How to handle patronage

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ArtsieSteph

Senior Member
Apr 1, 2014
6,182
1,268
113
29
Arizona
#1
So I’m an artist, and I love being able to support other artists by buying their wares. Prints, pins, charms, and the like. But there arises a problem when it comes to the person’s personal beliefs and their art. Usually those things go hand in hand, as often times an artist will make things based on those beliefs. But when it’s an artist making say, a fan art of something with sonic. the hedgehog, and I’d love to buy it. Well then I see that it comes with a free pride flag per purchase. Here lies the dilemma: I didn’t purchase anything having to do with gay pride, but once that comes in the scenario doesn’t it become in a way supporting that movement?

When you get art of something you like and the artist HAPPENS to be into something you don’t like, I would imagine it would be like the scenario of eating at someone’s house. You don’t worry if it’s been blessed by an idol, you ask God to bless it and go on. But if the person is specifically using their unrelated art to push a certain massage you don’t agree with...what then? Do you buy the art and refuse the gay pride flag? That may be enough to mitigate the situation. But say it’s a friend whose art you love, but find out they’re in some kind of cult or dabble occasionally in occultism just for the fun of it? What do you do then?

Many people are able to separate an artist from their art, but I often find that difficult. Say I like an artist but then find out they’re on the internet making antisemitic remarks, that fool is gonna be dropped and blocked in a second. But what about something else? Like buying a car or a tool kit? I know that it’s pretty impossible to know everyone’s leanings when making a purchase, but what if it’s SUPER obvious?
 

shittim

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2016
2,766
1,043
113
#2
I see what you mean GG, yes, that is difficult here as well, I have a soft heart and want to help as well. In such a case, after finding this support of that which is unholy and hurtful I would decline saying something like I can't at this time, but hope you do well, of course the "doing well" is the hope of the person coming to faith.
 

CharliRenee

Member
Staff member
Nov 4, 2014
6,003
6,540
113
#3
So I’m an artist, and I love being able to support other artists by buying their wares. Prints, pins, charms, and the like. But there arises a problem when it comes to the person’s personal beliefs and their art. Usually those things go hand in hand, as often times an artist will make things based on those beliefs. But when it’s an artist making say, a fan art of something with sonic. the hedgehog, and I’d love to buy it. Well then I see that it comes with a free pride flag per purchase. Here lies the dilemma: I didn’t purchase anything having to do with gay pride, but once that comes in the scenario doesn’t it become in a way supporting that movement?

When you get art of something you like and the artist HAPPENS to be into something you don’t like, I would imagine it would be like the scenario of eating at someone’s house. You don’t worry if it’s been blessed by an idol, you ask God to bless it and go on. But if the person is specifically using their unrelated art to push a certain massage you don’t agree with...what then? Do you buy the art and refuse the gay pride flag? That may be enough to mitigate the situation. But say it’s a friend whose art you love, but find out they’re in some kind of cult or dabble occasionally in occultism just for the fun of it? What do you do then?

Many people are able to separate an artist from their art, but I often find that difficult. Say I like an artist but then find out they’re on the internet making antisemitic remarks, that fool is gonna be dropped and blocked in a second. But what about something else? Like buying a car or a tool kit? I know that it’s pretty impossible to know everyone’s leanings when making a purchase, but what if it’s SUPER obvious?
Good question. Where do you draw the line? I think you said it, when you look at the message of what a particular piece represents. Even in songs, sometimes I like someone giving glory to God in a particular song, but wonder if I shouldn't because their lifestyle is in conflict with their song.

I don't know, but looks forward to responses. I support NOT supporting ignorance like with the anti-semitism.
 

blue_ladybug

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2014
70,440
9,029
113
#4
I see what you mean GG, yes, that is difficult here as well, I have a soft heart and want to help as well. In such a case, after finding this support of that which is unholy and hurtful I would decline saying something like I can't at this time, but hope you do well, of course the "doing well" is the hope of the person coming to faith.
Psstt.. ArtsieSteph is not GG.. (GodsGirl) :)
 

blue_ladybug

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2014
70,440
9,029
113
#5
So I’m an artist, and I love being able to support other artists by buying their wares. Prints, pins, charms, and the like. But there arises a problem when it comes to the person’s personal beliefs and their art. Usually those things go hand in hand, as often times an artist will make things based on those beliefs. But when it’s an artist making say, a fan art of something with sonic. the hedgehog, and I’d love to buy it. Well then I see that it comes with a free pride flag per purchase. Here lies the dilemma: I didn’t purchase anything having to do with gay pride, but once that comes in the scenario doesn’t it become in a way supporting that movement?

