Is it biblical to ask Jesus into your heart?

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Jul 6, 2020
905
330
63
#1
Question: "Is it biblical to ask Jesus into your heart?"

Answer:
“Do you want to be saved? Then just ask Jesus to come into your heart.” While this statement is not anti-biblical, neither is it expressly biblical. The wording generates a mental image that can easily lead to wrong impressions, especially among children, who tend to take things literally. Plus, the exhortation to “ask Jesus into your heart”—if that’s the whole message—leaves out some important things such as repentance and faith. The Bible does mention the fact that, in some sense, Jesus resides in our hearts: Paul prayed “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” (Ephesians 3:17). But Paul is writing to believers who had already received Christ. The parallel prayer in verse 16 is that God “may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being.” There is no evangelistic appeal in the context of Ephesians 3. Paul is not telling the Ephesians to “ask Jesus into their hearts”; he is simply elevating their awareness that Jesus is present within them through the Holy Spirit.

The verse from which the “ask Jesus into your heart” concept is usually taken is Revelation 3:20, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all. Neither does the individual ask Jesus to do anything; rather, Jesus asks us to do something. In context, Jesus is speaking to the church of Laodicea, who was in desperate need of repentance (verse 19). The Laodiceans had effectively excluded Jesus from their fellowship, and the Lord was seeking to restore that fellowship. The passage does not deal with a person calling on the Lord for salvation.

The idea of Jesus “coming into your heart” is nowhere used in any preaching in the Bible. The gospel is the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sin (1 Corinthians 15:3–4). Gospel presentations in the Bible exhort a proper response to that message: believe (John 3:16; Acts 16:31), receive (John 1:12), and repent (Acts 3:19). We are to change our minds about our sin and about who Christ is, believe Jesus died and rose again, and receive the gift of eternal life by faith. None of the apostles ever told someone to “ask Jesus into your heart.”

Often, the exhortation to “ask Jesus to come into your heart” is used as a simple way to say, “Ask Jesus to enter your life” or “Allow the Lord to take control.” If this is done in the context of presenting the whole gospel, then there’s no harm done. But before a person is invited to “ask Jesus into your heart,” he or she should understand sin and its penalty, the payment Christ made on the cross, and the reality of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, referring to salvation as Jesus’ “coming into your heart” might even help a person understand that the Spirit of Christ comes to indwell the soul (see John 14:17). Still, it is always best to use the terminology the Bible uses. “Ask Jesus into your heart” does not fully communicate what is actually occurring at salvation.

When sharing the gospel, we should be careful what we say and how we say it. Even the word believe can be misleading if it is presented as mere intellectual assent (agreeing that certain facts are true) instead of as trust (relying on those true facts). Judas Iscariot believed certain facts about Jesus, but he never trusted Jesus for salvation. Salvation is not about believing a list of facts. Salvation is not about asking Jesus to come into your heart. Salvation is about trusting in Jesus as your Savior, receiving the forgiveness He offers by grace through faith. Salvation is about being made new through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5).

From https://www.gotquestions.org/ask-Jesus-into-heart.html

Thoughts?
 

throughfaith

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2020
10,468
1,591
113
#2
Question: "Is it biblical to ask Jesus into your heart?"

Answer: “Do you want to be saved? Then just ask Jesus to come into your heart.” While this statement is not anti-biblical, neither is it expressly biblical. The wording generates a mental image that can easily lead to wrong impressions, especially among children, who tend to take things literally. Plus, the exhortation to “ask Jesus into your heart”—if that’s the whole message—leaves out some important things such as repentance and faith. The Bible does mention the fact that, in some sense, Jesus resides in our hearts: Paul prayed “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” (Ephesians 3:17). But Paul is writing to believers who had already received Christ. The parallel prayer in verse 16 is that God “may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being.” There is no evangelistic appeal in the context of Ephesians 3. Paul is not telling the Ephesians to “ask Jesus into their hearts”; he is simply elevating their awareness that Jesus is present within them through the Holy Spirit.

The verse from which the “ask Jesus into your heart” concept is usually taken is Revelation 3:20, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all. Neither does the individual ask Jesus to do anything; rather, Jesus asks us to do something. In context, Jesus is speaking to the church of Laodicea, who was in desperate need of repentance (verse 19). The Laodiceans had effectively excluded Jesus from their fellowship, and the Lord was seeking to restore that fellowship. The passage does not deal with a person calling on the Lord for salvation.

The idea of Jesus “coming into your heart” is nowhere used in any preaching in the Bible. The gospel is the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sin (1 Corinthians 15:3–4). Gospel presentations in the Bible exhort a proper response to that message: believe (John 3:16; Acts 16:31), receive (John 1:12), and repent (Acts 3:19). We are to change our minds about our sin and about who Christ is, believe Jesus died and rose again, and receive the gift of eternal life by faith. None of the apostles ever told someone to “ask Jesus into your heart.”

Often, the exhortation to “ask Jesus to come into your heart” is used as a simple way to say, “Ask Jesus to enter your life” or “Allow the Lord to take control.” If this is done in the context of presenting the whole gospel, then there’s no harm done. But before a person is invited to “ask Jesus into your heart,” he or she should understand sin and its penalty, the payment Christ made on the cross, and the reality of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, referring to salvation as Jesus’ “coming into your heart” might even help a person understand that the Spirit of Christ comes to indwell the soul (see John 14:17). Still, it is always best to use the terminology the Bible uses. “Ask Jesus into your heart” does not fully communicate what is actually occurring at salvation.

When sharing the gospel, we should be careful what we say and how we say it. Even the word believe can be misleading if it is presented as mere intellectual assent (agreeing that certain facts are true) instead of as trust (relying on those true facts). Judas Iscariot believed certain facts about Jesus, but he never trusted Jesus for salvation. Salvation is not about believing a list of facts. Salvation is not about asking Jesus to come into your heart. Salvation is about trusting in Jesus as your Savior, receiving the forgiveness He offers by grace through faith. Salvation is about being made new through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5).

From https://www.gotquestions.org/ask-Jesus-into-heart.html

Thoughts?
We recieve Jesus ( John 1 .12 ) by faith . By believing the Gospel . 1 cor 15 .1-4 . Its that simple . 1 cor 1.21 .
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
17,385
4,814
113
#3
Question: "Is it biblical to ask Jesus into your heart?"

Answer: “Do you want to be saved? Then just ask Jesus to come into your heart.” While this statement is not anti-biblical, neither is it expressly biblical. The wording generates a mental image that can easily lead to wrong impressions, especially among children, who tend to take things literally. Plus, the exhortation to “ask Jesus into your heart”—if that’s the whole message—leaves out some important things such as repentance and faith. The Bible does mention the fact that, in some sense, Jesus resides in our hearts: Paul prayed “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” (Ephesians 3:17). But Paul is writing to believers who had already received Christ. The parallel prayer in verse 16 is that God “may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being.” There is no evangelistic appeal in the context of Ephesians 3. Paul is not telling the Ephesians to “ask Jesus into their hearts”; he is simply elevating their awareness that Jesus is present within them through the Holy Spirit.

The verse from which the “ask Jesus into your heart” concept is usually taken is Revelation 3:20, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all. Neither does the individual ask Jesus to do anything; rather, Jesus asks us to do something. In context, Jesus is speaking to the church of Laodicea, who was in desperate need of repentance (verse 19). The Laodiceans had effectively excluded Jesus from their fellowship, and the Lord was seeking to restore that fellowship. The passage does not deal with a person calling on the Lord for salvation.

The idea of Jesus “coming into your heart” is nowhere used in any preaching in the Bible. The gospel is the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sin (1 Corinthians 15:3–4). Gospel presentations in the Bible exhort a proper response to that message: believe (John 3:16; Acts 16:31), receive (John 1:12), and repent (Acts 3:19). We are to change our minds about our sin and about who Christ is, believe Jesus died and rose again, and receive the gift of eternal life by faith. None of the apostles ever told someone to “ask Jesus into your heart.”

