

Not even Johnnie Cochran is that good of an attorney... The word of God is specific and explicit on what it takes for one to be saved.
Unless you’re the Good Lord Himself, of course, why are you posting things clearly revealing that you don’t know what you’re talking about? Where is your evidence? Why are you right?
 

blue_ladybug

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2014
70,667
9,386
113
#46
Soulmateleft, it's as if you're H W Bush's defense attorney, posting endless links of admiration everyone but God has for him and his earthly accomplishments, as if you think you can appeal to the ultimate Judge and authority, our Heavenly Father, to allow him entrance into Heaven.

Not even Johnnie Cochran is that good of an attorney... The word of God is specific and explicit on what it takes for one to be saved.
Umm, Johnnie Cochran is dead. Has been for quite awhile now..
 

melita916

Senior Member
Aug 12, 2011
10,194
2,385
113
#47
I didn’t know Bush personally. I can’t say whether or not he had a personal relationship with the Lord. I hope he did.

All I know is there is a family in mourning. Friends as well.
 
Jul 21, 2018
62
40
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#48
Unless you’re the Good Lord Himself, of course, why are you posting things clearly revealing that you don’t know what you’re talking about? Where is your evidence? Why are you right?
I mean, I've posted where it spoke of father and son being part of the demonic fraternity. I can link you more if you'd like, but I can't make you read it. Furthermore, why do you think I don't know what I'm talking about? Do you disagree H W Bush was a Bonesman? Do you disagree Christ is the Savior? What exactly are you refuting so I can help you understand better?
 

Lillywolf

Well-known member
Aug 29, 2018
1,562
542
113
#49
Agree, I was a sobbing mess... Praying that I am able to have these kinds of genuinely loving and heavenly conversations and impacts upon my children and future grandkids. What a special man, to have had such an impact upon so many who knew him personally. Our country and the world truly have been blessed thru his service, his generosity, and his example... God bless
Thank you. May God bless you and yours as well.
I know what you mean about sobbing mess. I was describing it to a friend today and we were both blubbering by the time I got to the "we waited for you" part.
 
Jul 21, 2018
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40
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#50
Umm, Johnnie Cochran is dead. Has been for quite awhile now..
lol Okay? Maybe my point went over your head. I meant no one can play defense attorney when God the Father is the ultimate Judge. I used Johnnie Cochran specifically because he is dead, but also because he was able to convince 12 jurors that OJ Simpson was innocent in spite of the stacked evidence showing the contrary.
 

Lillywolf

Well-known member
Aug 29, 2018
1,562
542
113
#51
C-SPAN LIVE NOW with the option to start coverage from the beginning, (Video later), George HW Bush Sr. Casket arrives in D.C.


Christian Post The Faith of George HW Bush

Please let us remember this is a memorial thread. Depraved indifference to the passing of someone, or scurrilous attacks against the character, or empty claims of Satanism, rumor, innuendo, being the Devils vice, are uncalled for among Christians who should have compassion. When we're to love our neighbor as ourselves we fail Christ when we forget that once they're dead.
Let's show some respect. We'll all be dead one day too.
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
684
113
#52
More research, okay let me see what I can find.....

......on the other hand you could just believe me.:D
Not bloody likely.

One article claims he may have "stole" the phrase from C.S. Lewis:

Everyone assumed that presidential speechwriter Peggy Noonan was responsible for its use - and The New York Times quickly identified the probable source: C.S. Lewis's The Magician's Nephew, published in 1955, one of the seven volumes that make up The Chronicles of Narnia, the captivating allegorical fantasies of a parallel universe in which animals talk and Christ assumes the form of a lion. Although written as the sixth book in the series, The Magician's Nephew is actually the prequel: Creation. "One moment there had been nothing but darkness," Lewis wrote, "next moment a thousand, thousand points of light leaped out - single stars, constellations, and planets, brighter and bigger than any in our world."


This appeared persuasive, although Ms. Noonan insisted, and still insists, that she had never read the Narnian literature. "C.S. Lewis used the phrase 'a thousand points of light' in one of his science fiction books," she said in one interview. "[But]I hadn't read it." This denial was credible. No one would confuse Lewis's Narnian fantasies with his science-fiction trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra and That Hideous Strength.

The alternative to Lewis was American novelist Thomas Wolfe, who used the same metaphor twice. In You Can't Go Home Again (1940), he described America as a pasture - "only 3,000 miles from east to west, only 2,000 miles from north to south … where ten thousand points of light pick out the cities, towns and villages." In The Web and the Rock (1939), he wrote: "And instantly, he would see the towns below, now coiling in a thousand fumes of homely smoke, now winking into a thousand points of friendly light." On this basis, in 1989, Chicago columnist Mike Royko accused Mr. Bush and Ms. Noonan of plagiarism - although he soon relented. No one who tried to read one Thomas Wolfe novel, he said, would ever try to read a second.


Another question arises: Did Lewis himself draw on the inspiration of an earlier writer for the metaphor? The arrival in theatres of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the third Narnian big-screen adaptation, provides a perfect time to reveal the original source of Lewis's "thousand points of light."

As it happens, Lewis inspired himself. He first wrote of celestial "points of light" in 1913 - 42 years before the publication of The Magician's Nephew. Preserved in his own handwriting in a school notebook (and published by Don W. King, an American academic, in his 2001 anthology C.S. Lewis, Poet), Lewis had written: "In winter when the frosty nights are long …/ Ten thousand, thousand points of light did peep/ Out of the boundless heaven's velvet deep."

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opi...of-a-thousand-points-of-light/article4083615/

^^ G&M - right leaning source, so automatically I would dismiss the above as fake speculation to throw off the scent of Masonry in the accompanying dust cloud.
 
Jul 21, 2018
62
40
18
#53
C-SPAN LIVE (Video later) George Bush Sr. Casket arrives in D.C.


Christian Post The Faith of George HW Bush

Please let us remember this is a memorial thread. Depraved indifference to the passing of someone, or scurrilous attacks against the character, or empty claims of Satanism, rumor, innuendo, being the Devils vice, are uncalled for among Christians who should have compassion. When we're to love our neighbor as ourselves we fail Christ when we forget that once they're dead.
Let's show some respect. We'll all be dead one day too.
100% of everyone that has posted, to my knowledge, are hopeful and wishful in that H W Bush accepted God as his Savior. This is the news section where a thread was posted about the death of a former Bonesman/president of the US... this is not an alter to worship him, free of any factual criticisms. However "empty" you think the claims are, there is undeniable proof he was a Bonesman. Perhaps where we disagree is that you don't think the Skull and Bones fraternity practices demonic rituals/worshiping. That's fine, you can bury your head in the sand and ignore the plethora of evidence showing their fraternity is anything but Christian. Feel free to think Obama was born in the US, OJ was innocent, Lee Harvey Oswalt killed JFK, and Hillary not washing hard drives on her server. It doesn't change what is actually true, nor does it make those claims "empty".
 
J

Jennie-Mae

Guest
#54
I mean, I've posted where it spoke of father and son being part of the demonic fraternity. I can link you more if you'd like, but I can't make you read it. Furthermore, why do you think I don't know what I'm talking about? Do you disagree H W Bush was a Bonesman? Do you disagree Christ is the Savior? What exactly are you refuting so I can help you understand better?
If you say so.
 

Lillywolf

Well-known member
Aug 29, 2018
1,562
542
113
#55
Please let us not feed MurderHomicide.
Please let us remember this is a memorial thread. Depraved indifference to the passing of someone, or scurrilous attacks against the character, or empty claims of Satanism, rumor, innuendo, being the Devils vice, are uncalled for among Christians who should have compassion. When we're to love our neighbor as ourselves we fail Christ when we forget that once they're dead.
Let's show some respect. We'll all be dead one day too.
 

Solemateleft

Honor, Courage, Commitment
Jun 25, 2017
4,363
2,539
113
#56
George H. W. Bush's near-death experience during WWII
USA TODAY

Published on Dec 2, 2016

Neil Bush, son of President George H. W. Bush, recalls stories from his father's service in the Navy during World War II. Including the time he was forced to bail out of his plane while fighting in enemy territory. Unfortunately, his crew members did not survive...


President George H.W. Bush's legacy remembered at National Naval Aviation Museum
https://www.krqe.com/news/president...-at-national-naval-aviation-museum/1634988860
 
U

UnderGrace

Guest
#57
Not bloody likely.

