I hate this part right here......

  • Christian Chat is a moderated online Christian community allowing Christians around the world to fellowship with each other in real time chat via webcam, voice, and text, with the Christian Chat app. You can also start or participate in a Bible-based discussion here in the Christian Chat Forums, where members can also share with each other their own videos, pictures, or favorite Christian music.

    If you are a Christian and need encouragement and fellowship, we're here for you! If you are not a Christian but interested in knowing more about Jesus our Lord, you're also welcome! Want to know what the Bible says, and how you can apply it to your life? Join us!

    To make new Christian friends now around the world, click here to join Christian Chat.

Pipp

Majestic Llamacorn
Sep 17, 2013
4,414
1,048
113
#1
I don't know if anyone has ever heard the song mentioned above by the Pussycat Dolls years and years ago. The song it basically talking about a girl wanting to break up with a guy that wants to hold on to the relationship hence the words "I hate this part right here, I just can't take his tears" (something like that)
But to me... every time I heard that song playing ... I jokingly pointed to something about myself I hated and sang "I hate this part right here" whether it was my freckles, crooked teeth, overweight body.... it was ALWAYS something .

Fast forward 18, 19 years... I'm now a 35 year old woman and I no longer hate myself. Yes I still have many many flaws, but I have realized that everyone is different, everyone has their struggles ... it's part of life.

I said all that to ask this..... are their things growing up that you disliked about yourself that you never thought you'd get over, but now you embrace/accept ?

Here are mine ...

1 . My crooked teeth. When we were growing up we weren't dirt poor, but we were in the lower income group in life. My dad was a carpenter which had no medical insurance and braces cost as much as a new car, so I wasn't able to have them fixed. When I was younger I got called a few names by a few bullies, but it was never a huge deal. I've since realized that yes, my teeth are crooked , but they're perfectly equally crooked on top and bottom , so they perfectly match... lol its weird but I don't mind it at all anymore.
2. My weight. Yes , I still battle being overweight , but... I'm actively working on getting healthier and I feel pretty okay just being me .
3. My freckles. I know I mention this one a lot , but yall don't realize how bad I was picked on as a kid. I was told it looked like I had poop on my face in front of the whole class and for a kid.... that was pretty embarrassing . It was so bad that I make a concoction I read about using buttermilk and lemon juice and tried to fade them...it just made my face stink.. lol then when I was like 19 I spent the entire summer hiding from the sun just to avoid getting more . They faded a good bit by the end of summer and honestly I kinda missed them a little...I didn't look quite like me and it made me a little sad instead of happy. Long story short ...I now just count them as my polkadot's.
4. My green eyes. I guess since all my family has green eyes ...I thought they were boring and everyone had them . One day I read that less then 2% of the world's population have green eyes and it made me feel kinda unique...lol


There's probably more things I could mention , but no one wants to read a novel about my life lol.

How about you ??? Anything you now appreciate that in the past you thought was gonna ruin your life ?
 

JustEli

Well-known member
Dec 23, 2018
624
451
63
44
#2
Once a girl told me I wasn't like my friends, that I was different.
That crushed me.
Took quite a while to realize she meant it as
a compliment.
I had classic low self-esteem throughout Jr high and high school.
 
Feb 6, 2019
122
127
43
#3
Wow , that’s quite a post, i also have crooked teeth that’s why I never show the pearly whites in photos, funny thing is I paid for both my twins to have braces, but they are well worth it! I was also chubby and people picked on me and it hurt! I made some changes and I’m in a good place as well, thanks for sharing your story. It’s inspirational. God bless!
 

BrotherMike

Junior Member
Jan 8, 2018
429
491
63
#4
Growing up I knew I was different.... much more mature than my peers. Old soul. I think back then I was more worried what people thought of me vs now I don’t think about that anymore. I’ve embraced who God made me and all I can do is try my best with the energy God gave me. Thank you for sharing your story. It’s a blessing getting to know people here who are real and honest.
 
Feb 6, 2019
122
127
43
#5
Growing up I knew I was different.... much more mature than my peers. Old soul. I think back then I was more worried what people thought of me vs now I don’t think about that anymore. I’ve embraced who God made me and all I can do is try my best with the energy God gave me. Thank you for sharing your story. It’s a blessing getting to know people here who are real and honest.[/QU. Amen brother!
 
Feb 6, 2019
122
127
43
#6
Amen, we have become different in Christ, I’m still amazed at what He has done for me, may God bless you in your works!
 