Often, the exhortation to “ask Jesus to come into your heart” is used as a simple way to say, “Ask Jesus to enter your life” or “Allow the Lord to take control.” If this is done in the context of presenting the whole gospel, then there’s no harm done. But before a person is invited to “ask Jesus into your heart,” he or she should understand sin and its penalty, the payment Christ made on the cross, and the reality of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, referring to salvation as Jesus’ “coming into your heart” might even help a person understand that the Spirit of Christ comes to indwell the soul (see John 14:17). Still, it is always best to use the terminology the Bible uses. “Ask Jesus into your heart” does not fully communicate what is actually occurring at salvation.

When sharing the gospel, we should be careful what we say and how we say it. Even the word believe can be misleading if it is presented as mere intellectual assent (agreeing that certain facts are true) instead of as trust (relying on those true facts). Judas Iscariot believed certain facts about Jesus, but he never trusted Jesus for salvation. Salvation is not about believing a list of facts. Salvation is not about asking Jesus to come into your heart. Salvation is about trusting in Jesus as your Savior, receiving the forgiveness He offers by grace through faith. Salvation is about being made new through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5).

From https://www.gotquestions.org/ask-Jesus-into-heart.html

Thoughts?

I think we in the church, who grew up in church, have a lot of cliches we don't realize we have. My husband didn't grow up in church and he's often asking "what do you mean by..." Makes me more aware of what I'm saying I think.
 

stepbystep

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2020
613
488
63
#4
Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me. Revelation 3:20

Would this door Jesus knocks on be our hearts? If we invite him in by opening the door, would that make the statement Biblical?
 

stepbystep

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2020
613
488
63
#5
Salvation is about believing in Jesus and giving our hearts to him. The Holy Spirit resides in our hearts, and it is our hearts that is changed and cleansed of sin as I understand it. While the exact words may not appear in Scripture, I do not see how it can be such a terrible thing to state given what is taught in John 3:16 and Acts 4:12.

The Article you quoted has some good information in it.
 

Iconoclast

Senior Member
May 27, 2017
466
143
43
#6
Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me. Revelation 3:e20

Would this door Jesus knocks on be our hearts? If we invite him in by opening the door, would that make the statement Biblical?
No...God promises to give us a new heart,not to come in to our old one.
 

Iconoclast

Senior Member
May 27, 2017
466
143
43
#7
Salvation is about believing in Jesus and giving our hearts to him. The Holy Spirit resides in our hearts, and it is our hearts that is changed and cleansed of sin as I understand it. While the exact words may not appear in Scripture, I do not see how it can be such a terrible thing to state given what is taught in John 3:16 and Acts 4:12.

The Article you quoted has some good information in it.
He does not want our old heart
He wants to do a heart transplant Jer.31,Heb
8
 

stepbystep

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2020
613
488
63
#8
Isn't this new heart referring to our heart being cleansed by the blood of Jesus? 1 John 1:7-9, Revelation 1:5, Revelation 7:14, Hebrews 9:14, Psalm 51:2, 10, Hebrews 1:3. These seem to suggest that giving us a new heart speaks of the blood of Jesus cleansing our hearts of the sin that stains them.
 

stepbystep

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2020
613
488
63
#9
I wonder how this would compare to our being "born again?"

An interesting consideration.
 
Jul 6, 2020
905
330
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#10
I wonder how this would compare to our being "born again?"