One article claims he may have "stole" the phrase from C.S. Lewis:

Everyone assumed that presidential speechwriter Peggy Noonan was responsible for its use - and The New York Times quickly identified the probable source: C.S. Lewis's The Magician's Nephew, published in 1955, one of the seven volumes that make up The Chronicles of Narnia, the captivating allegorical fantasies of a parallel universe in which animals talk and Christ assumes the form of a lion. Although written as the sixth book in the series, The Magician's Nephew is actually the prequel: Creation. "One moment there had been nothing but darkness," Lewis wrote, "next moment a thousand, thousand points of light leaped out - single stars, constellations, and planets, brighter and bigger than any in our world."


This appeared persuasive, although Ms. Noonan insisted, and still insists, that she had never read the Narnian literature. "C.S. Lewis used the phrase 'a thousand points of light' in one of his science fiction books," she said in one interview. "[But]I hadn't read it." This denial was credible. No one would confuse Lewis's Narnian fantasies with his science-fiction trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra and That Hideous Strength.

The alternative to Lewis was American novelist Thomas Wolfe, who used the same metaphor twice. In You Can't Go Home Again (1940), he described America as a pasture - "only 3,000 miles from east to west, only 2,000 miles from north to south … where ten thousand points of light pick out the cities, towns and villages." In The Web and the Rock (1939), he wrote: "And instantly, he would see the towns below, now coiling in a thousand fumes of homely smoke, now winking into a thousand points of friendly light." On this basis, in 1989, Chicago columnist Mike Royko accused Mr. Bush and Ms. Noonan of plagiarism - although he soon relented. No one who tried to read one Thomas Wolfe novel, he said, would ever try to read a second.


Another question arises: Did Lewis himself draw on the inspiration of an earlier writer for the metaphor? The arrival in theatres of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the third Narnian big-screen adaptation, provides a perfect time to reveal the original source of Lewis's "thousand points of light."

As it happens, Lewis inspired himself. He first wrote of celestial "points of light" in 1913 - 42 years before the publication of The Magician's Nephew. Preserved in his own handwriting in a school notebook (and published by Don W. King, an American academic, in his 2001 anthology C.S. Lewis, Poet), Lewis had written: "In winter when the frosty nights are long …/ Ten thousand, thousand points of light did peep/ Out of the boundless heaven's velvet deep."

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opi...of-a-thousand-points-of-light/article4083615/

^^ G&M - right leaning source, so automatically I would dismiss the above as fake speculation to throw off the scent of Masonry in the accompanying dust cloud.
Now to uncover what those people (the elite, the cabal) actually mean when they talk, one would have to drill much further down then that, it is indeed a very deep rabbit hole.

Interesting though.
 
U

UnderGrace

Guest
#59
I would need to check youtube for the verbal statements however I believe these are the two references.

‘I will keep America moving forward, ever forward for an enduring dream and a thousand points of light?’

And later, during his State of the Union Address, when he mysteriously told the nation that our goal must be ‘the illumination of mankind by a thousand points of light?’


Not bloody likely.

One article claims he may have "stole" the phrase from C.S. Lewis:

Everyone assumed that presidential speechwriter Peggy Noonan was responsible for its use - and The New York Times quickly identified the probable source: C.S. Lewis's The Magician's Nephew, published in 1955, one of the seven volumes that make up The Chronicles of Narnia, the captivating allegorical fantasies of a parallel universe in which animals talk and Christ assumes the form of a lion. Although written as the sixth book in the series, The Magician's Nephew is actually the prequel: Creation. "One moment there had been nothing but darkness," Lewis wrote, "next moment a thousand, thousand points of light leaped out - single stars, constellations, and planets, brighter and bigger than any in our world."


This appeared persuasive, although Ms. Noonan insisted, and still insists, that she had never read the Narnian literature. "C.S. Lewis used the phrase 'a thousand points of light' in one of his science fiction books," she said in one interview. "[But]I hadn't read it." This denial was credible. No one would confuse Lewis's Narnian fantasies with his science-fiction trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra and That Hideous Strength.

