Metaphorically speaking, who is the woman with the ten silver coins in Luke 15: 8-10?

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Jul 6, 2023
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#1
I already have a possible response but my daughter insists that the proper and polite way to start a conversation is with a question.
 

birdie

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2014
505
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#2
Metaphorically speaking, who is the woman with the ten silver coins in Luke 15: 8-10? I already have a possible response but my daughter insists that the proper and polite way to start a conversation is with a question.
Thanks George71, for your question about these verses:

"Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost. Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth."

First of all this is a lovely scripture about the joy that is amongst believers when a sinner turns to God. I have not looked at this scripture thoroughly and I am not an expert, but I could hazard a guess that the woman is a picture of the Jerusalem that is above, which the true believers are all a part of. The book of Galatians describe her as our mother. Another way to put this same idea is that she is the church of God, the true believers, since we see these also pictured by a woman in Rev 12. The candle and the house both speak of this as well. The house, for example is mentioned in Hebrews: ""But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we". Jesus spoke of the believers as his 'friends': "Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you." So, the general message seems to be about the believers, seeking the lost. Of course, that would have to be through Christ, since Jesus is the one who comes to seek and to save the lost.
 
L

Locoponydirtman

Guest
#3
The woman is à character in a parable story. She is not a real person. And a parable does not have to have a one to one representation to real things. The point is if people celebrates the recovery of lost valued items, How, also God celebrates the recovery of lost valued persons.
 

jb

Senior Member
Feb 27, 2010
4,940
588
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#4
Luke 15v4-7 - The Lord Jesus, the Good Shepherd, John 10v11

Luke 15v8-10 - The Holy Spirit, John 3v7,8

Luke 15v11-32 - God, Our Heavenly Father, Rom 8v15,16
 

posthuman

Senior Member
Jul 31, 2013
36,643
13,120
113
#6
I already have a possible response but my daughter insists that the proper and polite way to start a conversation is with a question.
It is bound with the parable immediately before it, the lost sheep that the Shepard seeks out, finds, and carries home on His shoulder, also rejoicing.

clearly that Shepherd is the Good one, the Son, and the one who was lost is us sinners, about which the chapter opens with complaining that He sat with us, ate with us and communed with us - not being sullied by us as it was supposed.

No one worries about getting their hands dirty pulling a treasure from the dirt, do they?

perhaps this woman is like the Shepherd's Bride, for she sees what He does and takes part in His work with Him. for when the angel tells John, come I will show you the Bride of The Lamb, what does he see but heavenly Jerusalem?
 

Edify

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2021
1,318
509
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#7
Usually there is no specific person, named or otherwise in a parable. It is to keep the focus on the illustrated story itself & its teaching.
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#8
Thanks George71, for your question about these verses:

"Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost. Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth."

First of all this is a lovely scripture about the joy that is amongst believers when a sinner turns to God. I have not looked at this scripture thoroughly and I am not an expert, but I could hazard a guess that the woman is a picture of the Jerusalem that is above, which the true believers are all a part of. The book of Galatians describe her as our mother. Another way to put this same idea is that she is the church of God, the true believers, since we see these also pictured by a woman in Rev 12. The candle and the house both speak of this as well. The house, for example is mentioned in Hebrews: ""But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we". Jesus spoke of the believers as his 'friends': "Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you." So, the general message seems to be about the believers, seeking the lost. Of course, that would have to be through Christ, since Jesus is the one who comes to seek and to save the lost.
Yes I also love the joy expressed at the end, both human and angelic.

I agree that she could be Jerusalem but not the one above. Nothing is "lost" there so nothing/no one needs to be found there. Also the parable itself is spoken in response to the "muttering" Pharisees and teachers of the Law" mentioned in verse 1, who objected to Jesus welcoming/eating with sinners.

What are your thoughts on the ten silver coins?
 

JohnDB

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2021
5,591
2,197
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#9
Possibly. On the other hand it appears that most of the parables of Christ were based on actual events.
Yes,
A headband with ten silver coins was given to an "engaged" woman by the groom.
The Pharisees and other religious elders could snatch a coin if they caught her doing something untoward.
The coins were usually unique and chosen by the groom so he could recognize them later. No replacing....

If he found them missing or replaced he could back out of marrying her. No recriminations and the bride price returned.

The woman was negligent in making sure they were secure to the headband.
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#10
The woman is à character in a parable story. She is not a real person. And a parable does not have to have a one to one representation to real things. The point is if people celebrates the recovery of lost valued items, How, also God celebrates the recovery of lost valued persons.
Thank you for your response.

