True or False - "Another Jesus"?

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Moses_Young

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Well, for one thing the Sabbath doesn't appear abolished there. ;)
I thought verse 15 hearkened back to the Daniel prophecy concerning the siege of Jerusalem. And that rememberance foretelling in Matthew that like unto it in future. When the abominable, those who are enemies of God, seek to overcome His people and His church, as did the ancient Romans when they lay siege against Jerusalem.

Here are other more learned thoughts.
Barnes' Notes on the Bible
The abomination of desolation - This is a Hebrew expression, meaning an abominable or hateful destroyer. The Gentiles were all held in abomination by the Jews, Acts 10:28. The abomination of desolation means the Roman army, and is so explained by Luke 21:20. The Roman army is further called the "abomination" on account of the images of the emperor, and the eagles, carried in front of the legions, and regarded by the Romans with divine honors.
Spoken of by Daniel the prophet - Daniel 9:26-27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11, see the notes at those passages.

Standing in the holy place - Mark says, standing where it ought not," meaning the same thing. All Jerusalem was esteemed "holy," Matthew 4:5. The meaning of this is, when you see the Roman armies standing in the holy city or encamped around the temple, or the Roman ensigns or standards in the temple. Josephus relates that when the city was taken, the Romans brought their idols into the temple, and placed them over the eastern gate, and sacrificed to them there, "Jewish Wars," b. 6 chapter 6, section 1.

Whoso readeth ... - This seems to be a remark made by the evangelist to direct the attention of the reader particularly to the meaning of the prophecy by Daniel.
Don't both passages refer to the fulfillment of Daniel's prophecy - the destruction of Jerusalem? That happened almost 2000 years ago.
 
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Don't both passages refer to the fulfillment of Daniel's prophecy - the destruction of Jerusalem? That happened almost 2000 years ago.
Problem with us Westerners we think that scriptures can only be fulfilled once, when in God's economy is circular, so that what was once will be again, and those in the past are there for our future understanding and recognizing when the final fulfillment occurs.
 

TheDivineWatermark

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Well, for one thing the Sabbath doesn't appear abolished there. ;)
You may not recall my posts about Col2:16-17 [LIST of things incl'g "sabbaths"] "which ARE [present tense, plural] A SHADOW [singular] of the things coming [present tense, plural]"...; and Exodus 31:13,17's "It [the sabbath/seventh day] is A SIGN between Me and the children of Israel for ever"...; and...

the issues re: how in Luke 13:6 (for example), the "a fig tree" he had planted IN "his vineyard" are clearly distinct things; and that "the vineyard" accord'g to Isaiah 5:7 is said to be, "the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel..." … and that Matthew 24:32 (in the "far-future" aspects of the Olivet Discourse [i.e. in the 7-yr trib]) may factor into this equation... (I won't go into all that here)… But just to point out that I do not believe "the fig tree" is "Israel" itself, as some believe (though having some association, like in Lk13:6!)

I thought verse 15 hearkened back to the Daniel prophecy concerning the siege of Jerusalem. And that rememberance foretelling in Matthew that like unto it in future. When the abominable, those who are enemies of God, seek to overcome His people and His church, as did the ancient Romans when they lay siege against Jerusalem.

Here are other more learned thoughts.
Barnes' Notes on the Bible
The abomination of desolation - This is a Hebrew expression, meaning an abominable or hateful destroyer. The Gentiles were all held in abomination by the Jews, Acts 10:28. The abomination of desolation means the Roman army, and is so explained by Luke 21:20. The Roman army is further called the "abomination" on account of the images of the emperor, and the eagles, carried in front of the legions, and regarded by the Romans with divine honors.
Spoken of by Daniel the prophet - Daniel 9:26-27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11, see the notes at those passages.

Standing in the holy place - Mark says, standing where it ought not," meaning the same thing. All Jerusalem was esteemed "holy," Matthew 4:5. The meaning of this is, when you see the Roman armies standing in the holy city or encamped around the temple, or the Roman ensigns or standards in the temple. Josephus relates that when the city was taken, the Romans brought their idols into the temple, and placed them over the eastern gate, and sacrificed to them there, "Jewish Wars," b. 6 chapter 6, section 1.

