Christians and Halloween

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mustaphadrink

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2013
1,987
371
83
#41
Hello Truth7t7, it's true that it is a big Lutheran holiday, particularly in western Europe, but it was a regular cause of celebration and thanksgiving when I was a Presbyterian here is the States too, and the same has been true since I became associated with the Evangelical Free Church of America I am happy to report (at least in my local churches anyway).


"Harvest Festivals" were celebrated in lieu of Halloween in my last two local, EvFree churches, but neither church made it seem like a Halloween replacement. We had pony rides, hayrides, apple dunking, and other stuff like that, along with a short message and prayer, music and food, of course. The fact that it is fun is about the only thing that is similar, except that our Harvest Festivals are FAR more fun than Halloween could ever hope to be :) (and the focus is on the Lord, not on the prince of this world and/or his worshipers).


But those things are not true of Christmas, even for those involved in a nearly secular version of it. Restaurants and bars are all closed (except for some of our Chinese restaurants), so most people gather together with family and friends to celebrate it, and go to church on Christmas Eve, even many who do not go to church on any other day of the year (at least that has been my lifelong experience anyway).


I always thought the same thing, but it appears that belief is actually a ~disputed~ fact. You can read some of what has been said about it below, if you are interested (BTW, the text and the text of the video are the same, so you can watch it or listen to it and read it (y)).

Question: Was Jesus born on December 25?
Answer: Speculation as to the time of Jesus’ birth dates back to the 3rd century, when Hyppolytus (ca. 170-236) claimed that Jesus was born on December 25. The earliest mention of some sort of observance on that date is in the Philoclian Calendar, representing Roman practice, of the year 336. Later, John Chrysostom favored the same date of birth. Cyril of Jerusalem (348-386) had access to the original Roman birth census, which also documented that Jesus was born on the 25th of December. The date eventually became the officially recognized date for Christmas in part because it coincided with the pagan festivals celebrating Saturnalia and the winter solstice. The church thereby offered people a Christian alternative to the pagan festivities and eventually reinterpreted many of their symbols and actions in ways acceptable to Christian faith and practice.
December 25 has become more and more acceptable as the birth date of Jesus. However, some argue that the birth occurred in some other season, such as in the fall. Followers of this theory claim that the Judean winters were too cold for shepherds to be watching their flocks by night. History proves otherwise, however, and we have historical evidence that unblemished lambs for the Temple sacrifice were in fact kept in the fields near Bethlehem during the winter months. With that said, it is impossible to prove whether or not Jesus was born on December 25. And, ultimately, it does not matter.
The truth is we simply don’t know the exact date of our Savior’s birth. In fact, we don’t even know for sure the year in which He was born. Scholars believe it was somewhere between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. One thing is clear: if God felt it was important for us to know the exact date of the Savior’s birth, He certainly would have told us in His Word. The Gospel of Luke gives very specific details about the event, even down to what the baby was wearing – “swaddling clothes”—and where he slept—“in a manger” (Luke 2:12). These details are important because they speak of His nature and character, meek and lowly. But the exact date of His birth has no significance whatsoever, which may be why God chose not to mention it.
The fact is that He was born, that He came into the world to atone for our sins, that He was resurrected to eternal life, and that He’s alive today. This is what we should celebrate, as we are told in the Old Testament in such passages as Zechariah 2:10: “’shout and be glad, O Daughter of Zion. For I am coming, and I will live among you,' declares the LORD.” Further, the angel that announced the birth to the shepherds brought “good news of great joy that will be for all the people” (Luke 2:10). Surely here is the cause for celebration every day, not just once a year.

~Deut
To put it simply, Jesus was not born on December 25th because the testimony of the shepherds proves this. December is winter in Israel and there is often snow on the ground. A shepherd who knows what he is doing would not take sheep out into such uninviting weather. They would have them corraled somewhere warm and protected. Apart from the fact that a good shepherd sleeps at the entrance to where the sheep are. Basically, no shepherd sleeps outside in the winter.

The best guess I have seen in all the discussion about this is sometime in April.
 
Jan 25, 2015
9,213
3,189
113
#42
To put it simply, Jesus was not born on December 25th because the testimony of the shepherds proves this. December is winter in Israel and there is often snow on the ground. A shepherd who knows what he is doing would not take sheep out into such uninviting weather. They would have them corraled somewhere warm and protected. Apart from the fact that a good shepherd sleeps at the entrance to where the sheep are. Basically, no shepherd sleeps outside in the winter.

