Good Friday?

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Webers.Home

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May 28, 2018
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#1
.
Matt 12:40 . . For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of
a huge fish, so the Son of Man will be three days and three nights in the
heart of the earth.

Some years ago a skeptic asked me how to get three days and three nights
between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning. It was an embarrassing
moment.

Well; Passover and Easter Sunday are just around the corner. So . . . .
_
 

Deuteronomy

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Jun 11, 2018
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#4
Here is some commentary on Matthew 12:40 from Dr. Carson that may be useful.

Jonah spent “three days and three nights” in the fish (Jonah 1:17). But if the normal sequence of Passion Week is correct (see on 26:17–30), Jesus was in the tomb only about thirty-six hours. Since they included parts of three days, by Jewish reckoning Jesus was buried “three days” or, to put it another way, he rose “on the third day” (16:21). But this does not cover more than two nights. Some advocate a Wednesday crucifixion date (see on 26:17); but though that allows for “three days and three nights,” it runs into difficulty with “on the third day.” In rabbinical thought a day and a night make an ōnâh, and a part of an ōnâh is as the whole (cf. SBK, 1:649, for references; cf. further 1 Sam 30:12–13; 2 Chronicles 10:5, 12; Esth 4:16; 5:1). Thus according to Jewish tradition, “three days and three nights” need mean no more than “three days” or the combination of any part of three separate days. --Carson, D. A. (1984). Matthew. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Matthew, Mark, Luke (Vol. 8, p. 296).

~Deut
 

Webers.Home

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#5
.
When Jesus was here, days were, at the most, only 12 hours.

John 11:9-10 . . Are there not twelve hours in the day? If anyone walks in
the day, he does not stumble, because he sees the light of this world. But if
anyone walks in the night, he stumbles, because the light is not in him.

This world's light is of course the Sun as per Gen 1:14-18. So then, when
Jesus was here; day was when the sun is up and night was when the sun is
down; meaning of course that the three days and three nights of Matt 12:40
indicate three times when the sun was up, and three times when the sun
was down; i.e. relative to Christ's crucifixion and resurrection: days began
with sunrise and nights began with sundown.

NOTE: Days divided into twelve equal periods of sunlight were regulated by
what's known as temporal hours; which vary in length in accordance with
the time of year. There are times of the year at Jerusalem's latitude when
this world's light consists of less than 12 normal hours of sun, and
sometimes more; but when Jesus was here; the official number of hours was
always twelve regardless.

I don't exactly know why the Jews of that era divided their days into twelve
equal periods of sunlight regardless of the seasons, but I suspect it was just
a convenient way to operate the government and conduct civil affairs;
including the Temple's activities (e.g. the daily morning and evening
sacrifices)
_
 

Deuteronomy

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Jun 11, 2018
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#7
Here is another interesting, well-argued view from Dr. Boise (though I should mention that most of my commentaries align themselves with a Dr. Carson's traditional view). It's also interesting to note how much controversy there is surrounding v40, including the differences of opinion about what the "sign" of Jonah actually was, to the fact the v40 may have not been part of Matthew's Autograph.

In the traditional handling of the events of Passion Week, Jesus was crucified on a Friday and was raised from the dead on Sunday morning. All four Gospel writers placed the crucifixion on the day immediately preceding a normal Saturday Sabbath (see Matt. 27:62; Mark 15:42; Luke 23:54; and John 19:31). Yet if that is a correct understanding of these events, how can it be said that Jesus spent “three days and three nights” in the earth?

According to Jewish idiom, the phrase “three days” does not necessarily mean a period of seventy-two hours. It can mean merely one whole day plus parts of two others. But while this observation helps us deal with texts that say “three days,” it does not help us deal with Matthew’s version of the prophecy, for here the phrase is not “three days” but rather “three days and three nights.”
It is possible that parts of one day and one night are involved, rather than three full days and three full nights; nevertheless, three periods of light and three periods of darkness must be accounted for. This requirement, regardless of anything else, is fatal to a Friday crucifixion theory. As one writer says, “Add to the indictment of Friday the statement of the two disciples on the way to Emmaus, spoken on the afternoon of Sunday (Luke 24:21), ‘Today is the third day since these things were done,’ and the case looks black indeed against Friday. Sunday is not the third day since Friday.”