The alternative to Lewis was American novelist Thomas Wolfe, who used the same metaphor twice. In You Can't Go Home Again (1940), he described America as a pasture - "only 3,000 miles from east to west, only 2,000 miles from north to south … where ten thousand points of light pick out the cities, towns and villages." In The Web and the Rock (1939), he wrote: "And instantly, he would see the towns below, now coiling in a thousand fumes of homely smoke, now winking into a thousand points of friendly light." On this basis, in 1989, Chicago columnist Mike Royko accused Mr. Bush and Ms. Noonan of plagiarism - although he soon relented. No one who tried to read one Thomas Wolfe novel, he said, would ever try to read a second.


Another question arises: Did Lewis himself draw on the inspiration of an earlier writer for the metaphor? The arrival in theatres of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the third Narnian big-screen adaptation, provides a perfect time to reveal the original source of Lewis's "thousand points of light."

As it happens, Lewis inspired himself. He first wrote of celestial "points of light" in 1913 - 42 years before the publication of The Magician's Nephew. Preserved in his own handwriting in a school notebook (and published by Don W. King, an American academic, in his 2001 anthology C.S. Lewis, Poet), Lewis had written: "In winter when the frosty nights are long …/ Ten thousand, thousand points of light did peep/ Out of the boundless heaven's velvet deep."

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opi...of-a-thousand-points-of-light/article4083615/

^^ G&M - right leaning source, so automatically I would dismiss the above as fake speculation to throw off the scent of Masonry in the accompanying dust cloud.
 

Solemateleft

Honor, Courage, Commitment
Jun 25, 2017
4,363
2,539
113
#60
George H.W. Bush helped lead GOP toward evangelicalism

Faith played a significant role throughout the life of the 41st president.
1543879466580.png
George H.W. Bush, who died Friday, was a lifetime Episcopalian, part of the blue blood of America’s founding Christianity. But as a presidential candidate, he was part of a Republican opening to evangelicalism that changed the country’s landscape.

A bombing mission that plunged him into the Pacific Ocean during World War II and his younger daughter’s death from leukemia were among the times when he said he looked to God and prayer.

Bush attended Christ Episcopal Church in Greenwich, Conn., as a child. His father, Prescott Bush, was a Republican senator from Connecticut. The future president’s mother, Dorothy Walker, would read to her family from the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer.

[George H.W. Bush, 41st president of the United States, dies at 94]

“He was Episcopalian by tradition. His mother was extremely devout, read all the books. And he loved his mother and so he loved the tradition,” said Doug Wead, who co-authored the 1988 book, “George Bush, Man of Integrity,” with Bush and served as a special assistant to the president, told The Washington Post in April.

The seaside St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, in Kennebunkport, Maine, has been a site for family weddings. The Rev. Billy Graham also was invited to preach there, as he wrote in his book, “Just As I Am.”

A Washington Post story in 1988 quoted George H.W. Bush’s cousin, George Herbert Walker III, as saying the president espoused “a happy Christianity, rarely dwelling on suffering or sin. It was upbeat, ‘Do your duty,’ ‘It’s a great world out there.’ ”

['I have no fear of death' -- Barbara Bush on faith and finality]

Bush was asked throughout his life about his faith in God, and he also tied some memories of historical events to prayer and God. He was still a student at Phillips Academy, a boarding school with a Calvinistic background in Andover, Mass., on Dec. 7, 1941.

“We had been to chapel, the mandatory chapel service. Came out of the chapel and was walking across the campus there when somebody said Pearl Harbor has been bombed,” he told CNN in 2012.

One of his most frequently cited faith moments was after a September 1944 bombing mission. Bush, a naval aviator, parachuted into the Pacific Ocean after his plane was damaged. Bush has been quoted as saying he wondered: “Why had I been spared and what did God have for me?”

“He definitely felt that his experience in World War II was a spiritual moment for him,” Wead said. “He definitely had something happen there ... and [had] several other experiences through his life. When he would be asked about whether he was born again, he’d say, ‘I didn’t have one specific moment above all others that I can point to where everything turned around, I had several.’ And that rescue in World War II was one of them.”

He and his wife, Barbara, married in 1945 at First Presbyterian Church in Barbara’s hometown of Rye, N.Y. When they moved to Texas in the early 1950s, they first joined a Presbyterian church, according to the book “Religion and the Oval Office” by Gary Scott Smith.

