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HealthAndHappiness

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2022
3,760
1,573
113
Almost Heaven West Virginia
#21
Some people learn foreign languages by watching old TV shows. Others get the Duolingo or Babble app, but this is free.

Sorry Magenta (not too sorry though;) ,
I had to post a joke for my Canadian friends up north. At least it wasn't Red green. 😄
 
Jan 19, 2023
100
58
28
Australia
#22
For the Aussie accent, you turn your "A" sounds to "I."

For example: G'dye, mite.

It is the opposite in Canada, where we turn "I" sounds to "A."

Example: Turn rate here. Or, Whose turn is it to wape the dishes?

:giggle:
It’s funny how different parts of Australia have different accents. We used to laugh at our cousins interstate pronouncing words differently like scheel instead of school. Some of it rubbed off onto us, like “Hey” at the end of a sentence. As for the farmers accent, so different again.
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
46,175
20,044
113
#24
It’s funny how different parts of Australia have different accents. We used to laugh at our cousins interstate pronouncing words differently like scheel instead of school. Some of it rubbed off onto us, like “Hey” at the end of a sentence. As for the farmers accent, so different again.
Interjecting "eh?" into sentences is very common for some Canadian folks, also. Or it can be a sentence unto itself LOL. I left my home province in my early twenties, and it was nowhere near as common on the west coast, so my saying it so much seemed to really stand out to me, and I worked at weeding it out of my vocabulary. And when I really listen to how many in my family speak, it is almost difficult to reckon that we were brought up in the same home, because they retain much of the eastern accents, which I mostly do not. For instance, I would never say "malk" for milk. I don't think I ever did!!! But some in my family do, and one sister when she was visiting, claimed she had no accent, but I detected one and pointed it out to her, and after considering it for some time (over night) she admitted that I was right:D It was the rate-right thing! :giggle:
 
Jan 19, 2023
100
58
28
Australia
#25
Interjecting "eh?" into sentences is very common for some Canadian folks, also. Or it can be a sentence unto itself LOL. I left my home province in my early twenties, and it was nowhere near as common on the west coast, so my saying it so much seemed to really stand out to me, and I worked at weeding it out of my vocabulary. And when I really listen to how many in my family speak, it is almost difficult to reckon that we were brought up in the same home, because they retain much of the eastern accents, which I mostly do not. For instance, I would never say "malk" for milk. I don't think I ever did!!! But some in my family do, and one sister when she was visiting, claimed she had no accent, but I detected one and pointed it out to her, and after considering it for some time (over night) she admitted that I was right:D It was the rate-right thing! :giggle:
I left my home city/state in my early twenties and a complete stranger asked me where was my accent from. 😂
And as my children were growing up they tried to correct my pronunciation 😂, Mum it’s plaant not plarrnt.
Later years when my daughter went to work in the USA, they told her she had an accent, she strongly objected until she returned to Australia and laughed so much when she heard the Australians.
 

HealthAndHappiness

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2022
3,760
1,573
113
Almost Heaven West Virginia
#26
Interjecting "eh?" into sentences is very common for some Canadian folks, also. Or it can be a sentence unto itself LOL. I left my home province in my early twenties, and it was nowhere near as common on the west coast, so my saying it so much seemed to really stand out to me, and I worked at weeding it out of my vocabulary. And when I really listen to how many in my family speak, it is almost difficult to reckon that we were brought up in the same home, because they retain much of the eastern accents, which I mostly do not. For instance, I would never say "malk" for milk. I don't think I ever did!!! But some in my family do, and one sister when she was visiting, claimed she had no accent, but I detected one and pointed it out to her, and after considering it for some time (over night) she admitted that I was right:D It was the rate-right thing! :giggle: