Singles Forum Math Problem of the Day! (Please Show Your Work.)

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seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
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#1
Hey Singles!

A long time ago, there were some people who posted various math problems they were working on (usually word problems that had a story), and several members were not only able to solve the problems but also explain exactly how they got their answer.

I am NOT a math person at all, but I LOVED watching people strut their brainy stuff and show us all how it's done...

So although I don't have an interesting story to tell, I do have a math problem that I'm hoping all our number-crunchers out there can demystify and solve.

I am currently working on a sewing pattern that will require approximately 1 2/3 yards of 45" fabric.

However, I'm interested in using a fabric that's 60" wide instead.

So... How much fabric will I need?

The basic problem is: 1 2/3 yards (length) of 45-inch fabric (width) will be equal to how many yards (what length) of fabric that is 60 inches wide?

I sat down and tried to write out the conversion myself and all I came up with... was a whole lot of frustration! I couldn't even find that particular conversion on a chart when I tried Googling it (and I tried looking at 3 charts, but maybe I just missed it).

However, what I'd really like to do is learn how to write out and solve a problem like this for myself!

Any takers? This isn't a contest :p, so everyone is welcome to give it a go, no matter how many times we might see the same answer and methods used (believe me, it will take that many repetitions for me to learn how to do it!)

If at all possible, please show your work so we can see how you came up with the answer and possibly learn your method on our own.

I'm really looking forward to seeing who (if anyone? :() gives it a go. :)

And, I also hope that your day "adds up" to being very blessed. <3

Thanks in advance!
 
Jun 24, 2017
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#2
I take it you mean to cut a comparable amount of area (square inches)? Other wise you would still need 1 2/3 yards of the 60" fabric as well.


Area A: 1 2/3 yards= 5 feet = 60 inches x 45 inches wide = 2700 square inches

Area B: 2700 square inches/60 inches of width= 45 inches or 3.75 feet of length. The answer is just over a yard.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
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546
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#3
In real life the answer will depend on what you are sewing. Material around the edges will be trimmed off, and unless you can fit the trimmed piece into the work somewhere else it will just be waste.

Also, I NEVER show math work. I do it all in my head. It drove 80% of my math teachers crazy but I always got the right answer so they always finally gave up.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
12,897
546
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#4
Also, in a pure mathematical problem Conversationand is right. First step is to get everything into inches. Then you can multiply and divide.
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
83
#5
I take it you mean to cut a comparable amount of area (square inches)? Other wise you would still need 1 2/3 yards of the 60" fabric as well.


Area A: 1 2/3 yards= 5 feet = 60 inches x 45 inches wide = 2700 square inches

Area B: 2700 square inches/60 inches of width= 45 inches or 3.75 feet of length. The answer is just over a yard.
Ah, yes.

And now you can see why I am totally inept at math. :rolleyes:

Thank you for explaining it thoroughly... I wasn't even thinking about area... just width and length...

Ok. So come to think of it... how does area (square inches) differ from length and width?

I'd still love to see people's answers (as in, how they came up with the answer) as explained to an obvious math-challenged person.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
12,897
546
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#6
Area is length times width. If you have a front yard 50 feet wide and 30 feet long, the area is 1500 square feet. That means if you put boxes down on your yard and each box was one foot wide and one foot long, your yard could hold 1500 of those little dudes.
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
83
#7
In real life the answer will depend on what you are sewing. Material around the edges will be trimmed off, and unless you can fit the trimmed piece into the work somewhere else it will just be waste.
This first dimension is for the layout of the pattern, so you basically need one solid block to lay out all the pattern pieces on. You're right though, in that it can be tricky. You'd never think a simple pair of gym shorts could be so complicated (I want to make my own because I'm tired of seeing "Booty Flash" and "Booty Call" as being the only two styles offered in stores.)

However, the fabric I'm using has a "nap" (like velvet--you can brush it one way and it takes on one shade; brush it the other, and it looks completely different) and you can't just slap them anywhere in order to save fabric--each piece has to be placed in the same direction, and that takes up more space.

Also, I NEVER show math work. I do it all in my head. It drove 80% of my math teachers crazy but I always got the right answer so they always finally gave up.
Well then... I can see how much help YOU'RE going to be in helping me become a more mathematically-inclined person. :rolleyes:
 
Aug 2, 2009
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#8
Nevermind the calcualtion I wrote... I calculated how much 60" x 1 2/3yds of fabric would be by mistake. :p
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
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546
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#9
Or for fabric, "area" would be exactly how much fabric is in your hand. If you have 5 feet of fabric, that's a length. That tells nothing about the width. It could be 5 feet long by 2 inches wide, or it could be 5 feet long by 5 feet wide. But if you say you have 25 square feet of fabric, that's the same amount of fabric no matter which way it's wide or long.
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
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#10
Nevermind the calcualtion I wrote... I calculated how much 60" x 1 2/3yds of fabric would be by mistake. :p
Aw...