The best guess I have seen in all the discussion about this is sometime in April.
Watch the video I shared. There are people that calculated all of these things without guess work.
 

Deuteronomy

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2018
3,246
3,579
113
67
#43
Hello @GandalfTheWhite, for what it’s worth, I believe the point that the GotQuestions.org article/video holds as most important is the fact that Jesus WAS born, and that the day He was born on is inconsequential (which is good, since no one truly knows what day it was anyway).

His birth is certainly worth celebrating (whichever day of the year it actually falls on), though I believe it’s nice to have a day* to point to, particularly for those who do not know Him!

*(His birth, as the article points out, is actually worth celebrating EVERY day, and I agree and also believe that it is, collectively anyway, by those of us who truly know Him)

~Deut
p.s. - I look forward to watching the video you posted for us. Thanks!
 

Truth7t7

Well-known member
May 19, 2020
7,685
2,492
113
#44
Hello Truth7t7, it's true that it is a big Lutheran holiday, particularly in western Europe, but it was a regular cause of celebration and thanksgiving when I was a Presbyterian here is the States too, and the same has been true since I became associated with the Evangelical Free Church of America I am happy to report (at least in my local churches anyway).


"Harvest Festivals" were celebrated in lieu of Halloween in my last two local, EvFree churches, but neither church made it seem like a Halloween replacement. We had pony rides, hayrides, apple dunking, and other stuff like that, along with a short message and prayer, music and food, of course. The fact that it is fun is about the only thing that is similar, except that our Harvest Festivals are FAR more fun than Halloween could ever hope to be :) (and the focus is on the Lord, not on the prince of this world and/or his worshipers).


But those things are not true of Christmas, even for those involved in a nearly secular version of it. Restaurants and bars are all closed (except for some of our Chinese restaurants), so most people gather together with family and friends to celebrate it, and go to church on Christmas Eve, even many who do not go to church on any other day of the year (at least that has been my lifelong experience anyway).


I always thought the same thing, but it appears that belief is actually a ~disputed~ fact. You can read some of what has been said about it below, if you are interested (BTW, the text and the text of the video are the same, so you can watch it or listen to it and read it (y)).

Question: Was Jesus born on December 25?
Answer: Speculation as to the time of Jesus’ birth dates back to the 3rd century, when Hyppolytus (ca. 170-236) claimed that Jesus was born on December 25. The earliest mention of some sort of observance on that date is in the Philoclian Calendar, representing Roman practice, of the year 336. Later, John Chrysostom favored the same date of birth. Cyril of Jerusalem (348-386) had access to the original Roman birth census, which also documented that Jesus was born on the 25th of December. The date eventually became the officially recognized date for Christmas in part because it coincided with the pagan festivals celebrating Saturnalia and the winter solstice. The church thereby offered people a Christian alternative to the pagan festivities and eventually reinterpreted many of their symbols and actions in ways acceptable to Christian faith and practice.
December 25 has become more and more acceptable as the birth date of Jesus. However, some argue that the birth occurred in some other season, such as in the fall. Followers of this theory claim that the Judean winters were too cold for shepherds to be watching their flocks by night. History proves otherwise, however, and we have historical evidence that unblemished lambs for the Temple sacrifice were in fact kept in the fields near Bethlehem during the winter months. With that said, it is impossible to prove whether or not Jesus was born on December 25. And, ultimately, it does not matter.
The truth is we simply don’t know the exact date of our Savior’s birth. In fact, we don’t even know for sure the year in which He was born. Scholars believe it was somewhere between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. One thing is clear: if God felt it was important for us to know the exact date of the Savior’s birth, He certainly would have told us in His Word. The Gospel of Luke gives very specific details about the event, even down to what the baby was wearing – “swaddling clothes”—and where he slept—“in a manger” (Luke 2:12). These details are important because they speak of His nature and character, meek and lowly. But the exact date of His birth has no significance whatsoever, which may be why God chose not to mention it.
The fact is that He was born, that He came into the world to atone for our sins, that He was resurrected to eternal life, and that He’s alive today. This is what we should celebrate, as we are told in the Old Testament in such passages as Zechariah 2:10: “’shout and be glad, O Daughter of Zion. For I am coming, and I will live among you,' declares the LORD.” Further, the angel that announced the birth to the shepherds brought “good news of great joy that will be for all the people” (Luke 2:10). Surely here is the cause for celebration every day, not just once a year.

~Deut
Thanks for the response :)

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not The Birth (Christmas)

Not The Resurrection (Easter)

But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
 
Last edited:
Jan 25, 2015
9,213
3,189
113
#45
Hello @GandalfTheWhite, for what it’s worth, I believe the point that the GotQuestions.org article/video holds as most important is the fact that Jesus WAS born, and that the day He was born on is inconsequential (which is good, since no one truly knows what day it was anyway).

His birth is certainly worth celebrating (whichever day of the year it actually falls on), though I believe it’s nice to have a day* to point to, particularly for those who do not know Him!

*(His birth, as the article points out, is actually worth celebrating EVERY day, and I agree and also believe that it is, collectively anyway, by those of us who truly know Him)

~Deut
p.s. - I look forward to watching the video you posted for us. Thanks!
I had my fair share of debating should we or should we not keep Christmas on CC. If I come across these threads now I will make my view be known and then I am out of there. Nothing good has ever come from debating this and people can get defensive quickly when defending their views :D;).
 
Jan 25, 2015
9,213
3,189
113
#46
Thanks for the response :)

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not The Birth (Christmas)

Not The Resurrection (Easter)

But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
His death and resurrection was Easter :)
 

Truth7t7

Well-known member
May 19, 2020
7,685
2,492
113
#47
His death and resurrection was Easter :)
Once Again, In Bold Red :)

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not The Birth (Christmas)

Not The Resurrection (Easter)

But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
 

mustaphadrink

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2013
1,987
371
83
#49
Watch the video I shared. There are people that calculated all of these things without guess work.
No guesswork involved about shepherds washing their socks by night. That is a geographical and historical fact.
 

Truth7t7

Well-known member
May 19, 2020
7,685
2,492
113
#50
:LOL: You can highlight it yellow for all I care but God said that his followers should celebrate all of His feast days.
Your claim is false

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not The Birth (Christmas)

Not The Resurrection (Easter)

But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
 
Jan 25, 2015
9,213
3,189
113
#51
Your claim is false

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not The Birth (Christmas)

Not The Resurrection (Easter)

But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
We can agree to disagree :)
 

Deuteronomy

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2018
3,246
3,579
113
67
#53
Thanks for the response :)

The only biblical instruction that is given to believers, on remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ. Not The Birth (Christmas) Not The Resurrection (Easter) But The (Death)

1 Corinthians 11:24-26KJV
24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.
25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, this cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.
26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
Hello again Truth7t7, there is a lot to consider in this passage, and the parallel passages in the Gospels (particularly Luke's). For now though, here is something to consider (and perhaps discuss :unsure:) from Dr. Fee on the "remembrance".