Feb 6, 2019
122
127
43
#7
I know I’m a sinner, I pray God forgives me, thank you for your love.
 

Dan58

Senior Member
Nov 13, 2013
1,898
220
63
#8
Appearance is more important when your young, but insecurities tend to fade as you age.. When your young, vanity and pride about your looks are important, you want to fit in, be attractive, and desired.. But the realization that those things are superficial and short lived set-in with time. You learn to be content with your flaws, don't care what others think, and grow to see that beauty is more than skin deep. You work with what you got, but you can't change a Volkswagen into a Cadillac.
 

Mel85

Daughter of the True King
Mar 28, 2018
7,722
3,938
113
#9
Growing up I knew I was different.... much more mature than my peers. Old soul. I think back then I was more worried what people thought of me vs now I don’t think about that anymore. I’ve embraced who God made me and all I can do is try my best with the energy God gave me. Thank you for sharing your story. It’s a blessing getting to know people here who are real and honest.
One of my colleagues is like that, he’s 25 but definitely acts more mature than his age, id say he acts like a 35 year old. Old soul indeed, but nothing wrong with it :) funny that he doesn’t have Facebook like most millennials would lol.
 

BrotherMike

Junior Member
Jan 8, 2018
429
491
63
#10
One of my colleagues is like that, he’s 25 but definitely acts more mature than his age, id say he acts like a 35 year old. Old soul indeed, but nothing wrong with it :) funny that he doesn’t have Facebook like most millennials would lol.
Yeah I thought about shutting down social media. All a bunch of ads and overrated. There’s always email to keep up with the ones important to you :)
 

BrotherMike

Junior Member
Jan 8, 2018
429
491
63
#11
Yeah I thought about shutting down social media. All a bunch of ads and overrated. There’s always email to keep up with the ones important to you :)
Maybe not overrated just a lot of politics and scare tactics...
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
14,025
1,814
113
#12
Every time I looked into
A mirror on a wall
I began to make a list
Of every tiny flaw

 

seoulsearch

OutWrite Trouble
May 23, 2009
11,460
1,638
113
#13
Hey Pippy, great thread!

I know this might sound strange and a bit controversial, but I have never liked being Asian.

Now, I think being Asian is a wonderful thing--for other Asians. But for myself, being adopted by white parents (which confuses the bazooka out of people) in a small, all-white, narrow-minded town always made me wish, you guessed it, that I was white. If I had to live among white people, why couldn't I at least look like them?

I was fine inside my own family--but being around everyone else made me feel like God had made me "wrong". One of my best friends is African American and always says I'm "the whitest white girl" he has ever known. :D

Is is possible to have a racial identity crisis? I guess that's what I have. I get tired of having kids (sometimes even to this day) "slant" their eyes at me and so forth. I get tired of older white people asking me if my name is Mei Ling or if I speak English, etc. (and I know my examples are nothing compared to what most other people go through, so I'm definitely not trying to sound like, "Oh, poor me," but rather, just to voice a few frustrations.)

I was talking with my nephews the other day about whether kids make fun of them and how they react. I was hoping they wouldn't encounter such things, being in a more diverse area, but, alas--people are people wherever you go. My Mom was telling them about the time a little girl in church kept turning around and looking at me... and then finally "slanted" her eyes at me--and my Mom gave her a look like she was going to hope over the pew and choke her. Lol... Good times. :rolleyes:

I have always felt like God made me a white girl on the inside but for some reason, put me into the "wrong" shell. I know this is just my own warped thinking, and also a sin of discontentment. Interestingly, I don't think my black friend has ever wanted to be white and I don't think my white friends who grew up in all-black areas ever wanted to be black, so maybe it's just me.

The one thing I'm grateful for is that I think it helps me understand those who say they are gay or transgender, etc. I know it's not a sin to be any certain race, but I can relate to the part about wanting to be something God didn't make us to be. I pray for them, and that their hearts will be content with the way God has made them, just as I have to make that prayer for myself.

I realize it's just plain sin, and the only answer is to repent and thank God for His wisdom in making us who we are.

Maybe I'm just taking a little longer to get there than most others.
 

Mel85

Daughter of the True King
Mar 28, 2018
7,722
3,938
113
#14
Hey Pippy, great thread!

I know this might sound strange and a bit controversial, but I have never liked being Asian.

