Baptism: is it required to be baptized in water?

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mailmandan

Senior Member
Apr 7, 2014
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#21
Baptism is remission of sin, if you don't get baptized you carry them with you.
Remission of sin is SIGNIFIED, yet not procured in water baptism. ..whoever believes in Him receives remission of sins (Acts 10:43) BEFORE water baptism (Acts 10:47).
 

Huckleberry

Senior Member
Aug 25, 2013
1,632
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#22
The importance of water baptism is that is a public demonstration of one's faith in Jesus Christ!
Exactly.
I once heard it analogized as putting on the ring at your wedding.
The ring isn't what makes you married,
it's the publicly seen evidence that you're married.
 

notuptome

Senior Member
May 17, 2013
11,311
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#23
Philip in Acts 8:26-27 gives clear teaching on water baptism. It is an ordinance reserved for believers not unbelievers.

Holy Spirit baptism saves and water baptism testifies to the new birth effected by the Holy Spirit.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
 
S

sevenseas

Guest
#25
I'm liking this trend of avatars of animals with glasses reading. (Try to find Joidevevre's new avatar. lol)

found it

very cute teddy with glasses which I am sure is a fav of yours ;)
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
7,433
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#26
we definitely believe in 'water-baptism' - 'if it's done in Faith', otherwise you just get WET'...
also when and where it takes place, will be the decision of The Holy Spirit...

ACTS 2:38.
'Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in The Name of Jesus Christ
for the remission of sins, and you shall receive the gift of The Holy Ghost.'

this is not the 'whole-puzzle' but just a piece of it...

just like, when Jesus said to the man that asked Him, 'what shall I do to inherit Eternal Life?'
and Jesus said, 'Keep the Commandments and you shall enter into life'.

in another place it says, 'Believe on The Lord, Jesus Christ, and you will be saved'.
and again, 'we are Baptized into His 'death and burial', that as He rose from the dead,
that we may walk in 'newness of Life'.

the scriptures are put together in such a way that we can't just go to 'one' of them
and form a doctrine or opinion,
it's our job to 'seek the whole council of God'...
 

hornetguy

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2016
4,994
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#27
I believe water baptism is necessary... we are not only told to do so, we are shown by many examples that it was a part of the conversion/salvation process, and usually took place at the same time the person accepted the free gift of salvation...

I don't believe water baptism saves us... we are saved solely by the grace of God through Jesus' sacrifice. But it is our outward sign that we have joined with God in the new covenant... it serves the same purpose that circumcision did for the Hebrews...

It is an outward sign that we have joined with God in His new covenant with His people.

How many of the Hebrews do you think refused circumcision, when God ordained it? I imagine NONE....
But, heck, if there is ANYTHING I would want to "discuss" with God, it would be the act of circumcision.... :eek:

Baptism, in comparison, is such a simple thing.... but we are still commanded to do it. Arguing about whether we "should" or not, to me, is an incredible insult to God...
 

mailmandan

Senior Member
Apr 7, 2014
14,818
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#28
the scriptures are put together in such a way that we can't just go to 'one' of them
and form a doctrine or opinion, it's our job to 'seek the whole council of God'...
When seeking the whole council of God, it's our job to rightly divide the word of truth and properly harmonize scripture with scripture.

we definitely believe in 'water-baptism' - 'if it's done in Faith', otherwise you just get WET'...
also when and where it takes place, will be the decision of The Holy Spirit...
We need to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ in order to become saved (Acts 16:31). Water baptism follows (Acts 10:43-47; 11:17,18; 16:31-34).

ACTS 2:38.
'Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in The Name of Jesus Christ
for the remission of sins, and you shall receive the gift of The Holy Ghost.'

this is not the 'whole-puzzle' but just a piece of it...
In Acts 2:38, "for the remission of sins" does not refer back to both clauses, "you all repent" and "each one of you be baptized," but refers only to the first. Peter is saying "repent unto the remission of your sins," the same as in Acts 3:19. The clause "each one of you be baptized" is parenthetical. This is exactly what Acts 3:19 teaches except that Peter omits the parenthesis.

Also compare the fact that these Gentiles in Acts 10:45 received the gift of the Holy Spirit (compare with Acts 2:38 - the gift of the Holy Spirit) and this was BEFORE water baptism (Acts 10:47).

Again, in Acts 10:43, we read ..whoever believes in Him receives remission of sins. These Gentiles received the gift of the Holy Spirit - Acts 10:45 when they believed on the Lord Jesus Christ - Acts 11:17 - (compare with Acts 16:31 - Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved) BEFORE water baptism - Acts 10:47 - this is referred to as repentance unto life - Acts 11:18.