That's ok, Zero. I was trying to look at your answer before it disappeared.

I hope people will still keep posting answers and explanations because I love watching how people think things through.

And, despite myself... I might even learn something. Grr... :mad:
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
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#11
I would like to open this thread up to anyone else who has a dilemma they need help with too.

In the past, we've had people ask for help with their homework ,etc.

So if there's something you're puzzling over, feel free to post it here--because as you can see, we have some very cool people here who are willing to help. :)
 
Aug 2, 2009
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773
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#12
Ok here's the right calc..

1 2/3yds = 60in

60in x 45in = 2700sq. in. (or 18.75 sqft)

2700sqin divided by 60in = 45in

You'll need 45inches of 60" material...

(this makes sense because 1 2/3yd is 60"... so 45"x60" is what you started with... you just turned it on its side... 60"x45" :p)
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
12,897
546
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#13
Sure I got questions. Which car insurance company REALLY saves me the most money?

The way they all claim to save you money, I've about figured the best thing to do is rapidly switch between several companies over and over. By the time I'm done, at the rate they claim to save me money, THEY will wind up paying ME to have their insurance. :p
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
5,393
779
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#14
Without reading anyone else's post, I came up with this...

1 yard is 36 inches, or three feet, so it follows that 1 and 2/3 yards is 60 inches. You used 60 inches of 45-inch material, so you will need 45 inches of 60-inch material.
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
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#15
Sure I got questions. Which car insurance company REALLY saves me the most money?

The way they all claim to save you money, I've about figured the best thing to do is rapidly switch between several companies over and over. By the time I'm done, at the rate they claim to save me money, THEY will wind up paying ME to have their insurance. :p
This is actually a very valid and pertinent question.

Ok everyone... Best ideas for saving money on car insurance?

I've thought of switching but my family has an insurance agent who knows my parents in person, is familiar with our situations, and is willing to work with us on policies that fit what we need. Sometimes I'm willing to pay a little more for personal service.


I don't mind how much the thread derails if someone is being helped. I had actually thought of writing kind of a "Singles Helping Singles" thread (but of course, the marrieds would be invited to post here), but why not run the protocol here. :)

P.S. I totally love seeing people think, calculate, and come up with answers.

I may have to scour the internet--or my fabric stash--for a new math problem to post every week.

I love the fact that to most others in the world, a lot of us here are nerds and/or have skills others have made fun of us for... But here in the Singles Forum, that's one of the coolest things you can be (not a requirement, of course, but very cool.) :cool:
 
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Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
5,393
779
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#16
This is actually a very valid and pertinent question.

Ok everyone... Best ideas for saving money on car insurance?

Bicycle, bus pass, your own two feet.

Otherwise, I'll leave it to the 'Murrcans to answer. :)
 
Jun 24, 2017
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#17
Well, I'm struggling between answering the question and allowing people to participate, which is no doubt your aim. Even though I can't help but assume you've already answered the question for yourself and are using it to bait conversation, I must indulge myself. Lynx is right, a straight comparison of area will not do in this instance. What needs to be taken into account is the length and width of each pattern to be cut and those divided somewhat categorically by width first (ie: patterns that are wider than half of the width of the material go in their own category because you can't put two of them beside each other.) Using this method and adding a set amount to the length and widths of each cut for padding, you could maximize the efficiency of your placement. However the human brain is great and can do all of this visually without a bunch of math, so my solution would be to lay out your patterns on top of the fabric and then cut the length of fabric you need.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
12,897
546
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#18
Well I'm with Progressive, they haven't done me wrong yet. I backed into the side of a friend's car a couple years ago and I called them up and got them to take care of it. My friend is that elderly lady I mentioned before that our family kind of adopted after her husband died. Next time I saw her she was full of praise for Progressive, they handled everything, had a rental car waiting for her at the mechanic shop, etc.

But I was just curious because my grandma's TV keeps showing advertisement for all kinds of car insurance, and the big claim they all make is how much money they save you.
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
10,821
436
83
#19
Here's another dilemma for all you math whizzes out there...

Seoulsearch hates lima beans. Two lima beans on her plate would just be too many lima beans to try to stomach.

Therefore, how many ounces of lima beans will Seoulsearch be having at dinner?

(Yes. This is a trick question.)
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
12,897
546
113
#20
Half a gallon. And she'll be playing music tonight. :p