Now, I think being Asian is a wonderful thing--for other Asians. But for myself, being adopted by white parents (which confuses the bazooka out of people) in a small, all-white, narrow-minded town always made me wish, you guessed it, that I was white. If I had to live among white people, why couldn't I at least look like them?

I was fine inside my own family--but being around everyone else made me feel like God had made me "wrong". One of my best friends is African American and always says I'm "the whitest white girl" he has ever known. :D

Is is possible to have a racial identity crisis? I guess that's what I have. I get tired of having kids (sometimes even to this day) "slant" their eyes at me and so forth. I get tired of older white people asking me if my name is Mei Ling or if I speak English, etc. (and I know my examples are nothing compared to what most other people go through, so I'm definitely not trying to sound like, "Oh, poor me," but rather, just to voice a few frustrations.)

I was talking with my nephews the other day about whether kids make fun of them and how they react. I was hoping they wouldn't encounter such things, being in a more diverse area, but, alas--people are people wherever you go. My Mom was telling them about the time a little girl in church kept turning around and looking at me... and then finally "slanted" her eyes at me--and my Mom gave her a look like she was going to hope over the pew and choke her. Lol... Good times. :rolleyes:

I have always felt like God made me a white girl on the inside but for some reason, put me into the "wrong" shell. I know this is just my own warped thinking, and also a sin of discontentment. Interestingly, I don't think my black friend has ever wanted to be white and I don't think my white friends who grew up in all-black areas ever wanted to be black, so maybe it's just me.

The one thing I'm grateful for is that I think it helps me understand those who say they are gay or transgender, etc. I know it's not a sin to be any certain race, but I can relate to the part about wanting to be something God didn't make us to be. I pray for them, and that their hearts will be content with the way God has made them, just as I have to make that prayer for myself.

I realize it's just plain sin, and the only answer is to repent and thank God for His wisdom in making us who we are.

Maybe I'm just taking a little longer to get there than most others.
Wait, you’re Asian?! Hehe.

Thanks for sharing sis :)
 
J

jbrooks5912

Guest
#15
Hey Pippy, great thread!

I know this might sound strange and a bit controversial, but I have never liked being Asian.

Now, I think being Asian is a wonderful thing--for other Asians. But for myself, being adopted by white parents (which confuses the bazooka out of people) in a small, all-white, narrow-minded town always made me wish, you guessed it, that I was white. If I had to live among white people, why couldn't I at least look like them?

I was fine inside my own family--but being around everyone else made me feel like God had made me "wrong". One of my best friends is African American and always says I'm "the whitest white girl" he has ever known. :D

Is is possible to have a racial identity crisis? I guess that's what I have. I get tired of having kids (sometimes even to this day) "slant" their eyes at me and so forth. I get tired of older white people asking me if my name is Mei Ling or if I speak English, etc. (and I know my examples are nothing compared to what most other people go through, so I'm definitely not trying to sound like, "Oh, poor me," but rather, just to voice a few frustrations.)

I was talking with my nephews the other day about whether kids make fun of them and how they react. I was hoping they wouldn't encounter such things, being in a more diverse area, but, alas--people are people wherever you go. My Mom was telling them about the time a little girl in church kept turning around and looking at me... and then finally "slanted" her eyes at me--and my Mom gave her a look like she was going to hope over the pew and choke her. Lol... Good times. :rolleyes:

I have always felt like God made me a white girl on the inside but for some reason, put me into the "wrong" shell. I know this is just my own warped thinking, and also a sin of discontentment. Interestingly, I don't think my black friend has ever wanted to be white and I don't think my white friends who grew up in all-black areas ever wanted to be black, so maybe it's just me.

The one thing I'm grateful for is that I think it helps me understand those who say they are gay or transgender, etc. I know it's not a sin to be any certain race, but I can relate to the part about wanting to be something God didn't make us to be. I pray for them, and that their hearts will be content with the way God has made them, just as I have to make that prayer for myself.

I realize it's just plain sin, and the only answer is to repent and thank God for His wisdom in making us who we are.

Maybe I'm just taking a little longer to get there than most others.
Lol u dont like beind asian? I only read that first few lines. I dont need to ready more at this point because i want to say this even tho i sense you already know this and already see it. God made you who you are because it is how he sees you. A culture is nothing compared to God and His heart.

Maybe you do not like certain qualities but that is judgment on yourself and this world makes you do it because of how the devil is.

Plus you were made to be flawless and you are because that is how God creates something becayse his love and compassion equals flawless.