An interesting consideration.
How about this line of thinking

The word of the Gospel is the seed of life in God
Once we receive it we become pregnant with hope.
It unites with us and connects us to God through Faith in Christ
So we are called to abide in vine , the umbilical of faith,
Rooted and grounded in love, the blood of Christ
Until Christ is fully formed in us.
Whatever the Gestation period is spiritually till your ready.
Then you are born into the light, usually through much pain and difficultly.
The word says not to be surprised at that, its a result of the sin.
Then you receive your first spiritual breath, the holy kind.
Then it is the milk of the word that sustains you
Lots of poopy diapers
Learning to chew your own food.
Toddler first steps of faith
Growing in strength and the stature of Christ Jesus.
The ceasing of childish sinful ways
Being placed into service in the house
Begin to Give God glory with the rest of our life
Getting filled up to all the fullness of God for that very purpose
Completing your course having neglected nothing of the salvation provided to you
for you eternal life of God and your Godliness
 

throughfaith

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2020
10,468
1,591
113
#11
How about this line of thinking

The word of the Gospel is the seed of life in God
Once we receive it we become pregnant with hope.
It unites with us and connects us to God through Faith in Christ
So we are called to abide in vine , the umbilical of faith,
Rooted and grounded in love, the blood of Christ
Until Christ is fully formed in us.
Whatever the Gestation period is spiritually till your ready.
Then you are born into the light, usually through much pain and difficultly.
The word says not to be surprised at that, its a result of the sin.
Then you receive your first spiritual breath, the holy kind.
Then it is the milk of the word that sustains you
Lots of poopy diapers
Learning to chew your own food.
Toddler first steps of faith
Growing in strength and the stature of Christ Jesus.
The ceasing of childish sinful ways
Being placed into service in the house
Begin to Give God glory with the rest of our life
Getting filled up to all the fullness of God for that very purpose
Completing your course having neglected nothing of the salvation provided to you
for you eternal life of God and your Godliness
Whilst that may preach well in some churches on Sunday morning. We would be better off using the bible to explain the component s of salvation.
 
Jul 6, 2020
905
330
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#12
Whilst that may preach well in some churches on Sunday morning. We would be better off using the bible to explain the component s of salvation.
Well if you know your bible you could put chapter and verses next to most every line.
Some people remain ignorant that the bible is to be understood in the context of creation.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
16,120
7,938
113
#13
Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all.
Do you seriously think that that door mentioned by Christ is an ordinary door, since Christ could walk into buildings without the need for opening doors?

Now you are simply digging yourself deeper and deeper into a hole of your own creation, by trying to oppose Christ Himself. Christ and the Holy Spirit must ENTER into every saint in order for them to be sanctified. And Christ must be RECEIVED into the heart as Lord and Savior in order for sinners to be saved.

He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. (John 1:11-13)
 
Jul 6, 2020
905
330
63
#14
I believe teaching receiving Christ this was is damaging.

Why put aside what the bible clearly says in favor of some recent error.
Why risk giving a different Gospel message regarding how to be saved?

Should we not stick to the straight up words of Jesus?

Jesus replied, "Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. - John 14:23

The Apostle Paul explains that like this quoting from Deuteronomy
But what does it say? “THE WORD IS NEAR YOU, IN YOUR MOUTH AND IN YOUR HEART”—that is, the word of faith which we are preaching, that if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved; for with the heart a person believes, resulting in righteousness, and with the mouth he confesses (Jesus lordship over us), resulting in salvation. -Romans 10:8-10
At least we know where the saying embrace Jesus as your personal Lord and saviour comes from.


It is not in heaven, that you should need to ask, ‘Who will ascend into heaven to get it for us and proclaim it, that we may obey it? it is not beyond the sea, that you should need to ask, ‘Who will cross the sea to get it for us and proclaim it, that we may obey it?’ But the word (Christ) is very near you; it is in your mouth and in your heart, so that you may obey it. See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, as well as death and disaster. For I am commanding you today to love the LORD your God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments, statutes, and ordinances, so that you may live and increase, and the LORD your God may bless you in the land that you are entering to possess - Deuteronomy 30:14-16
 
Jul 6, 2020
905
330
63
#15
Do you seriously think that that door mentioned by Christ is an ordinary door, since Christ could walk into buildings without the need for opening doors?

Now you are simply digging yourself deeper and deeper into a hole of your own creation, by trying to oppose Christ Himself. Christ and the Holy Spirit must ENTER into every saint in order for them to be sanctified. And Christ must be RECEIVED into the heart as Lord and Savior in order for sinners to be saved.

He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. (John 1:11-13)
The context of the opening the door is in regard to the disobedient Church and the result of the doors being opened is dinner with Jesus a picture of both fellowship and becoming like him in partaking of him.

But the author of the OP did a great job in my opinion of laying out how teaching a Gospel of inviting Jesus into your heart can be misleading if not totally false depending on how you present it and in general a recent practice in departure from the clear biblical texts available for that purpose. It original usage being in an over simplification of the gospel for children's books, they just went too far and it might have been assumed they would be properly educated as an adult but that child's version ended up become the adult version coloring everyone's understanding and separating them from the necessary obedience out of love to the Lordship of Jesus in order to be saved.
Add to that the foolish ones who cant tell the difference between obedience under the law and obedience out of love and faith and go around shouting "WORKS WORKS" resulting in people being driven even further away from salvation through your confession of Jesus as lord and all that is required for that to be true and not false.
 

throughfaith

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2020
10,468
1,591
113
#16
I believe teaching receiving Christ this was is damaging.

Why put aside what the bible clearly says in favor of some recent error.
Why risk giving a different Gospel message regarding how to be saved?

Should we not stick to the straight up words of Jesus?

Jesus replied, "Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. - John 14:23

The Apostle Paul explains that like this quoting from Deuteronomy
But what does it say? “THE WORD IS NEAR YOU, IN YOUR MOUTH AND IN YOUR HEART”—that is, the word of faith which we are preaching, that if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved; for with the heart a person believes, resulting in righteousness, and with the mouth he confesses (Jesus lordship over us), resulting in salvation. -Romans 10:8-10
At least we know where the saying embrace Jesus as your personal Lord and saviour comes from.


It is not in heaven, that you should need to ask, ‘Who will ascend into heaven to get it for us and proclaim it, that we may obey it? it is not beyond the sea, that you should need to ask, ‘Who will cross the sea to get it for us and proclaim it, that we may obey it?’ But the word (Christ) is very near you; it is in your mouth and in your heart, so that you may obey it. See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, as well as death and disaster. For I am commanding you today to love the LORD your God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments, statutes, and ordinances, so that you may live and increase, and the LORD your God may bless you in the land that you are entering to possess - Deuteronomy 30:14-16
Rom 6
But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye HAVE OBEYED from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you.( THE GOSPEL)
 
Jul 6, 2020
905
330
63
#17
Rom 6
But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye HAVE OBEYED from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you.( THE GOSPEL)
Yeah love me some Romans 6

Do you not know that when you offer yourselves as obedient slaves, you are slaves to the one you obey, whether you are slaves to sin leading to death, or to obedience leading to righteousness? 17But thanks be to God that, though you once were slaves to sin, you wholeheartedly obeyed the form of teaching to which you were committed. 18You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness.
19I am speaking in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh. Just as you used to offer the parts of your body in slavery to impurity and to escalating wickedness, so now offer them in slavery to righteousness leading to holiness.

That wholehearted obedience, that offering of yourself as a slave to righteousness, That is the confession of Jesus as Lord, that results in salvation because of its leading to holiness (What the law could not do) the living of the life of God in Christ Jesus.
 

Pilgrimshope

Well-known member
Sep 2, 2020
3,483
1,132
113
#18
Question: "Is it biblical to ask Jesus into your heart?"