I agree that the woman is not a real person but a character in a parable story. That is why my question begins, "Metaphorically speaking". And you are correct a parable does not have to have one to one representation to real things. But it can also be said that parables may have very real one to one representations to real things, physical things or spiritual things.

So I guess from your response you think the woman has no meaning (physical or spiritual) in this parable offered in response to the muttering Pharisees of verse 1?
 
L

Locoponydirtman

Guest
#11
Possibly. On the other hand it appears that most of the parables of Christ were based on actual events.
What evidence is there for this assertion?
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#12
Luke 15v4-7 - The Lord Jesus, the Good Shepherd, John 10v11

Luke 15v8-10 - The Holy Spirit, John 3v7,8

Luke 15v11-32 - God, Our Heavenly Father, Rom 8v15,16
Hi jb

I understand the first reference to the Good Shepard (Luke 15v4-7) Although if could be argued that the person discussed in verses 4-6 is not a "good" shepherd. First Jesus identifies him with those listening to Him ("Suppose one of you"). Also he leaves 99 sheep in the open country to fend for themselves.

Are you citing John 3v7,8 to identify the woman with 10 silver coins? And you cite Rom 8v15,16 to identify the father of the two sons (v11,32)?
 
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Locoponydirtman

Guest
#14
Thank you for your response.

I agree that the woman is not a real person but a character in a parable story. That is why my question begins, "Metaphorically speaking". And you are correct a parable does not have to have one to one representation to real things. But it can also be said that parables may have very real one to one representations to real things, physical things or spiritual things.

So I guess from your response you think the woman has no meaning (physical or spiritual) in this parable offered in response to the muttering Pharisees of verse 1?
There is no cause to make any further inference. Jesus explained Himself well enough in the text.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
24,339
12,869
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#15
What evidence is there for this assertion?
Jesus -- as God -- knows all things and all hearts. Do you seriously think He had to "invent" stories? He would have had full access to all those incidents, which do not sound "made up", but actually present real life scenarios.
 
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Locoponydirtman

Guest
#16
Jesus -- as God -- knows all things and all hearts. Do you seriously think He had to "invent" stories? He would have had full access to all those incidents, which do not sound "made up", but actually present real life scenarios.
Thats conjecture, not evidence.
 
L

Locoponydirtman

Guest
#17
Amd it irrelevant to the point of the parable
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#18
It is bound with the parable immediately before it, the lost sheep that the Shepard seeks out, finds, and carries home on His shoulder, also rejoicing.

clearly that Shepherd is the Good one, the Son, and the one who was lost is us sinners, about which the chapter opens with complaining that He sat with us, ate with us and communed with us - not being sullied by us as it was supposed.

No one worries about getting their hands dirty pulling a treasure from the dirt, do they?

perhaps this woman is like the Shepherd's Bride, for she sees what He does and takes part in His work with Him. for when the angel tells John, come I will show you the Bride of The Lamb, what does he see but heavenly Jerusalem?
Yes it is bound to the parable immediately before it (actually there is one parable starts in v3 ends in v32). But I don't think Shepard should be capitalized in your comment as Jesus identifies the "shepherd" with those listening to Him not to Himself (i.e. "Suppose one of you"). So this shepherd is not the "Good One".

I agree no one worries about getting their hands dirty pulling a treasure from the dirt.

As to likening the woman to the Shepard's Bride, I don't think the Bride of of the Lamb/heavenly Jerusalem ever losses any silver coins because everyone in Heaven is found, not lost.
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#19
Yes,
A headband with ten silver coins was given to an "engaged" woman by the groom.
The Pharisees and other religious elders could snatch a coin if they caught her doing something untoward.
The coins were usually unique and chosen by the groom so he could recognize them later. No replacing....

If he found them missing or replaced he could back out of marrying her. No recriminations and the bride price returned.

The woman was negligent in making sure they were secure to the headband.
Love your post! Is this found in Scripture or Jewish tradition/writings?
 
Jul 6, 2023
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#20
Usually there is no specific person, named or otherwise in a parable. It is to keep the focus on the illustrated story itself & its teaching.
I agree parables do not contain specific real life persons (e.g. Oprah). If they did they would not be parables. But they can include "people" who are types/shadows/metaphors of the real meaning. In that fashion they contribute to the story and its teaching (see verses Luke 15:11-32)

No guess in response to my question?