He said come as you are, never did He say to come as the world sees you. Too many people down themselves by how they look that is a worldly trait dang even i have done it myself.

Women dont like me because of the way i was. This is because i had no confidense in myself and it was never about how i looked.

God is working on my heart and all of that is starting to fade away. ANd that tells me that for one i was wrong in how i was with myself.

Instead of being scared to talk to a woman now i go up and ask how she is doing.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
14,025
1,814
113
#16
Is is possible to have a racial identity crisis? I guess that's what I have. I get tired of having kids (sometimes even to this day) "slant" their eyes at me and so forth. I get tired of older white people asking me if my name is Mei Ling or if I speak English, etc.
Tell them your name is Hong Kong Phooey. :D

I'm reminded of a story about a minor bureaucrat who was attending a big state dinner, and he was asked to accompany a distinguished elder official from India, you know, sit beside him and be sociable. The guy had no idea what to say or even how to talk to somebody from India, but he assumed the foreigner didn't know how to speak english so he spent most of the dinner being awkward. When the orchestra started playing he made a feeble comment about "Tra la la... good eh?" When the food came he said, "Yum yum yum... good eh?"

When everybody was through eating and it was time for somebody to give a speech, the official from India bowed to his awkward companion, excused himself and went up to give a speech in perfect english. Then he sat down again, turned to the minor bureaucrat and said, "Blah blah blah... good eh?"



Only other thing I have to observe is, don't let other people's confusion about racial stereotypes determine what you are or what you think you should be. You can be british and talk like a hoodrat, and you can be asian and act white. "People of this physical appearance act like this" is all stereotypes anyway. Let them be confused. It'll give them something to puzzle over.
 

Hamarr

Well-known member
Oct 28, 2018
556
609
93
#17
Hmmmm well, this thread makes me glad I have never had to deal with an identity issue of the racial variety.

I do have a hard time accepting myself while being so overweight. I think I have used my weight as a reason to not get out and enjoy life as much as I could. Sometimes when I do try to not worry about it and show up to something, someone there makes a remark about it. 😛

Getting blood sugar sorted out and losing weight is a pain. I have lost 40 lbs from a year ago, but it feels really slow going. The only thing that works for me is keto.

I do try to be grateful that my body works otherwise. I haven’t done it in a couple of years, but I used to do 5ks during the summer. I’ve gone hiking for 10 mile round trips to get some pictures with a friend. I’ll definitely feel it the next few days after, but I am grateful to still get out and have fun.
 
J

jbrooks5912

Guest
#18
Hmmmm well, this thread makes me glad I have never had to deal with an identity issue of the racial variety.

I do have a hard time accepting myself while being so overweight. I think I have used my weight as a reason to not get out and enjoy life as much as I could. Sometimes when I do try to not worry about it and show up to something, someone there makes a remark about it. 😛

Getting blood sugar sorted out and losing weight is a pain. I have lost 40 lbs from a year ago, but it feels really slow going. The only thing that works for me is keto.

I do try to be grateful that my body works otherwise. I haven’t done it in a couple of years, but I used to do 5ks during the summer. I’ve gone hiking for 10 mile round trips to get some pictures with a friend. I’ll definitely feel it the next few days after, but I am grateful to still get out and have fun.
I understand the whole thing with the blood sugar. Im hypo and it trully bites. God and Life always has a way to either get out attention or show us the real picture.

Stay strong and stay focused on that goal 😁🙃 God Bless!
 

Miri

The Thingy Member
Jul 22, 2012
8,908
1,856
113
UK age 50
#19
I don't know if anyone has ever heard the song mentioned above by the Pussycat Dolls years and years ago. The song it basically talking about a girl wanting to break up with a guy that wants to hold on to the relationship hence the words "I hate this part right here, I just can't take his tears" (something like that)
But to me... every time I heard that song playing ... I jokingly pointed to something about myself I hated and sang "I hate this part right here" whether it was my freckles, crooked teeth, overweight body.... it was ALWAYS something .

Fast forward 18, 19 years... I'm now a 35 year old woman and I no longer hate myself. Yes I still have many many flaws, but I have realized that everyone is different, everyone has their struggles ... it's part of life.

I said all that to ask this..... are their things growing up that you disliked about yourself that you never thought you'd get over, but now you embrace/accept ?

Here are mine ...