Whoso readeth ... - This seems to be a remark made by the evangelist to direct the attention of the reader particularly to the meaning of the prophecy by Daniel.
I'll come back a bit later to address this part (as I have in past posts)... I need to take some time to get those assembled into something "readable" (in view of the "complaints" regarding my writing style... and it IS *MINE* lol--not sure I can change a whole lot instantly, hehe); Just basically wanted to mark this place so I can get back to it (I'd lost it earlier in the day and took me awhile to find it again! :D )

[back later tonight... probably much later]
 

Whispered

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You may not recall my posts about Col2:16-17 [LIST of things incl'g "sabbaths"] "which ARE [present tense, plural] A SHADOW [singular] of the things coming [present tense, plural]"...; and Exodus 31:13,17's "It [the sabbath/seventh day] is A SIGN between Me and the children of Israel for ever"...; and...

the issues re: how in Luke 13:6 (for example), the "a fig tree" he had planted IN "his vineyard" are clearly distinct things; and that "the vineyard" accord'g to Isaiah 5:7 is said to be, "the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel..." … and that Matthew 24:32 (in the "far-future" aspects of the Olivet Discourse [i.e. in the 7-yr trib]) may factor into this equation... (I won't go into all that here)… But just to point out that I do not believe "the fig tree" is "Israel" itself, as some believe (though having some association, like in Lk13:6!)



I'll come back a bit later to address this part (as I have in past posts)... I need to take some time to get those assembled into something "readable" (in view of the "complaints" regarding my writing style... and it IS *MINE* lol--not sure I can change a whole lot instantly, hehe); Just basically wanted to mark this place so I can get back to it (I'd lost it earlier in the day and took me awhile to find it again! :D )

[back later tonight... probably much later]
I recall it. I just disagree that the Sabbath is no longer applicable. It is not prosecuted as the Pharisee's did , which is what was condemned by Jesus and is why He worked on the Sabbath so as to illustrate that point.
The Law of Moses was nailed to the cross and was in essence fulfilled by that last sacrifice there for the sins of the whole world.
While the Law of God, which we're told was written in our hearts so we would not be separated from it, the laws and the prophets, are in effect and are grounded in Love.
Jesus was asked about the Law. And he answered with certain of the ten commands. Jesus was Lord of the Sabbath also. This doesn't mean the Sabbath was abolished when Jesus was born and died. If it did mean that then the Apostles who followed him all his ministry would not have continue to honor the Sabbath as Jesus intended after His ascension.
Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath meaning Jesus is God who appointed the Sabbath. And until Heaven and Earth pass away it remains as a command. As do the other nine commands. Which some have said are impossible to keep. Which is kind of scary while invoking the name of Jesus when one thinks it is impossible not to murder, lie, steal, honor their parents, etc... And one soul went so far as to claim not only they but no one they know is able to keep the first command. Have no other God's before me.

People have very strange ideas about how to live the faith. God made it very simple through Jesus coming forth so as to make it very clear.
 

TheDivineWatermark

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I recall it. I just disagree that the Sabbath is no longer applicable.
In view of what you have written here ^ , my memory was jogged that I had forgotten to mention (as I usually do mention) also Hebrews 4:9 "there remaineth a sabbatismos [G4520] for the people of God"

TheDivineWatermark said:
You may not recall my posts about Col2:16-17 [LIST of things incl'g "sabbaths"] "which ARE [present tense, plural] A SHADOW [singular] of the things coming [present tense, plural]"...;
So... I would just say, "applicable" in what way, and in what point-in-time (or spans of time); for, I do agree with those who point out Paul saying, in Romans 14:5, "For indeed one judges a day to be above another day, but one judges every day alike. Let each be fully assured in the own mind." ;) If "observing the Sabbath Day" were a law that "the Church which is His body" is to abide by, wouldn't this have been [one of the places] where Paul could have made a point to say so?? Yet, he doesn't.
 