Answer: “Do you want to be saved? Then just ask Jesus to come into your heart.” While this statement is not anti-biblical, neither is it expressly biblical. The wording generates a mental image that can easily lead to wrong impressions, especially among children, who tend to take things literally. Plus, the exhortation to “ask Jesus into your heart”—if that’s the whole message—leaves out some important things such as repentance and faith. The Bible does mention the fact that, in some sense, Jesus resides in our hearts: Paul prayed “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” (Ephesians 3:17). But Paul is writing to believers who had already received Christ. The parallel prayer in verse 16 is that God “may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being.” There is no evangelistic appeal in the context of Ephesians 3. Paul is not telling the Ephesians to “ask Jesus into their hearts”; he is simply elevating their awareness that Jesus is present within them through the Holy Spirit.

The verse from which the “ask Jesus into your heart” concept is usually taken is Revelation 3:20, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all. Neither does the individual ask Jesus to do anything; rather, Jesus asks us to do something. In context, Jesus is speaking to the church of Laodicea, who was in desperate need of repentance (verse 19). The Laodiceans had effectively excluded Jesus from their fellowship, and the Lord was seeking to restore that fellowship. The passage does not deal with a person calling on the Lord for salvation.

The idea of Jesus “coming into your heart” is nowhere used in any preaching in the Bible. The gospel is the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sin (1 Corinthians 15:3–4). Gospel presentations in the Bible exhort a proper response to that message: believe (John 3:16; Acts 16:31), receive (John 1:12), and repent (Acts 3:19). We are to change our minds about our sin and about who Christ is, believe Jesus died and rose again, and receive the gift of eternal life by faith. None of the apostles ever told someone to “ask Jesus into your heart.”

Often, the exhortation to “ask Jesus to come into your heart” is used as a simple way to say, “Ask Jesus to enter your life” or “Allow the Lord to take control.” If this is done in the context of presenting the whole gospel, then there’s no harm done. But before a person is invited to “ask Jesus into your heart,” he or she should understand sin and its penalty, the payment Christ made on the cross, and the reality of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, referring to salvation as Jesus’ “coming into your heart” might even help a person understand that the Spirit of Christ comes to indwell the soul (see John 14:17). Still, it is always best to use the terminology the Bible uses. “Ask Jesus into your heart” does not fully communicate what is actually occurring at salvation.

When sharing the gospel, we should be careful what we say and how we say it. Even the word believe can be misleading if it is presented as mere intellectual assent (agreeing that certain facts are true) instead of as trust (relying on those true facts). Judas Iscariot believed certain facts about Jesus, but he never trusted Jesus for salvation. Salvation is not about believing a list of facts. Salvation is not about asking Jesus to come into your heart. Salvation is about trusting in Jesus as your Savior, receiving the forgiveness He offers by grace through faith. Salvation is about being made new through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5).

From https://www.gotquestions.org/ask-Jesus-into-heart.html

Thoughts?
Do you think knowing Jesus if someone prayed and asked for him to come into thier life and be present in thier heart and lead them . He would answer that call from a believer ?
 

awelight

Active member
Aug 10, 2020
850
242
43
66
#19
A couple of thoughts to ponder on this Lord's Day.

For those who do not think that salvation is the free Grace of God. God plus nothing.

Ponder these two statements, if you will:


-- When a man teaches that Salvation is a cooperation between God and man......It is like teaching that the clay is in cooperation with the potter, as to how it will be formed.


-- Philosophers say: Free Grace makes man nothing more than a mere puppet on a string.....But the recipients of Grace reply, This is better than making God a puppet on a string, of man's free will.
 

Pilgrimshope

Well-known member
Sep 2, 2020
3,483
1,132
113
#20
A couple of thoughts to ponder on this Lord's Day.

For those who do not think that salvation is the free Grace of God. God plus nothing.

Ponder these two statements, if you will:


-- When a man teaches that Salvation is a cooperation between God and man......It is like teaching that the clay is in cooperation with the potter, as to how it will be formed.


-- Philosophers say: Free Grace makes man nothing more than a mere puppet on a string.....But the recipients of Grace reply, This is better than making God a puppet on a string, of man's free will.
does it matter to you , how jesus said we are saved ? Do you think he knows God better than we do ? Should anyone find out what the lord Jesus the savior said about being saved ?