So the only logical conclusion *when properly harmonizing scripture with scripture* is that faith in Jesus Christ "implied in genuine repentance" (rather than water baptism) brings the remission of sins and the gift of the Holy Spirit (Luke 24:47; Acts 2:38; 3:19; 5:31; 10:43-47; 11:17,18; 15:8,9; 16:31; 26:18). *Perfect Harmony*

just like, when Jesus said to the man that asked Him, 'what shall I do to inherit Eternal Life?'
and Jesus said, 'Keep the Commandments and you shall enter into life'.
Jesus showed the rich young ruler how short he falls of keeping the first commandment (Exodus 20:3) which is the first of the two great commandments (Deuteronomy 6:5; Matthew 22:37). The rich young ruler confidently and (self righteously) declared that he has kept the commandments from his youth up and qualified for heaven under those terms. Yet Jesus knew the man's wealth had become his idolatrous god, which kept him from believing in Jesus.

The rich young ruler missed the point that Jesus was making, failed to place his faith in Jesus for salvation, and continued instead to trust in his riches (vs. 21-23). His face fell and he went away sad because he could not part from his great wealth, not even in exchange for eternal life. If keeping the commandments is the basis by which we receive eternal life, then why isn't this remark the pattern for all discussions concerning eternal life? Paul would have said to the jailer who asked, "what must I do to be saved?" by replying in Acts 16:31 - keep the commandments, yet that's not what Paul said.

Jesus knows the hearts of all men and responds to each individual a little differently because He knows where their need is. He didn't respond to the woman at the well, or to Nicodemus or to the rich young ruler the same way, yet the consistent pattern in scripture is salvation by grace through faith, not works (Ephesians 2:8,9).

in another place it says, 'Believe on The Lord, Jesus Christ, and you will be saved'.
and again, 'we are Baptized into His 'death and burial', that as He rose from the dead,
that we may walk in 'newness of Life'.
These Gentiles in Acts 11:17 received the gift of the Holy Spirit when they believed on the Lord Jesus Christ and this was BEFORE water baptism. So it was established that they believed and were saved BEFORE water baptism (Acts 10:43-47). Water baptism is the picture, but not the reality. As Greek scholar AT Robertson points out - "A symbol is not the reality, but the picture of the reality."
 

graceNpeace

Senior Member
Aug 12, 2016
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#29
Many posters, including myself have shown that water baptism is not important for salvation.
However, as believers, water baptism is very important as a public demonstration or witness of our belief in the Lord Jesus Christ!

As such, I would encourage any and all believers who have not been water baptised to go ahead and be water baptised!
 
Nov 22, 2015
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#30
Many posters, including myself have shown that water baptism is not important for salvation.
However, as believers, water baptism is very important as a public demonstration or witness of our belief in the Lord Jesus Christ!

As such, I would encourage any and all believers who have not been water baptised to go ahead and be water baptised!
Amen! I love watching people get water baptized after they have received Christ and the forgiveness of sins. We "get" to be water baptized! What a blessing from our Lord.
 

mailmandan

Senior Member
Apr 7, 2014
14,818
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#31
Amen! I love watching people get water baptized after they have received Christ and the forgiveness of sins. We "get" to be water baptized! What a blessing from our Lord.
Amen! We had 7 new converts get water baptized at my church last Sunday and it was a wonderful blessing! I myself could not wait to get water baptized on a Sunday morning several years ago AFTER I received Christ through faith and was saved the night before.

Water baptism needs to be put it in it's proper place, subsequent to saving faith in Christ as all good works must be. Water baptism is for believers, and believers are already saved by grace through faith and not by rites or religious works, or good works. Now this does not remove good works from the Christian life. It just puts them in their proper place--subsequent to regeneration and salvation.
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
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#32
Does Acts 2:38 teach that baptism is necessary for salvation?

Acts 2:38, “And Peter said to them, ‘Repent, and let each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.’” As with any single verse or passage, we discern what it teaches by first filtering it through what we know the Bible teaches on the subject at hand. In the case of baptism and salvation, the Bible is clear that salvation is by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, not by works of any kind, including baptism (Ephesians 2:8-9). So, any interpretation which comes to the conclusion that baptism, or any other act, is necessary for salvation, is a faulty interpretation. For more information, please visit our webpage on "Is salvation by faith alone, or by faith plus works?"