FollowtheShepherd

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I agree, their faith and love grows, by nature then, they will be more obedient.
Indded, and it's a life long process IMO.

This is talking about being led to christ, entering the narrow gate, this was the purpose of the law, which i agree, i was led to christ a few decades ago.
praise and glory to God! May we walk in His ways!

The law of liberty is not the law of moses, Moses has no room for liberty it is absolute, do this or else
I think it is the law of God, in the times of Meses mediated through levites, now in modern time mediated through Jesus the high priest after the order of Melchizedek

IYes, if we love by nature, we will obey commands
I agree and I really like these verses on the topic:

1 John 4:19, “We love Him because He first loved us.”

1 John 5:2-3, " 2 By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and obey his commandments. 3 For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome.

Exodus 20:6, “But showing love to thousands who love Me by keeping My Laws.”

John 14:15, “If you love Me, keep My commandments.”
 
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Indded, and it's a life long process IMO.



praise and glory to God! May we walk in His ways!



I think it is the law of God, in the times of Meses mediated through levites, now in modern time mediated through Jesus the high priest after the order of Melchizedek



I agree and I really like these verses on the topic:

1 John 4:19, “We love Him because He first loved us.”

1 John 5:2-3, " 2 By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and obey his commandments. 3 For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome.

Exodus 20:6, “But showing love to thousands who love Me by keeping My Laws.”

John 14:15, “If you love Me, keep My commandments.”
Its not about keeping commands, its about love, producing the fruit of the spirit, against which there is no law

Remember, the law is not given to the righteous, but to the sinner,
 

Whispered

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In view of what you have written here ^ , my memory was jogged that I had forgotten to mention (as I usually do mention) also Hebrews 4:9 "there remaineth a sabbatismos [G4520] for the people of God"



So... I would just say, "applicable" in what way, and in what point-in-time (or spans of time); for, I do agree with those who point out Paul saying, in Romans 14:5, "For indeed one judges a day to be above another day, but one judges every day alike. Let each be fully assured in the own mind." ;) If "observing the Sabbath Day" were a law that "the Church which is His body" is to abide by, wouldn't this have been [one of the places] where Paul could have made a point to say so?? Yet, he doesn't.
Actually, I think if the Saint Apostle Paul was at all referring to the Sabbath there he would have said so. Paul did not revoke nor deny Sabbath as The Book of the Acts of the Apostles chapter 17 tells us. Look at verse 2.
Paul observed the Sabbath.
The Book of the Acts of the Apostles chapter 13 speaks of this. And verse 44 speaks to Paul and Barnabas wherein the entire city came to hear the Good News on Sabbath day.
In fact in Paul's letter to the faithful in Colosse, Colossians chapter 2 and particularly verses 16 and 17, Paul tells the faithful there not be concerned for people's judgment of their faith filled practices. Including the Sabbath.
If Paul had intended to ever say Sabbath was no longer relevant he would not have consoled the faithful in that letter to not worry about their being judged for observing Sabbath.
Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holy day, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: 17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.


And to add, one can say that the Sabbath day is in the commandments from God. While least we forget we were told the Sabbath was made for us. The Book of Mark chapter 2.
Why would it seem reasonable that our Father would remove a day He made for us after He sacrificed Himself for our eternal salvation as a matter of His free gift of grace?
"I saved you from your sins but you're now no longer to have the Sabbath day I made for you."
Does that make sense? I don't feel it does.
 

FollowtheShepherd

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Its not about keeping commands, its about love, producing the fruit of the spirit, against which there is no law

Remember, the law is not given to the righteous, but to the sinner,
I believe this

"by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments" "

"Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar"

"I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard"

1 John 2:3-7, " 3 And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments. 4 Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, 5 but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: 6 whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked. 7 Beloved, I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard.

