The Puritans

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calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
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Anaheim, Cali.
#1
Who were they and why were they exiled?

The Puritan’s Bible: The Bible every Puritan family had in their home was not the KJV of 1609 or 1611. The Bible which they carried was the Geneva Bible. The Geneva Bible was the most widely read and influential English Bible of the 16th and 17th centuries, which was printed from 1560 to 1644 in over 200 different printings. (co Christianity.com)

King James had the Bibles printed under his on authority and in his name to reinforce the Authority of royalty and contradict the radicalization by the Puritans that opposed obedience to perceived human authority and rulers. They only submitted to God according the scriptures that they studied. The King and the Pope had no ethical authority over true believers.

"Puritans" had been a name of ridicule first used during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. These were Christians who wanted the Church of England purified of any liturgy, ceremony, or practices which were not found in Scripture. The Bible was their sole authority, and with these beliefs, they believed it applied to every area and level of life.

Puritans Arrive in America

First came the Pilgrims in the 1620s. They were followed by thousands of Puritans in the 1630s, and these Puritans left their mark on their new land, becoming the most dynamic Christian force in the American colonies. Back in England, the Puritans had been people of means and political influence, but King Charles would not tolerate their attempts to reform the Church of England. Persecution mounted. To many, there seemed no hope but to leave England. Perhaps in America, they could establish a colony whose government, society and church were all based on the Bible. "New England" could become a light Old England could follow out of the darkness of corruption.
 

Mission21

Pathfinder
Mar 12, 2019
386
385
63
#2
Who were they and why were they exiled?

The Puritan’s Bible: The Bible every Puritan family had in their home was not the KJV of 1609 or 1611. The Bible which they carried was the Geneva Bible. The Geneva Bible was the most widely read and influential English Bible of the 16th and 17th centuries, which was printed from 1560 to 1644 in over 200 different printings. (co Christianity.com)

King James had the Bibles printed under his on authority and in his name to reinforce the Authority of royalty and contradict the radicalization by the Puritans that opposed obedience to perceived human authority and rulers. They only submitted to God according the scriptures that they studied. The King and the Pope had no ethical authority over true believers.

"Puritans" had been a name of ridicule first used during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. These were Christians who wanted the Church of England purified of any liturgy, ceremony, or practices which were not found in Scripture. The Bible was their sole authority, and with these beliefs, they believed it applied to every area and level of life.

Puritans Arrive in America

First came the Pilgrims in the 1620s. They were followed by thousands of Puritans in the 1630s, and these Puritans left their mark on their new land, becoming the most dynamic Christian force in the American colonies. Back in England, the Puritans had been people of means and political influence, but King Charles would not tolerate their attempts to reform the Church of England. Persecution mounted. To many, there seemed no hope but to leave England. Perhaps in America, they could establish a colony whose government, society and church were all based on the Bible. "New England" could become a light Old England could follow out of the darkness of corruption.
Good post / topic.
----
Many Christians in England & Continent ( not just Puritans.. ) came to North America.
- To escape persecution from 'Church establishment and State.'
---
Maybe we need to be reminded that part of history again.
 

calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
5,463
113
Anaheim, Cali.
#3
Good post / topic.
----
Many Christians in England & Continent ( not just Puritans.. ) came to North America.
- To escape persecution from 'Church establishment and State.'
---
Maybe we need to be reminded that part of history again.
Quakers and Mennonites are a couple of the examples that have progressed with time and are still here. The Amish and Hutterites got stuck in time. But they are still here too.
 

Deade

Called of God
Dec 17, 2017
16,135
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Vinita, Oklahoma, USA
yeshuaofisrael.org
#4
Quakers and Mennonites are a couple of the examples that have progressed with time and are still here. The Amish and Hutterites got stuck in time. But they are still here too.
If you have picked up on the story that some of the Puritans migrated to Holland before coming to America. They fled persecution in England.
 

calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
5,463
113
Anaheim, Cali.
#5
I was watching a documentary about King James and found part of his motivation for retranslating the bible was to curb puritanism and bolster the authority of the Royalty and the Church of England. I've never heard that before but it made sense so I diverted to a short study about the schism between the King and the Puritans. As a life long American who was taught that was part of the reason for the revolutionary war and the separation of church and state I thought it would be edifying. Also it cautions us not to deify politics or politicians. They all have feet of clay. That's the part history that isn't taught at Church or in school any more.
 