The book quotes Bush as saying that the couple’s faith “truly sustained us” after their daughter, Robin, died of leukemia at age 3 in 1953.

Bush was one of 11 presidents who identified as Episcopalian, according to the Pew Research Center. In Houston, where George H.W. Bush and Barbara Bush moved in 1960, they attended St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, where her private funeral was held this spring.

[Remember when the White House had faith?]

Bush began to talk about his religious beliefs in public as a presidential candidate. He had to touch on the increasing evangelical movement, Wead says, and the discussion when he was vice president was how he could build a relationship with and show respect to the evangelical movement.

“I soon discovered that, in my opinion, he was on a spiritual journey,” Wead says. “At first it looked like it was all politics … the more I began to realize, he’s defining what he himself believes, and sharpening that, and based on what other people believe and these other traditions and these other philosophies and these other theologies.”

As a candidate for president in 1988, Bush ran against Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis, who supported abortion rights.

During the second presidential debate, on Oct. 13, 1988, Bush said: “I think human life is very, very precious. And, look, this hasn’t been an easy decision for me to meet. I know others disagree with it. But when I was in that little church across the river from Washington and saw our grandchild christened in our faith, I was very pleased indeed that the mother had not aborted that child, and put the child up for adoption [son Marvin Bush and his wife, Margaret, adopted two children]. And so I just feel this is where I’m coming from. And it is personal. And I don’t assail [Michael Dukakis] on that issue, or others on that issue. But that’s the way I, George Bush, feel about it.”

While the Bush family has had both conservative and liberal views on reproductive health and birth control, Ronald M. Green, a professor emeritus for the study of ethics and human values at Dartmouth College, says the Bush family has led, to some extent, the movement of patrician Republicans from centrist thinking to conservative Christian opposition to birth control, abortion and research on reproductive health, such as the use of stem cells or fetal tissue in transplantation.

“G.H.W. started this movement and the politically active sons accentuated it,” says Green, who has followed the Bush family on bioethics issues for 28 years.

Smith’s book “Religion in the Oval Office” notes that Bush celebrated the nation’s Judeo-Christian heritage and he viewed family and faith as America’s “moral compass.”

When Bush accepted the presidential nomination in 1988, his address to the Republican National Convention included these comments: “I am guided by certain traditions. One is that there’s a God, and He is good and His love, while free, has a self-imposed cost: We must be good to one another.”

During his presidency from 1989 to 1993, Bush attended St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. In his 1989 inaugural address, he said his first act as the nation’s 41st president would be to pray.

“I ask you to bow your heads,” he said. “Heavenly Father, we bow our heads and thank You for Your love. Accept our thanks for the peace that yields this day and the shared faith that makes its continuance likely. Make us strong to do Your work, willing to heed and hear Your will, and write on our hearts these words: ‘Use power to help people.’ For we are given power not to advance our own purposes, nor to make a great show in the world, nor a name. There is but one just use of power, and it is to serve people. Help us remember, Lord. Amen.”

He closed his remarks by saying, “I do not fear what is ahead. For our problems are large, but our heart is larger. Our challenges are great, but our will is greater. And if our flaws are endless, God's love is truly boundless.”

He mentioned prayer in 220 speeches, remarks and proclamations while president, wrote Smith, also the author of “Faith and the Presidency: From George Washington to George W. Bush” and a fellow for faith and politics in the Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College, a Christian liberal arts school in Pennsylvania.

In his Thanksgiving Day remarks on 1990, Bush discussed the nation’s faith heritage, saying, “The grand experiment called America is but a recent manifestation of humanity’s timeless yearning to be free. Only in freedom can we achieve humanity’s greatest hope: peace. From the wisdom of Solomon to the wonder of the Sermon on the Mount, from the prophecies of Isaiah to the teachings of Islam, the holy books that are our common heritage speak often of the many blessings bestowed upon mankind, often of the love of liberty, often of the cause of peace.”

But other speeches were memorable for his stumbles around the topic of faith.

In 1982, an address to the Episcopal Church’s triennial general conference was “a disaster,” as he used his remarks to defend the Reagan administration’s arms policy, John E. Booty, a professor of Anglican Studies at the University of the South in Tennessee, told The Washington Post in 1988.

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