1 . My crooked teeth. When we were growing up we weren't dirt poor, but we were in the lower income group in life. My dad was a carpenter which had no medical insurance and braces cost as much as a new car, so I wasn't able to have them fixed. When I was younger I got called a few names by a few bullies, but it was never a huge deal. I've since realized that yes, my teeth are crooked , but they're perfectly equally crooked on top and bottom , so they perfectly match... lol its weird but I don't mind it at all anymore.
2. My weight. Yes , I still battle being overweight , but... I'm actively working on getting healthier and I feel pretty okay just being me .
3. My freckles. I know I mention this one a lot , but yall don't realize how bad I was picked on as a kid. I was told it looked like I had poop on my face in front of the whole class and for a kid.... that was pretty embarrassing . It was so bad that I make a concoction I read about using buttermilk and lemon juice and tried to fade them...it just made my face stink.. lol then when I was like 19 I spent the entire summer hiding from the sun just to avoid getting more . They faded a good bit by the end of summer and honestly I kinda missed them a little...I didn't look quite like me and it made me a little sad instead of happy. Long story short ...I now just count them as my polkadot's.
4. My green eyes. I guess since all my family has green eyes ...I thought they were boring and everyone had them . One day I read that less then 2% of the world's population have green eyes and it made me feel kinda unique...lol


There's probably more things I could mention , but no one wants to read a novel about my life lol.

How about you ??? Anything you now appreciate that in the past you thought was gonna ruin your life ?

Pip you are beautiful and definately look younger than 35.♥️
 

Miri

The Thingy Member
Jul 22, 2012
8,908
1,856
113
UK age 50
#20
Hey Pippy, great thread!

I know this might sound strange and a bit controversial, but I have never liked being Asian.

Now, I think being Asian is a wonderful thing--for other Asians. But for myself, being adopted by white parents (which confuses the bazooka out of people) in a small, all-white, narrow-minded town always made me wish, you guessed it, that I was white. If I had to live among white people, why couldn't I at least look like them?

I was fine inside my own family--but being around everyone else made me feel like God had made me "wrong". One of my best friends is African American and always says I'm "the whitest white girl" he has ever known. :D

Is is possible to have a racial identity crisis? I guess that's what I have. I get tired of having kids (sometimes even to this day) "slant" their eyes at me and so forth. I get tired of older white people asking me if my name is Mei Ling or if I speak English, etc. (and I know my examples are nothing compared to what most other people go through, so I'm definitely not trying to sound like, "Oh, poor me," but rather, just to voice a few frustrations.)

I was talking with my nephews the other day about whether kids make fun of them and how they react. I was hoping they wouldn't encounter such things, being in a more diverse area, but, alas--people are people wherever you go. My Mom was telling them about the time a little girl in church kept turning around and looking at me... and then finally "slanted" her eyes at me--and my Mom gave her a look like she was going to hope over the pew and choke her. Lol... Good times. :rolleyes:

I have always felt like God made me a white girl on the inside but for some reason, put me into the "wrong" shell. I know this is just my own warped thinking, and also a sin of discontentment. Interestingly, I don't think my black friend has ever wanted to be white and I don't think my white friends who grew up in all-black areas ever wanted to be black, so maybe it's just me.

The one thing I'm grateful for is that I think it helps me understand those who say they are gay or transgender, etc. I know it's not a sin to be any certain race, but I can relate to the part about wanting to be something God didn't make us to be. I pray for them, and that their hearts will be content with the way God has made them, just as I have to make that prayer for myself.

I realize it's just plain sin, and the only answer is to repent and thank God for His wisdom in making us who we are.

Maybe I'm just taking a little longer to get there than most others.

I felt very much the same being mixed race.

I count myself as white with a nice sun tan.
I was brought up in a white British family and within
a white culture. My mum and maternal grandparents are british and white.

But because I’m not white on the outside, people didn’t treat me as white.

Even now I hate those question which ask what culture are you.
White
Black
Mixed etc

I want to scream white at the top of my lungs that’s what I am but no one
believes me. So I leave the question blank.

Ages ago I had a hosp appointment with a self service book in screen.
I noticed me medical records listed me as Indian. But that is an assumption
someone has incorrectly made at some point. I was very annoyed and asked
for it to be changed. It’s still not been amended.


A few weeks ago we had a missionary weekend in church, at one point
people were asked to speak to someone from a different country and share a
bit about themselves. I stood there like a lemon not knowing who to speak to.

Various white British people came to speak to me and asked where I was from.
I said I’m british and you could see the confused look on their faces.