Kyle Rittenhouse Trial

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JohnDB

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ZNP

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He did the world a favor by killing that pedophile who was clearly nuts.
BUT
You can sue a ham sandwich for having mustard and mayonnaise....but good luck getting a judgment.
I would vote to convict, why would you put mayo and mustard?
 

gb9

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Jan 18, 2011
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I would vote to convict, why would you put mayo and mustard?
how about if one puts mustard on one side only and mayo and the other side only??

would give a guilty verdict on that??
 

ZNP

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how about if one puts mustard on one side only and mayo and the other side only??

would give a guilty verdict on that??
Are there extenuating circumstances? A ham sandwich should have swiss cheese and pickels and preferably rye bread. I suppose if they did all that and ran out of mustard for the other side. you could let them off with a slap on the wrist.
 

NightTwister

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Jul 5, 2023
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Are there extenuating circumstances? A ham sandwich should have swiss cheese and pickels and preferably rye bread. I suppose if they did all that and ran out of mustard for the other side. you could let them off with a slap on the wrist.
Mustard is a food group.
 
L

Locoponydirtman

Guest
Are there extenuating circumstances? A ham sandwich should have swiss cheese and pickels and preferably rye bread. I suppose if they did all that and ran out of mustard for the other side. you could let them off with a slap on the wrist.
No ham requires sharp chedder, roast beef goes with swiss. Also ham needs to be on whole wheat not rye. Rye goes with corned beef. Get it right or no sandwich for you.
 

ThereRoseaLamb

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Jan 17, 2023
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No ham requires sharp chedder, roast beef goes with swiss. Also ham needs to be on whole wheat not rye. Rye goes with corned beef. Get it right or no sandwich for you.
Whoa, have you some chef work in your past? Or are you a foodie? :D
 

ZNP

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Whoa, have you some chef work in your past? Or are you a foodie? :D
I don't know, I was always brought up with Ham and Swiss on Rye with a good mustard and pickles.
 

JohnDB

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Whoa, have you some chef work in your past? Or are you a foodie? :D
Well he is partially correct...but only if using more bland (and usually mundane) cures for the ham, beef, and corned beef.... and only mild to medium lower fat cheeses and commercial breads.

Artisan meats and cheeses are not as common as they once were. A good Artisan gouda (not smoked) or something (my memory is escaping me as heat stroke settles in from yard work) is plenty sufficient for a common ham...the milky flavor is great with ham or even a fresh sage breakfast sausage. An Artisan ham can be paired with any number of cheeses depending upon the cure. A good corned beef is great on an Artisan rye...but don't bother with the emmenthaler swiss...it is going to get covered up by the demanded horseradish sauce the beefy and spicy flavor demands. Where the milky sweetness and ammonia would usually be welcomed...an Artisan corned beef on Artisan crusty rye is best all by itself without the cheese unless it is common.
 

JohnDB

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Colby....that's the cheese that when I'd Artisan goes better with common ham than anything....and when enriched with cream? You can't believe that it is Colby.
 

ThereRoseaLamb

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Jan 17, 2023
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Well he is partially correct...but only if using more bland (and usually mundane) cures for the ham, beef, and corned beef.... and only mild to medium lower fat cheeses and commercial breads.

Artisan meats and cheeses are not as common as they once were. A good Artisan gouda (not smoked) or something (my memory is escaping me as heat stroke settles in from yard work) is plenty sufficient for a common ham...the milky flavor is great with ham or even a fresh sage breakfast sausage. An Artisan ham can be paired with any number of cheeses depending upon the cure. A good corned beef is great on an Artisan rye...but don't bother with the emmenthaler swiss...it is going to get covered up by the demanded horseradish sauce the beefy and spicy flavor demands. Where the milky sweetness and ammonia would usually be welcomed...an Artisan corned beef on Artisan crusty rye is best all by itself without the cheese unless it is common.

We have a Kroger near us that is the biggest in the state. It has cheeses I have never heard of! My aunt, who is Danish, visited from Canada and was surprised to see all the choices. She was a chef in her younger years. Horseradish is a bit beyond my tolerance. Not a fan of anything that over powers the food instead of compliments it. But hubby reminded me I'm Canadian and ketchup is almost too overpowering for me. rofl
 

JohnDB

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Jan 16, 2021
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We have a Kroger near us that is the biggest in the state. It has cheeses I have never heard of! My aunt, who is Danish, visited from Canada and was surprised to see all the choices. She was a chef in her younger years. Horseradish is a bit beyond my tolerance. Not a fan of anything that over powers the food instead of compliments it. But hubby reminded me I'm Canadian and ketchup is almost too overpowering for me. rofl
Most of what I'm talking about doesn’t hit the shelves of a kroger....well, maybe if they had one in Beverly Hills.

For example the good Colby is found in Indiana outside a Shipshewana....made by the Amish. (The dairy just wouldn't fit inside the market....ha ha ha)

A jambon that is uniquely spiced (ham) or corned beef is going to be found and made by an Artisan charcuterie. Very pricey stuff these days. (My wife is definitely spoiled)

And horseradish sauce fit for a true corned beef is not going to be so hot you can't take it...it will compliment the meat and not overpower it. I did some during the pandemic when I found some whole briskets on sale. (I do know how to break them down as I am a fully trained chef)

I then set about curing them.

Real Artisan corned beef is not treated with meat tenderizers or food coloring and actually tastes like spiced beef with bay, juniper, mustard seed, and etc. It takes a bit longer to cook to get tender (like a pot roast does) but it definitely has a distinct beef flavor.

Hams are bent to whatever flavor you desire with some form of sweetness or the sugars are so subdued they aren't noticeable and smoked or baked slowly until fully cooked. (But not necessarily tender)

Most modern hams are baked and sprayed with brown food coloring that has smoke flavoring in it...or the smoke flavoring is put into the cure for the ham. The pink color comes from food dye too....

Real hams are cured and smoked whole. The curing is so you don't see the pink smoke ring. The sugar is to stop the nitrites from becoming carcinogenic.

Most of the Artisan cheeses can be found still. Tillamook used to be an Artisan creamery making Artisan cheddar and etc....aging them for years until ready. Now they tend to be mass produced crap. I haven't been to their creamery lately....but I was told you could get the good stuff at the factory itself....but nowhere else.

European cheeses are illegal in the USA. If the FDA busts you it's your neck but with a few friends and if you are willing to pay the shipping costs you can get anything fed-ex in good condition. From fresh milk chocolate brown truffles from France to Emmanthaler baby swiss....even Papillion parmesean from Italy.
Expensive stuff....but it will be decidedly different than what they do to pass FDA inspections with oversalting the Bleu cheeses and etc.

But....meh....I make what I can and ignore the rest unless I have a patron willing to pay.