Unique to the Paul/Luke version of the bread saying is the command to repeat the action: “Do thisin remembrance of me.” Because these words are missing in Mark/Matthew, there has been some question as to their authenticity.111 But in this case that is to place a considerable burden on the silence of Mark. What speaks most strongly in its favor is precisely the fact that the early church so soon after Jesus’ resurrection and the advent of the Spirit did just this—remember his death in this way, as “for us.” The words may have been omitted in the tradition available to Mark for the very reason that such a command is implicit in the continuation of the supper itself.
The phrasein remembrance of meis difficult and has elicited a considerable body of literature. On the basis of Hellenistic parallels, some have argued that the “remembrance” reflects ancient commemorative meals for the dead.113 The obvious difficulties with this are (a) that this meal, even in its Gentile setting, must be understood in light of Jewish meals, especially the Passover, not pagan meals, and (b) that the meal in honor of Jesus is not for a “dead hero” but for the risen Lord, through whose death salvation has been wrought for his people. But the greater issue, especially in light of Jewish usage, is the nature of the “remembrance” itself. Does it have a primarily “Godward” reference, in the sense that God is herewith being petitioned to “remember” Jesus’ atoning death and thus show mercy to his people, or does it have a primarily “humanward” point of reference, in which his people are to “remember” him and thus reflect again on the mercies of his atoning death? Or is it, as some have advanced, inherently ambiguous,115 so that it can mean either or both?
Although one commonly reads that our remembrance of Christ is the plain sense of the words, the issue is not that easy, having to do with (a) a complex range of usage in the OT and other Jewish literature, (b) Jesus’ own intent in light of this usage, and (c) Paul’s understanding.116 The Greek word anamnēsis occurs only five times in the LXX,117 although its cognate mnēmosynon occurs numerous times, as does the cognate verb “to remember.” Firm examples of both “Godward” and “humanward” references abound; however, very few uses are unmistakably “Godward.”
In the OT “remembrance” rarely carries the common English nuance of simply a mental activity. Very often “memory” and “activity” go together. God “remembers” and “visits” or “forgives” or “blots out.” So also Israel is to “remember” by erecting a “memorial” or by reenacting a rite (cf. Exod. 13:9). Of the various possibilities from the OT the most obvious as to what Jesus intended lies within the Passover and Feast of Unleavened Bread, where the rite of the bread is specifically enjoined as a perpetual “remembrance” before their eyes.119 Thus just as the Passover meal itself was such a “remembrance” to be kept forever in Israel, so Jesus is now reconstituting the “memorial” for the newly constituted Israel that will gather around the table in his name to “remember” their own deliverance through him. That is why Jesus described it as “my remembrance.” It is not simply “in memory of him,” but it is eaten as a “memorial” of the salvation that he has effected through his death and resurrection.
In the same way, it is very difficult to escape the conclusion, based on Paul’s own interpretation to come (v. 26), that for him the “remembrance” was primarily “humanward.” After all, that is quite the point in the larger context, where the Corinthians’ meal had turned into such a fiasco that the “remembrance” of Christ is precisely what is missing. Thus Paul’s great concern in repeating these words is to remind them of the “humanward” implications of this “remembrance.” By this meal they “proclaim” Christ’s death until he comes, that is, they declare the good news of their salvation that makes them all one. To participate in a manner unworthy of that specific “remembrance” means to come under judgment for the very reason that it fails to acknowledge the meal as a “memorial” of God’s saving event. ~Fee, G. D. (2014). The First Epistle to the Corinthians. (N. B. Stonehouse, F. F. Bruce, G. D. Fee, & J. B. Green, Eds.) (Revised Edition, pp. 611–613).

~Deut
p.s. - do you believe it a sin to remember the Lord in any other way (than His Supper), or to remember/reflect on ~ALL~ that He did and continues to do for us (not just His death), because we do not have the same kind of clear instruction to do so? Does the text indicate the meaning to be this instead, "Do this, AND THIS ONLY ... in remembrance of Me" :unsure:

.
 

Truth7t7

Well-known member
May 19, 2020
7,685
2,492
113
#54
Hello again Truth7t7, there is a lot to consider in this passage, and the parallel passages in the Gospels (particularly Luke's). For now though, here is something to consider (and perhaps discuss :unsure:) from Dr. Fee on the "remembrance".

Unique to the Paul/Luke version of the bread saying is the command to repeat the action: “Do thisin remembrance of me.” Because these words are missing in Mark/Matthew, there has been some question as to their authenticity.111 But in this case that is to place a considerable burden on the silence of Mark. What speaks most strongly in its favor is precisely the fact that the early church so soon after Jesus’ resurrection and the advent of the Spirit did just this—remember his death in this way, as “for us.” The words may have been omitted in the tradition available to Mark for the very reason that such a command is implicit in the continuation of the supper itself.
The phrasein remembrance of meis difficult and has elicited a considerable body of literature. On the basis of Hellenistic parallels, some have argued that the “remembrance” reflects ancient commemorative meals for the dead.113 The obvious difficulties with this are (a) that this meal, even in its Gentile setting, must be understood in light of Jewish meals, especially the Passover, not pagan meals, and (b) that the meal in honor of Jesus is not for a “dead hero” but for the risen Lord, through whose death salvation has been wrought for his people. But the greater issue, especially in light of Jewish usage, is the nature of the “remembrance” itself. Does it have a primarily “Godward” reference, in the sense that God is herewith being petitioned to “remember” Jesus’ atoning death and thus show mercy to his people, or does it have a primarily “humanward” point of reference, in which his people are to “remember” him and thus reflect again on the mercies of his atoning death? Or is it, as some have advanced, inherently ambiguous,115 so that it can mean either or both?
Although one commonly reads that our remembrance of Christ is the plain sense of the words, the issue is not that easy, having to do with (a) a complex range of usage in the OT and other Jewish literature, (b) Jesus’ own intent in light of this usage, and (c) Paul’s understanding.116 The Greek word anamnēsis occurs only five times in the LXX,117 although its cognate mnēmosynon occurs numerous times, as does the cognate verb “to remember.” Firm examples of both “Godward” and “humanward” references abound; however, very few uses are unmistakably “Godward.”
In the OT “remembrance” rarely carries the common English nuance of simply a mental activity. Very often “memory” and “activity” go together. God “remembers” and “visits” or “forgives” or “blots out.” So also Israel is to “remember” by erecting a “memorial” or by reenacting a rite (cf. Exod. 13:9). Of the various possibilities from the OT the most obvious as to what Jesus intended lies within the Passover and Feast of Unleavened Bread, where the rite of the bread is specifically enjoined as a perpetual “remembrance” before their eyes.119 Thus just as the Passover meal itself was such a “remembrance” to be kept forever in Israel, so Jesus is now reconstituting the “memorial” for the newly constituted Israel that will gather around the table in his name to “remember” their own deliverance through him. That is why Jesus described it as “my remembrance.” It is not simply “in memory of him,” but it is eaten as a “memorial” of the salvation that he has effected through his death and resurrection.
In the same way, it is very difficult to escape the conclusion, based on Paul’s own interpretation to come (v. 26), that for him the “remembrance” was primarily “humanward.” After all, that is quite the point in the larger context, where the Corinthians’ meal had turned into such a fiasco that the “remembrance” of Christ is precisely what is missing. Thus Paul’s great concern in repeating these words is to remind them of the “humanward” implications of this “remembrance.” By this meal they “proclaim” Christ’s death until he comes, that is, they declare the good news of their salvation that makes them all one. To participate in a manner unworthy of that specific “remembrance” means to come under judgment for the very reason that it fails to acknowledge the meal as a “memorial” of God’s saving event. ~Fee, G. D. (2014). The First Epistle to the Corinthians. (N. B. Stonehouse, F. F. Bruce, G. D. Fee, & J. B. Green, Eds.) (Revised Edition, pp. 611–613).