Aug 10, 2019
552
437
63
Canada
#6
I was watching a documentary about King James and found part of his motivation for retranslating the bible was to curb puritanism and bolster the authority of the Royalty and the Church of England. I've never heard that before but it made sense so I diverted to a short study about the schism between the King and the Puritans. As a life long American who was taught that was part of the reason for the revolutionary war and the separation of church and state I thought it would be edifying. Also it cautions us not to deify politics or politicians. They all have feet of clay. That's the part history that isn't taught at Church or in school any more.
I just finished reading a book on the history of the early church...up to the time of abour 350 AD. Interestingly many elements of the reformation movements were exant in the very early church....and a big point of contention was authority. While some followers pursued relationship the dominant, and ultimately winning, side were those who emphasised religion over relationship.....religion with a very rigid structure.
 

oyster67

Senior Member
May 24, 2014
5,492
4,492
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#8
It would be interesting to compare Geneva and KJV. Wasn't it Jesus and Paul who taught submission to the powers that be whenever possible? I can't see how that could be edited in or out. I'm glad that KJV still retains the content concerning how we must obey God rather than man at times.

Acts 5
5:27 And when they had brought them, they set [them] before the council: and the high priest asked them,
5:28 Saying, Did not we straitly command you that ye should not teach in this name? and, behold, ye have filled Jerusalem with your doctrine, and intend to bring this man's blood upon us.
5:29 Then Peter and the [other] apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men.
 

calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
5,463
113
Anaheim, Cali.
#9
Calibob, I found them on Wikipedia. They were called the Pilgrim Colony. You can read about them HERE
I'll do it later but I'm going to respond to so of the thing posted while @Magenta and I were reading 1 Kings and James. I'ts almost midnight now and my laptop is set to update at 1AM. See ya tomorrow my brother.
 

wattie

Senior Member
Feb 24, 2009
1,560
249
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#10
Its recorded in history that before Catholicism there were independent Christian churches that soundly believed the bible. The puritans were among these. There are other names also given to different groups of Christians that were around from before Catholicism that remained faithful
 

calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
5,463
113
Anaheim, Cali.
#11
It would be interesting to compare Geneva and KJV. Wasn't it Jesus and Paul who taught submission to the powers that be whenever possible? I can't see how that could be edited in or out. I'm glad that KJV still retains the content concerning how we must obey God rather than man at times.

Acts 5
5:27 And when they had brought them, they set [them] before the council: and the high priest asked them,
5:28 Saying, Did not we straitly command you that ye should not teach in this name? and, behold, ye have filled Jerusalem with your doctrine, and intend to bring this man's blood upon us.
5:29 Then Peter and the [other] apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men.
Well You are quite correct. The Geneva Bible was written independently of the Vatican and was an earlier version that helped in the post Luther reformation. It was translated from the Greek to German, word for word not English and was later translated into English. Thus the sentence structure and words chosen are quite akward. In a literary sence KJV's were masterpieces in their day's both the KJV 1609 & 1611's. It's not heretical at all, but the King's influence had put a pro authoritarian spin on it.

The truth is still in there. Like we are to obey and do what is good... Remember when Peter and John were brought before the Sanhedrin and ordered not to preach in Jesus's name?

Acts 4:18Then they called them in again and commanded them not to speak or teach at all in the name of Jesus. What did they do? vs:23 On their release, Peter and John returned to their own people and reported everything that the chief priests and elders had said to them.

Remember Henry the 8th defied the Pope when the Pope refused to annul his marriage to Catharine of Aragon So from that point although the Church of England had become sort of a copy of the RCC but without the Popes authority The King was still the king and believed that everybody was subservient to him. Christian radicals like Puritans and others who refused to recognize his authority became enemies of the crown.
 

Desdichado

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2014
8,417
622
113
#12
Great point. I'm something of an apologist for the Puritans- there are a ton of unflattering myths about them out there from every worldview of our day. But it must be remembered that America was settled by a patchwork of religious groups and there are a host of ramifications to go with that.

I think the Puritans are largely remembered for two reasons-

1. The North won the War, so the earliest Northern settlers became seen as the first proto-Americans.

2. If we're to draw a baseline between all the groups who arrived here (that I know of anyhow), they each retained a strong Christian Humanist conception of society. So while there were some very strong theological disputes, the colonies could broadly agree on what a virtuous republic looks like. The Puritans were the largest and most consistent group to "put it in writing", so they entrenched themselves in the popular imagination.