There is another difficulty too, a difficulty apparent to anyone who has tried to sort out the events of the final Passover Week and assign them days. On an average, about one-third of the Gospels is taken up with the events of the last week of Christ’s life. This means that the events of this week are given to us in fairly complete detail. Indeed, from the arrival of Jesus in Bethany, six days before the Passover, until the resurrection, every moment seems to be accounted for. Yet when the events of these days are pieced together into one connected whole, one entire day, and possibly two, is lacking. One of the missing days can be explained as the preceding Sabbath, a day in which Jesus rested in Bethany and received those who came to see him and Lazarus. But what of the other day? Can it really be that in a week as full as this one was, one entire day is unaccounted for? How can we explain this omission?

The difficulty of accounting for this day led no less careful a scholar than Frederick Godet to move the events of Palm Sunday to Monday, thereby compressing six days of activity into five. This is interesting, but the same effect can be achieved by moving the crucifixion back to Thursday rather than by moving the events of Palm Sunday forward.
A third difficulty is of a more recent development. The dating of historical events has been a complicated matter, involving the days and times of solar and lunar eclipses and new moons. But in recent years, thanks to the use of computers, much that was formerly uncertain is now known. Thus, to give an example, as recently as 1973 a work entitled New and Full Moons by Herman H. Goldstine was published, from which it is possible to calculate the days of the week on which the Jewish Passover fell in any given year during Christ’s lifetime or thereafter. If such a calculation established a Saturday Passover and therefore a Friday crucifixion for any year near the time at which Jesus must have been crucified, it would provide excellent support for the traditional theory. But, in fact, it does not. Instead, the day before Passover falls on a Friday only in the year A.D. 26, which is too early, and in the year A.D. 33, which most scholars agree is too late.

What are we to do with these problems? Is there a solution? I believe there is and that it is obviously the solution, once we get over the idea that the crucifixion must have been on a Friday, as tradition says. The solution is simply that two Sabbaths were involved in this last week of Christ’s earthly ministry. One was the regular weekly Sabbath, which always fell on Saturday. The second was an extra Passover Sabbath, which, in this particular week, must have come on a Friday.


It needs to be said, in case it is not entirely self-evident, that the Passover Sabbath always came on the fifteenth of the month of Nisan and would therefore naturally fall on different days of the week in different years, as Christmas does in our day. However, it was always observed as a Sabbath. In my reconstruction Jesus would have been crucified on Thursday and would have been raised from the dead sometime before dawn on Sunday morning. --Boice, J. M. (2001). The Gospel of Matthew (pp. 220–222). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

~Deut
 

obedienttogod

Well-known member
Jan 3, 2019
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#8




IMA LOVING this ^ inscription timeline portion of Leviticus 23:11


Hebrew
Vayikra - Leviticus - Chapter 23

Vayikra (Leviticus) 23:11
יאוְהֵנִ֧יף אֶת־הָעֹ֛מֶר לִפְנֵ֥י יְהֹוָ֖ה לִרְצֹֽנְכֶ֑ם
מִמָּֽחֳרַת֙ הַשַּׁבָּ֔ת יְנִיפֶ֖נּוּ הַכֹּהֵֽן:


English:
11 And he shall wave the omer before the Lord so that it will be acceptable for you; the kohen shall wave it on the day after the rest day.

the KJV
11 And he shall wave the sheaf before the LORD, to be accepted for you: on the morrow after the sabbath the priest shall wave it.



This shows Yeshua in the fullness of God's Power and Equality to Yahweh, as He was when He was Abram's (Abraham's) High Priest Melchizedek, HE (Yeshua), as our official High Priest, waved the OMER (עומר) (mathematically speaking, grain scale denomination equaling a tenth part) - (So, even though it does not reference paying a TENTH in TITHES in the New Covenant, Yeshua as our High Priest paid the first 10% of TITHING to the New Covenant Himself, to the body of Christ!!) as the KOHEN (כהן) (HIGH PRIEST) on the morrow of the Sabbath after Passover.




Examples of kohen

In fact, the High Priest, whose role it was to preserve peace among the Jews and between(OUR MEDIATOR) God and His children below, was called a kohen .
 