Why, then, do some come to the conclusion that we must be baptized in order to be saved? Often, the discussion of whether or not this passage teaches baptism is required for salvation centers around the Greek word eis that is translated “for” in this passage. Those who hold to the belief that baptism is required for salvation are quick to point to this verse and the fact that it says “be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins,” assuming that the word translated “for” in this verse means “in order to get.” However, in both Greek and English, there are many possible usages of the word “for.”

As an example, when one says “Take two aspirin for your headache,” it is obvious to everybody that it does not mean “take two aspirin in order to get your headache,” but instead to “take two aspirin because you already have a headache.” There are three possible meanings of the word “for” that might fit the context of
Acts 2:38: 1--“in order to be, become, get, have, keep, etc.,” 2—“because of, as the result of,” or 3—“with regard to.” Since any one of the three meanings could fit the context of this passage, additional study is required in order to determine which one is correct.

We need to start by looking back to the original language and the meaning of the Greek word eis. This is a common Greek word (it is used 1774 times in the New Testament) that is translated many different ways. Like the English word “for” it can have several different meanings. So, again, we see at least two or three possible meanings of the passage, one that would seem to support that baptism is required for salvation and others that would not. While both the meanings of the Greek word eis are seen in different passages of Scripture, such noted Greek scholars as A.T. Robertson and J.R. Mantey have maintained that the Greek preposition eis in
Acts 2:38 should be translated “because of” or “in view of,” and not “in order to,” or “for the purpose of.”

One example of how this preposition is used in other Scriptures is seen in
Matthew 12:41 where the word eis communicates the “result” of an action. In this case it is said that the people of Nineveh “repented at the preaching of Jonah” (the word translated “at” is the same Greek word eis). Clearly, the meaning of this passage is that they repented “because of’” or “as the result of” Jonah’s preaching. In the same way, it would be possible that Acts 2:38 is indeed communicating the fact that they were to be baptized “as the result of” or “because” they already had believed and in doing so had already received forgiveness of their sins (John 1:12; John 3:14-18; John 5:24; John 11:25-26; Acts 10:43; Acts 13:39; Acts 16:31; Acts 26:18; Romans 10:9; Ephesians 1:12-14). This interpretation of the passage is also consistent with the message recorded in Peter’s next two sermons to unbelievers where he associates the forgiveness of sins with the act of repentance and faith in Christ without even mentioning baptism (Acts 3:17-26; Acts 4:8-12).

In addition to
Acts 2:38, there are three other verses where the Greek word eis is used in conjunction with the word “baptize” or “baptism.” The first of these is Matthew 3:11, “baptize you with water for repentance.” Clearly the Greek word eis cannot mean “in order to get” in this passage. They were not baptized “in order to get repentance,” but were “baptized because they had repented.” The second passage is Romans 6:3 where we have the phrase “baptized into (eis) His death.” This again fits with the meaning “because of” or in "regard to." The third and final passage is 1 Corinthians 10:2 and the phrase “baptized into (eis) Moses in the cloud and in the sea.” Again, eis cannot mean “in order to get” in this passage because the Israelites were not baptized in order to get Moses to be their leader, but because he was their leader and had led them out of Egypt. If one is consistent with the way the preposition eis is used in conjunction with baptism, we must conclude that Acts 2:38 is indeed referring to their being baptized “because” they had received forgiveness of their sins. Some other verses where the Greek preposition eis does not mean “in order to obtain” are Matthew 28:19; 1 Peter 3:21; Acts 19:3; 1 Corinthians 1:15; and 12:13.

The grammatical evidence surrounding this verse and the preposition eis are clear that while both views on this verse are well within the context and the range of possible meanings of the passage, the majority of the evidence is in favor that the best possible definition of the word “for” in this context is either “because of” or “in regard to” and not “in order to get.” Therefore,
Acts 2:38, when interpreted correctly, does not teach that baptism is required for salvation.

Besides the precise meaning of the preposition translated “for” in this passage, there is another grammatical aspect of this verse to carefully consider—the change between the second person and third person between the verbs and pronouns in the passage. For example, in Peter’s commands to repent and be baptized the Greek verb translated “repent” is in the second person plural while the verb “be baptized,” is in the third person singular. When we couple this with the fact that the pronoun “your” in the phrase “forgiveness of your sins” is also second person plural, we see an important distinction being made that helps us understand this passage. The result of this change from second person plural to third person singular and back would seem to connect the phrase “forgiveness of your sins” directly with the command to “repent.” Therefore, when you take into account the change in person and plurality, essentially what you have is “You (plural) repent for the forgiveness of your (plural) sins, and let each one (singular) of you be baptized (singular).” Or, to put it in a more distinct way: “You all repent for the forgiveness of all of your sins, and let each one of you be baptized.”