~Deut
p.s. - do you believe it a sin to remember the Lord in any other way (than His Supper), or to remember/reflect on ~ALL~ that He did and continues to do for us (not just His death), because we do not have the same kind of clear instruction to do so? Does the text indicate the meaning to be this instead, "Do this, AND THIS ONLY ... in remembrance of Me" :unsure:

.
Easter is the pagan fertility rites and celebrations of spring.

I always wondered as a kid, why easter bunnies and eggs were going on at the same time, with the Jesus thing in churches, I now know.

The fertility symbols in eggs and bunnies win the day of Easterly.

Easter Day: Mar 21 Vernal Equinox, The Sunday that follows the full moon after this Equinox is Easter, that's why this Sunday is always changing from year to year.

Still looking for this practice in Scripture, possibly Dr. Fee knows where it is? :giggle:
 

Reborn

Senior Member
Nov 16, 2014
4,087
216
63
#55
On and around Halloween, I just stay home and watch horror movies. Nothing wrong with that, right?
I guess it all depends on how someone feels about horror movies? No one can make that call for you. There’s campy horror and then there are ...true horror movies.

IMO, These paranormal, possessed, psychotic demonic over the top visuals type horror movies are on a mind messing level like never before in the history of movies. They mastered it. No more Jason or Freddy. Now it’s like getting a glimpse into a spiritual world man should probably steer clear from. Those type of visuals that stay with you for weeks can’t be healthy for the brain?

Todays CGI brings to life things men only had nightmares of back in the day. (I can just watch a teeny glimpse of a commercial for a horror movie and be freaked out) Personally they make me uncomfortable and twitchy...but l do know people who find it funny or say it’s “just actors and makeup—cheesy make believe”

hmm, well, if “cheesy“ is a visual of a woman contorted backwards walking upside down, up the side of a wall in clickish animal steps...then I’ll pass on a slice. One again, it’s a personal choice and opinion.

...or maybe I’m just a scared big baby?
Maybe I need to get rid of my night light and get a grip on my life, for Pete’s sake, man!? 😢


I’ll just watch the MSM news if l wanna be freaked out in a uncomfortable way. 🤔
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
23,460
7,178
113
#56
passover, not easter.

all saints day comes right after halloween, people forget that

If we are to celebrate just one day I would pick Pentecost.

Actually it would be cool to have a whole year off, like a jubilee. Every seven years the land was meant to have her sabbaths and the 49th year what happened was the everything was free, all debts wiped, and everything forgiven. No work was meant to be done. It was a time of celebration.