Webers.Home

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May 28, 2018
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#9
.
In the very beginning, God made a distinct difference between night and day
on Earth; so that His day on Earth is not a 24-hour amalgam of light and
dark; rather, His day on Earth is when the Sun is up, and His night on Earth
is when the Sun is down.

Gen 1:4-5 . . God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the
light day, and the darkness he called night.

Gen 1:14 . . And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the
heaven to divide the day from the night

Gen 1:16 . .And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the
day, and the lesser light to rule the night.

Gen 1:17-18 . . And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give
light upon the earth, and to rule over the day and over the night, and to
divide the light from the darkness.

If only people kept those God-given physical characteristics in mind when
working with Matt 12:40, their calculations would be greatly simplified.
_
 

cv5

Well-known member
Nov 20, 2018
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#10
Probly because Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday or a Thursday, rather than on a Friday.

Explanation of the three days and three nights.
No sir. Crucified and died about 3pm Friday, buried before sundown, rose early Sunday before the women arrived. Three days and three nights is an idiom. We still use similar expressions today....but you do not notice it happening.
 

cv5

Well-known member
Nov 20, 2018
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#11
Here is some commentary on Matthew 12:40 from Dr. Carson that may be useful.

Jonah spent “three days and three nights” in the fish (Jonah 1:17). But if the normal sequence of Passion Week is correct (see on 26:17–30), Jesus was in the tomb only about thirty-six hours. Since they included parts of three days, by Jewish reckoning Jesus was buried “three days” or, to put it another way, he rose “on the third day” (16:21). But this does not cover more than two nights. Some advocate a Wednesday crucifixion date (see on 26:17); but though that allows for “three days and three nights,” it runs into difficulty with “on the third day.” In rabbinical thought a day and a night make an ōnâh, and a part of an ōnâh is as the whole (cf. SBK, 1:649, for references; cf. further 1 Sam 30:12–13; 2 Chronicles 10:5, 12; Esth 4:16; 5:1). Thus according to Jewish tradition, “three days and three nights” need mean no more than “three days” or the combination of any part of three separate days. --Carson, D. A. (1984). Matthew. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Matthew, Mark, Luke (Vol. 8, p. 296).

~Deut
Absolutely correct.....
 

garee

Senior Member
Mar 28, 2016
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#12
Here is some commentary on Matthew 12:40 from Dr. Carson that may be useful.

Jonah spent “three days and three nights” in the fish (Jonah 1:17). But if the normal sequence of Passion Week is correct (see on 26:17–30), Jesus was in the tomb only about thirty-six hours. Since they included parts of three days, by Jewish reckoning Jesus was buried “three days” or, to put it another way, he rose “on the third day” (16:21). But this does not cover more than two nights. Some advocate a Wednesday crucifixion date (see on 26:17); but though that allows for “three days and three nights,” it runs into difficulty with “on the third day.” In rabbinical thought a day and a night make an ōnâh, and a part of an ōnâh is as the whole (cf. SBK, 1:649, for references; cf. further 1 Sam 30:12–13; 2 Chronicles 10:5, 12; Esth 4:16; 5:1). Thus according to Jewish tradition, “three days and three nights” need mean no more than “three days” or the combination of any part of three separate days. --Carson, D. A. (1984). Matthew. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Matthew, Mark, Luke (Vol. 8, p. 296).

~Deut
“Three days and three nights” in the fish (Jonah 1:17) “Three days and three nights” in the heart earth. They must be reconciled. What does “Three days and three nights” in the Tomb mean? There is no reference as that? We know it mean a living sacrifice as with Jonas who was rescued by another.

When did the Son of man Jesus begin to suffer as unto death when the father started to pour out the wrath of mankind on Him? I would think the garden began the three day three night demonstration called the heart of the earth .

Matthew 26:38 Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me.

Mark 14:34 And saith unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry ye here, and watch.

Luke 22:44 And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
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#13
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Matt 12:40 . . For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of
a huge fish, so the Son of Man will be three days and three nights in the
heart of the earth.


Some years ago a skeptic asked me how to get three days and three nights
between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning. It was an embarrassing
moment.


Well; Passover and Easter Sunday are just around the corner. So . . . .
_
Scripture does not say when Christ left the tomb alive, it tells us when it was DISCOVERED that he left the tomb.