Another error that is made by those who believe
Acts 2:38 teaches baptism is required for salvation is what is sometimes called the Negative Inference Fallacy. Simply put, this is the idea that just because a statement is true, we cannot assume all negations (or opposites) of that statement are true. In other words, just because Acts 2:38 says “repent and be baptized….for the forgiveness of sins…and the gift of the Holy Spirit,” it does not mean that if one repents and is not baptized, he will not receive forgiveness of sins or the gift of the Holy Spirit.

There is an important difference between a condition of salvation and a requirement for salvation. The Bible is clear that belief is both a condition and a requirement, but the same cannot be said for baptism. The Bible does not say that if a man is not baptized then he will not be saved. One can add any number of conditions to faith (which is required for salvation), and the person can still be saved. For example if a person believes, is baptized, goes to church, and gives to the poor he will be saved. Where the error in thinking occurs is if one assumes all these other conditions, “baptism, going to church, giving to the poor,” are required for one to be saved. While they might be the evidence of salvation, they are not a requirement for salvation. (For a more thorough explanation of this logical fallacy, please see the Question:
Does Mark 16:16 teach that baptism is required for salvation?).

The fact that baptism is not required to receive forgiveness and the gift of the Holy Spirit should also be evident by simply reading a little farther in the book of Acts. In
Acts 10:43, Peter tells Cornelius that “through His name everyone who believes in Him receives forgiveness of sins” (please note that nothing at this point has been mentioned about being baptized, yet Peter connects believing in Christ with the act of receiving forgiveness for sins). The next thing that happens is, having believed Peter’s message about Christ, the “Holy Spirit fell upon all those who were listening to the message” (Acts 10:44). It is only after they had believed, and therefore received forgiveness of their sins and the gift of the Holy Spirit, that Cornelius and his household were baptized (Acts 10:47-48). The context and the passage are very clear; Cornelius and his household received both forgiveness of sins and the Holy Spirit before they were ever baptized. In fact, the reason Peter allowed them to be baptized was that they showed evidence of receiving the Holy Spirit “just as Peter and the Jewish believers” had.

In conclusion,
Acts 2:38 does not teach that baptism is required for salvation. While baptism is important as the sign that one has been justified by faith and as the public declaration of one’s faith in Christ and membership in a local body of believers, it is not the means of remission or forgiveness of sins. The Bible is very clear that we are saved by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone (John 1:12; John 3:16; Acts 16:31; Romans 3:21-30; Romans 4:5; Romans 10:9-10; Ephesians 2:8-10; Philippians 3:9; Galatians 2:16).
https://www.gotquestions.org/baptism-Acts-2-38.html
 

graceNpeace

Senior Member
Aug 12, 2016
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#33
Exactly.
I once heard it analogized as putting on the ring at your wedding.
The ring isn't what makes you married,
it's the publicly seen evidence that you're married.
I like this illustration a lot.
If I use it I will have to acknowledge you as my source!
 

OneFaith

Senior Member
Sep 5, 2016
1,836
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#34
This came up in another thread and I didn't want to move that thread off topic so I started another.

Is it required to be baptized in water?

Personally, I do not believe it is required.
When Philip and the Ethiopian Eunich stopped the chariot to perform baptism, they stopped where they did because there was much water. (Water)

Before they stopped the chariot, the Eunich said "Look, here is water, what prevents me from being baptized?

John baptized people in the Jorden river. (Water)

Ananias told Paul "What are you waiting for, arise, be baptized and wash away your sins- calling on the name of the Lord." (Water)

1 Peter 3:21 compares Noah's ark to the baptism that now saves us. (Water)

Jesus said to Nicademas you must be born of water and the Spirit.

Peter said "Repent every one of you and baptized for the remission of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. So they got baptized, and many were added to their number that day of those being saved.

During baptism God performs circumcision of the heart. (Col2)

Romans 6:3 "Or do you not know that all of you who were baptized into Christ were baptized into His death?"

When we get baptized we die to ourselves, bury our old sinful self in the watery grave of baptism, and are raised a new creature alive with the Holy Spirit.

The Bible says that the gospel is the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Bible also says that we must obey the gospel. "With flames of fire (hell) He will take vengeance on those who know not God, and who obey not the gospel of His Son." We have plenty of examples of obeying the gospel, and they all use water. (Full immersion).

Baptism means a death, burial, and resurrection. Long after Jesus was baptized (because we must follow His lead), He said that He has a baptism to undergo, and how the thought of it torments Him until it's done. He meant His death on the cross, His burial, and resurrection.
 