Good post / topic.
----
Many Christians in England & Continent ( not just Puritans.. ) came to North America.
- To escape persecution from 'Church establishment and State.'
---
Maybe we need to be reminded that part of history again.
 

Desdichado

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2014
8,417
622
113
#13
This is awesome, Calibob. Keep posting what you conclude from your research. You've hit the nail on the head a lot in this thread.

I was watching a documentary about King James and found part of his motivation for retranslating the bible was to curb puritanism and bolster the authority of the Royalty and the Church of England. I've never heard that before but it made sense so I diverted to a short study about the schism between the King and the Puritans. As a life long American who was taught that was part of the reason for the revolutionary war and the separation of church and state I thought it would be edifying. Also it cautions us not to deify politics or politicians. They all have feet of clay. That's the part history that isn't taught at Church or in school any more.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
14,280
6,649
113
#16
First came the Pilgrims in the 1620s. They were followed by thousands of Puritans in the 1630s,
The Pilgrims were not the same as the Puritans (even though many confuse the two groups).

The Pilgrims were Separatists who did not want to be associated with the Church of England (which was under the British monarch). They wanted to worship in a more biblical manner and had no interest in reforming the Church of England. They were of a more humble station in life and were Congregationaiists.

Puritans, however, were Calvinists who wanted to reform the Church of England, and did not want to separate from it. They also wanted to do what the Reformers were doing in terms of killing heretics (which is not authorized in the Bible). Puritans were also more inclined towards theology and learning, and believed in having a clergy.
 
Jun 10, 2019
4,304
1,653
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#17
I wonder if any of them who came to North America where truly practicing Christianity, maybe there’s somewhere in the New Testament about it’s ok to own someone else.
 

morefaithrequired

Well-known member
Sep 28, 2019
2,194
1,259
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#18
I just finished reading a book on the history of the early church...up to the time of abour 350 AD. Interestingly many elements of the reformation movements were exant in the very early church....and a big point of contention was authority. While some followers pursued relationship the dominant, and ultimately winning, side were those who emphasised religion over relationship.....religion with a very rigid structure.
Church Fathers?
 

calibob

Sinner saved by grace
May 29, 2018
8,268
5,463
113
Anaheim, Cali.
#19
Calibob, I found them on Wikipedia. They were called the Pilgrim Colony. You can read about them HERE
Wow that was a surprise. Thanks @Deade it was a trip over old US 99 lots of twists and turns like the grapevine used to be. Well here goes my brief synopsis;

The Puritans were Calvinists. They were fed up with both the RCC and the Anglican churches and Lutherans weren't much different. the Puritans were not much like the Calvinists of today. They were missionaries too. Trying to sepperate from the discrimination and hostilities of England and Europe plus the enticement of adventure and carrying the Gospel to a wild untamed people and land. It was enough to bring them to Plymouth and Pennsylvania/Dutch settlements in the new world. It's too bad about Jamestown. They all died from hostile aboriginal natives, starvation due to drought and unsanitary drinking water.

It seems like a strange twist the translation that most of them I've talked to is the one that was intended to change them into a more mainstream version of Christianity 400+ years ago, as well as they were trying, to some degree, to carry out the great commission.

Unfortunately they brought the same superstitions and paranoia with them that was contagious throughout Europe at the time including witch hysteria. Oh well, times have changed.
 

Deade

Called of God
Dec 17, 2017
16,135
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Vinita, Oklahoma, USA
yeshuaofisrael.org
#20
The Pilgrims were not the same as the Puritans (even though many confuse the two groups).

The Pilgrims were Separatists who did not want to be associated with the Church of England (which was under the British monarch). They wanted to worship in a more biblical manner and had no interest in reforming the Church of England. They were of a more humble station in life and were Congregationaiists.

Puritans, however, were Calvinists who wanted to reform the Church of England, and did not want to separate from it. They also wanted to do what the Reformers were doing in terms of killing heretics (which is not authorized in the Bible). Puritans were also more inclined towards theology and learning, and believed in having a clergy.
Yes but they spun off the Puritans and founded Plymouth Colony after coming over on the Mayflower. Here is the first paragraph in that Wikipedia article:

The Pilgrims or Pilgrim Fathers were the English settlers who established the Plymouth Colony in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Their leadership came from the religious congregations of Brownists, or Separatist Puritans, who had fled religious persecution in England for the tolerance of 17th-century Holland in the Netherlands. They held Puritan Calvinist religious beliefs but, unlike most other Puritans, they maintained that their congregations should separate from the English state church.