There is also a possibility that when God said he created the world in a certain way that it is actually the way God created it. In Genesis it tells us he worked for six days at the creation, but the creation God did for the seventh day was to create a day for humans to rest in and the rest God spoke of was a complete one of spiritual and body rest. It took very few generations before man made up Gods, Nimrod was one of the first. He wanted worship to be of the sun, so he named the first day of the week Sunday and pagans have used this day for worship ever since.

When wars wiped out the Jewish leadership of Christianity so converted pagans took over, they kept the Sunday time of worship and we have done it ever since. Pagans at early Christianity time used seasons of the year and stars in their worship and Paul told people to not go by those things so today, it is said it is one of the reasons to keep Sunday worship. They also base it on the fact that it was discovered on Sunday that Christ had arisen.
 

AxeElf

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Mar 5, 2019
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#14
No sir. Crucified and died about 3pm Friday, buried before sundown, rose early Sunday before the women arrived. Three days and three nights is an idiom. We still use similar expressions today....but you do not notice it happening.
If you don't have pictures, I don't believe you.
 

AxeElf

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Mar 5, 2019
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#15
So then, when Jesus was here; day was when the sun is up and night was when the sun is down; meaning of course that the three days and three nights of Matt 12:40 indicate three times when the sun was up, and three times when the sun was down; i.e. relative to Christ's crucifixion and resurrection: days began with sunrise and nights began with sundown.
Wow, that's pretty revolutionary... Oh wait, that's exactly what day and night mean today. Never mind.

So there still were not three times when the sun was up and three times when the sun was down between Friday and Sunday.


In the very beginning, God made a distinct difference between night and day on Earth; so that His day on Earth is not a 24-hour amalgam of light and dark; rather, His day on Earth is when the Sun is up, and His night on Earth is when the Sun is down.
Another absolutely astonishing claim... Oh wait, no, that's still exactly what day and night mean today. Never mind.

And there's still not three times when the sun was up and three times when the sun was down between Friday and Sunday.


What's next, the claim that "afternoon" refers only to the time after noon, and not the time before noon?
 

Webers.Home

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May 28, 2018
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#16
.
Wow, that's pretty revolutionary... Oh wait, that's exactly what day and
night mean today.
It's necessary that we nail down the physical characteristics of night and day
because so many people have allowed 24-hour Jewish civil time to muddle
their understanding of Matt 12:40.

Here's another that pops up now and then.

Gen. 1:5 . . And the evening and the morning were the first day.

Creation days are very controversial and a special area of study all to
themselves. For example: chronologically evening and morning define
overnight which suggests that God did all of His creative work in the dark.

I highly recommend categorizing creation's days apart from normal days on
Earth in order to avoid confusion, especially when the preponderance of
evidence testifies that day is a time of light, and night is a time of darkness;
viz: day on Earth is when the sun is up, and night is when the sun is down.
_
 

Lanolin

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Dec 15, 2018
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#17
Remember back then they did not have the roman/georgian calendar with those names for those days of the week as the jewish calendar is lunar not solar.

Good Friday is the RCC designation for a holiday and Apparently they did not eat meat on Fridays either. I dont know why they name it good Friday good question! I guess its so everyone celebrating can have a long weekend...(3 days) but then what actually happens in practice is everyone gets easter Monday off as well.

When people argue about the days of the week well the Bible doesnt even have fridays, saturdays and sundays in it. Look and you will find no reference, and the months are not january, february, march etc either. They all have hebrew names.
 

Lanolin

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Dec 15, 2018
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#18
Also some churches celebrate 'holy thursday'.
 

cv5

Well-known member
Nov 20, 2018
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#19
Remember back then they did not have the roman/georgian calendar with those names for those days of the week as the jewish calendar is lunar not solar.

Good Friday is the RCC designation for a holiday and Apparently they did not eat meat on Fridays either. I dont know why they name it good Friday good question! I guess its so everyone celebrating can have a long weekend...(3 days) but then what actually happens in practice is everyone gets easter Monday off as well.

When people argue about the days of the week well the Bible doesnt even have fridays, saturdays and sundays in it. Look and you will find no reference, and the months are not january, february, march etc either. They all have hebrew names.
Doesn't matter. The Saturday Sabbath is the anchor. The former day and next day are sandwiched around this day and the time flow is uninterrupted.
 

Lanolin

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Dec 15, 2018
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#20
The passover feasts actually had extra sabbaths.