Dagallen

Senior Member
Jan 16, 2017
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#35
Water baptism will save no one but spiritual baptism will and does save, it's not the flesh that shall be save but it is
the spirit that is save from the ways of the flesh.
 
Jun 20, 2017
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#36
Baptism fulfills all righteousness allowing the Holy Spirit to come into you. Any response from anyone that agrees with me or not
 

graceNpeace

Senior Member
Aug 12, 2016
2,180
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#37
Baptism fulfills all righteousness allowing the Holy Spirit to come into you. Any response from anyone that agrees with me or not
Wrong!
If you are referring to water baptism.
Water baptism is for those who are already believers - the Holy spirit is already resident.
Water baptism is a pubic demonstration of an already evident inward reality!
 

MattforJesus

Senior Member
Apr 15, 2017
1,260
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#38
Mar 16:16 He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned.

1Pe 3:19 By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison;
1Pe 3:20 Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.
1Pe 3:21 The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Joh 3:5 Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
Joh 3:6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.
Joh 3:7 Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again.

Rom 6:3 Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?
Rom 6:4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
Rom 6:5 For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection.

Col 2:12 Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.

We have to identify with the man Christ Jesus,who died,was buried,and resurrected from the dead,by repenting of our sins,being water baptized,and receiving the Holy Spirit.

Luk 23:39 And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us.
Luk 23:40 But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation?
Luk 23:41 And we indeed justly; for we receive the due reward of our deeds: but this man hath done nothing amiss.
Luk 23:42 And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.
Luk 23:43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise.

Baptism can be bypassed if it is no fault of the person,as the thief on the cross,but the Bible says baptism does now also save us,and Mark said he who believes and is baptized shall be saved.

There are some dangerous pratices out there,confessing sins to a priest,and then is it effective,baptism is not essential for salvation,so some will bypass it for it does not matter to them,sin does not affect their relationship with God,so some people hold unto sins thinking they are alright,and then the blood of Christ cannot wash it away.
 
Oct 6, 2017
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#39
Baptism according to scripture is a very important sacrament, however, Paul absolutely clears up the matter by completely removing baptism from the equation of Salvation. He plainly states that Jesus Christ said baptism was not a part of the Gospel, look at 1 Cor. 1:17, For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: This verse clearly removes baptism from the gospel. He said that Christ sent him, not to baptize but preach the gospel. If baptism was required to be saved would Paul have minimized it? Read 1 Cor. 1:14 I think God that I baptized none of you, but Crispus and Gaius. WOW! did Paul just lose his concern for lost people? Or, maybe it clears the water (NPI) about baptism be a part of Salvation. We must be concerned about obeying the commands of Christ, but we must also be careful to always rightly divide the word of God. Especially concerning our salvation. This passage of scripture alone should clear-up any question's about adding to the gospel of Christ. I think we should be very careful. God has done all the work for our salvation, our part is to believe it, turn from our sin, and be obedient. The first command of a Christian is to be baptized to identify with Him after we are saved. But , in no way according to Jesus Christ does baptism play any part in obtaining salvation. ( "Chris sent me not to baptize...")
 
Oct 26, 2017
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#40
This came up in another thread and I didn't want to move that thread off topic so I started another.

Is it required to be baptized in water?

Personally, I do not believe it is required.
______

For OBEDIENCE and SALVATION......yes baptism is a MUST......not an option.

Christ commanded it....and Philip obviously PREACHED the necessity of BAPTISM to the Eunuch.

Acts 8:35-38

35....Then Philip opened his mouth, and began at the same scripture, and preached unto him JESUS

Philip did well. He taught the eunuch about BAPTISM and the eunuch understood the urgency of being baptize and wanted to do it right away. He did not want to wait until he got back home. IMMEDIATELY he and Philip went down into the water. If it was not necessary for salvation WHY couldn't he WAIT until he got back to his home??
PAUL pictures BAPTISM as a type of resurrection with Christ, also as His death and burial. {Rom. 6:4..Col. 2:12}
Considering CHRIST Himself said in Mark 16:16 those who believe, AND {which means Plus /in addition to}...is BAPTIZED shall be saved, it is totally logical to believe that CHRIST meant what He said and said what HE meant.

Mark 16:16 Christ said: He that believes....AND {meaning PLUS / in ADDITION TO}...is BAPTIZED,...SHALL BE SAVED; he that believeth not shall be damned.

Will someone who does NOT believe, be baptized?
Does not that scripture say that belief AND baptism saves?
I think it does.

Just something to ponder....have a blessed day