When you get art of something you like and the artist HAPPENS to be into something you don’t like, I would imagine it would be like the scenario of eating at someone’s house. You don’t worry if it’s been blessed by an idol, you ask God to bless it and go on. But if the person is specifically using their unrelated art to push a certain massage you don’t agree with...what then? Do you buy the art and refuse the gay pride flag? That may be enough to mitigate the situation. But say it’s a friend whose art you love, but find out they’re in some kind of cult or dabble occasionally in occultism just for the fun of it? What do you do then?

Many people are able to separate an artist from their art, but I often find that difficult. Say I like an artist but then find out they’re on the internet making antisemitic remarks, that fool is gonna be dropped and blocked in a second. But what about something else? Like buying a car or a tool kit? I know that it’s pretty impossible to know everyone’s leanings when making a purchase, but what if it’s SUPER obvious?
Simple answer: if it comes with a gay pride flag, don't buy it because they obviously support that agenda. Same with any other product..
 

shittim

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2016
2,766
1,043
113
#6
yes, I just viewed a GG post and got turned around, artsie steph is another I appreciate following.
 

ArtsieSteph

Senior Member
Apr 1, 2014
6,182
1,268
113
29
Arizona
#7
I feel like this counts for buying things from Target or normal places/big box places. If they have like pride gear and stuff? Do you still buy from them?
 

shittim

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2016
2,766
1,043
113
#8
yes, Target doesn't let Salvation Army set up, they have a pretty unholy agenda so I haven't been there in years, so I do think of the trail my G-d given resources take.
Do you suppose that is under "every thought, word, and deed?"
blessings
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
6,663
2,514
113
#9
hmm well when buying a car do your homework and check it out before you buy, get a mechanic to check it...find out where its from and where its made...its like anything you purchase really.

The other thing is you dont have to buy it you can just borrow it. eg with books from the library.
You use you discernment and you dont just buy anything for the sake of buying something.

I havent bought any 'art' in ages and ages its not something I really do, but in the past before I was a Christian I would spend pocket money on music, it would be secular, but I have stopped actually buying music when I can make my own or just listen for free online.

people with money to spare often worry about ethical purchasing and I think they are quite right to be actually thinking about where their money is going. Is it supporting sweatshops and slavery, are profits going to some big conglomerate? Can you do without the product? Can you make it yourself? Is it good quality or cheap and nasty? How many miles has it taken to get that product to your door? aside from which is the item pleasing to God? is it useful or beautiful? Does it have meaning?
 

shittim

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2016
2,766
1,043
113
#10
It is well and blessed that those who are born again and Spirit filled can access the wisdom of Holy Spirit and not lean on their own understanding, thank you for bringing this up.
 

Billyd

Senior Member
May 8, 2014
3,462
385
83
#11
If it makes you happy, and you have enough money to pay for it, buy it. Just make sure that enough money doesn't include God's share.
 

Subhumanoidal

Well-known member
Sep 17, 2018
1,834
1,494
113
#12
So I’m an artist, and I love being able to support other artists by buying their wares. Prints, pins, charms, and the like. But there arises a problem when it comes to the person’s personal beliefs and their art. Usually those things go hand in hand, as often times an artist will make things based on those beliefs. But when it’s an artist making say, a fan art of something with sonic. the hedgehog, and I’d love to buy it. Well then I see that it comes with a free pride flag per purchase. Here lies the dilemma: I didn’t purchase anything having to do with gay pride, but once that comes in the scenario doesn’t it become in a way supporting that movement?

When you get art of something you like and the artist HAPPENS to be into something you don’t like, I would imagine it would be like the scenario of eating at someone’s house. You don’t worry if it’s been blessed by an idol, you ask God to bless it and go on. But if the person is specifically using their unrelated art to push a certain massage you don’t agree with...what then? Do you buy the art and refuse the gay pride flag? That may be enough to mitigate the situation. But say it’s a friend whose art you love, but find out they’re in some kind of cult or dabble occasionally in occultism just for the fun of it? What do you do then?

Many people are able to separate an artist from their art, but I often find that difficult. Say I like an artist but then find out they’re on the internet making antisemitic remarks, that fool is gonna be dropped and blocked in a second. But what about something else? Like buying a car or a tool kit? I know that it’s pretty impossible to know everyone’s leanings when making a purchase, but what if it’s SUPER obvious?
Ever go to the grocery store and buy food? Or restaurants to eat? Store to buy clothes? Buy a car? Car repair? Most places you pay for services will support causes you disagree with. Does it bother you everywhere else?
 

SoulWeaver

Senior Member
Oct 25, 2014
2,922
754
113
#13
Always do according to your conscience. If something is going to make you unsettled spiritually and cause you doubts, I'd avoid it. There are other occasions and causes where you will have opportunity to give - you can pray and God will direct you towards these. Jesus said it is your own words that justify or condemn you. So even if other people say something is not wrong, if you believe in your heart that it is wrong to do and yet do it, you have been condemned. Romans 14 teaches that we should follow what we are personally convicted of.