Lets go for that, cos christmas is a bit exhausting for most people.
anyway with virus going round, people in masks shouldnt be asking for lollies anyway.
 

mustaphadrink

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2013
1,987
371
83
#57
I guess it all depends on how someone feels about horror movies? No one can make that call for you. There’s campy horror and then there are ...true horror movies.

IMO, These paranormal, possessed, psychotic demonic over the top visuals type horror movies are on a mind messing level like never before in the history of movies. They mastered it. No more Jason or Freddy. Now it’s like getting a glimpse into a spiritual world man should probably steer clear from. Those type of visuals that stay with you for weeks can’t be healthy for the brain?

Todays CGI brings to life things men only had nightmares of back in the day. (I can just watch a teeny glimpse of a commercial for a horror movie and be freaked out) Personally they make me uncomfortable and twitchy...but l do know people who find it funny or say it’s “just actors and makeup—cheesy make believe”

hmm, well, if “cheesy“ is a visual of a woman contorted backwards walking upside down, up the side of a wall in clickish animal steps...then I’ll pass on a slice. One again, it’s a personal choice and opinion.

...or maybe I’m just a scared big baby?
Maybe I need to get rid of my night light and get a grip on my life, for Pete’s sake, man!? 😢


I’ll just watch the MSM news if l wanna be freaked out in a uncomfortable way. 🤔
I think this discussion is just another example of how low the Christian church has descended that they cannot tell the good from the bad and more important how little regard they have for the Word of God.

Philippians 4 v 8 says (MKJV) Finally, my brothers, whatever things are true, whatever things are honest, whatever things are right, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report; if there is any virtue and if there is any praise, think on these things.

So who is going to tell me that Halloween is a good example of this?
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
23,460
7,178
113
#58
hordes of scary monster children descended on the bookshop today at 11am. we were told by mall management to give them lollies. They provided the lollies.

I told the children they were too scary and they had to leave the bookshop. If they were not scary they had to tell me a knock knock joke rather than look at me blankly expecting something. I told heaps of them to get lost, get out and stop scaring people, looking like they just woke up from the dead. None of them bought any books of course.

grr
well it will all be over and by tonight and i think the plan is it will rain and the children will get so sick and hyper from all the lollies that their parents will regret sending them out begging.
 

mustaphadrink

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2013
1,987
371
83
#59
passover, not easter.

all saints day comes right after halloween, people forget that

If we are to celebrate just one day I would pick Pentecost.

Actually it would be cool to have a whole year off, like a jubilee. Every seven years the land was meant to have her sabbaths and the 49th year what happened was the everything was free, all debts wiped, and everything forgiven. No work was meant to be done. It was a time of celebration.

Lets go for that, cos christmas is a bit exhausting for most people.
anyway with virus going round, people in masks shouldnt be asking for lollies anyway.
My daughter and I who I have a great relationship with, are given to jokes when we text each other. She reminds me not to overdo things and make sure I rest at the weekend. Then she says something like "Belay that order. Now that you are retired every day is a weekend."

Or she will tell me to make sure I get plenty of rest and follows it up with "Of course now that you are retired, you sleep in every day."
 

Reborn

Senior Member
Nov 16, 2014
4,087
216
63
#60
I think this discussion is just another example of how low the Christian church has descended that they cannot tell the good from the bad and more important how little regard they have for the Word of God.

Philippians 4 v 8 says (MKJV) Finally, my brothers, whatever things are true, whatever things are honest, whatever things are right, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report; if there is any virtue and if there is any praise, think on these things.

So who is going to tell me that Halloween is a good example of this?

All that from one post? (or was it just the OP / thread itself?) This “discussion“ taking place?
Either way...don’t be silly. Lol.

You don’t even know me. (or anyone in this thread)

Thank God we don’t do the judging in the end. Are we...Hypocritical? Arrogant?
....we are all guilty of it sometimes.
(Making a dramatic statement about the apostasy / Christianity as a whole is a bit over the top?) One post? One thread? Although l do know quite a bit about you now just from reading a single post of yours—so maybe it is possible?

I’ve found that replying with insulting, smug, sarcastic and or rude posts isn’t really productive or helping make it any better? No? Agreed? It just gives the haters more ammo when they claim “we fight amongst ourselves”

No one is ten yrs old here. I try and dish out the same level of respect I wish others to show back to me.
As for your opinion on what I’m assuming is about horror movies?

God searches the hearts and the minds...not our Netflix queues.

It’s simple—we make it complicated.
Hope that helps.