Psalms 19:7-11, " 7 The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul; the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple; 8 the precepts of the LORD are right, rejoicing the heart; the commandment of the LORD is pure, enlightening the eyes; 9 the fear of the LORD is clean, enduring forever; the rules of the LORD are true, and righteous altogether. 10 More to be desired are they than gold, even much fine gold; sweeter also than honey and drippings of the honeycomb. 11 Moreover, by them is your servant warned; in keeping them there is great reward.
 

FollowtheShepherd

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I believe this

"by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments" "

"Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar"

"I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard"

1 John 2:3-7, " 3 And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments. 4 Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, 5 but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: 6 whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked. 7 Beloved, I am writing you no new commandment, but an old commandment that you had from the beginning. The old commandment is the word that you have heard.

Psalms 19:7-11, " 7 The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul; the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple; 8 the precepts of the LORD are right, rejoicing the heart; the commandment of the LORD is pure, enlightening the eyes; 9 the fear of the LORD is clean, enduring forever; the rules of the LORD are true, and righteous altogether. 10 More to be desired are they than gold, even much fine gold; sweeter also than honey and drippings of the honeycomb. 11 Moreover, by them is your servant warned; in keeping them there is great reward.
Meant to post this tii :

1 John 5:2-3, " 2 By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and obey his commandments. 3 For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome."
 

TheDivineWatermark

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In fact in Paul's letter to the faithful in Colosse, Colossians chapter 2 and particularly verses 16 and 17, Paul tells the faithful there not be concerned for people's judgment of their faith filled practices. Including the Sabbath.
If Paul had intended to ever say Sabbath was no longer relevant he would not have consoled the faithful in that letter to not worry about their being judged for observing Sabbath.
Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holy day, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: 17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.
I disagree this is Paul's point, but rather, don't concern yourselves with those who would judge you REGARDING [this list]... but not saying "because you ARE OBSERVING [the list]" ;)



Exodus 31:14 [in view of vv.13 and 17 that I pointed out in my prior post, re: "A SIGN" btw Him and the children of Israel for ever] -

Ye shall keep the sabbath therefore; for it is holy unto you: every one that defileth it shall surely be put to death: for whosoever doeth any work therein, that soul shall be cut off from among his people.


Exodus 31:15 -

Six days may work be done; but in the seventh is the sabbath of rest, holy to the Lord: whosoever doeth any work in the sabbath day, he shall surely be put to death.


Exodus 35:2 -

Six days shall work be done, but on the seventh day there shall be to you an holy day, a sabbath of rest to the Lord: whosoever doeth work therein shall be put to death.




I believe Colossians 2:16-17 is very often misunderstood, as to the point Paul is actually conveying there.
 

Whispered

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I disagree this is Paul's point, but rather, don't concern yourselves with those who would judge you REGARDING [this list]... but not saying "because you ARE OBSERVING [the list]" ;)
I've removed the last of your remarks because those scripture points were seemingly meant to support your statement here. That is what I wish to address if you don't mind. :)
Even if you do....:p;)
Maybe we can ask ourselves , if Paul said, don't concern yourselves with those who would judge you regarding this, is an indication that those to whom he addressed his advice were observing that list of things Paul told them to not be concerned about the judgment thereof.
Why would Paul advise a people to be unconcerned about judgment if the people to whom he offered this advice were not doing something that would possibly garner judgment from others?
 

TheDivineWatermark

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Maybe we can ask ourselves , if Paul said, don't concern yourselves with those who would judge you regarding this, is an indication that those to whom he addressed his advice were observing that list of things Paul told them to not be concerned about the judgment thereof.
Would you mind re-phrasing the above ^ (bold), as I am not grasping the full thought you are endeavoring to communicate there ^ (my apologies).

I think I am getting what you are saying OVERALL, but am unsure of what the complete thought is, in the above (if that makes sense. Almost like I am reading an incomplete sentence... Plz, no offense intended, I just want to be sure what you are saying, especially as in relation to the below-quoted part). Thx! :)

Why would Paul advise a people to be unconcerned about judgment if the people to whom he offered this advice were not doing something that would possibly garner judgment from others?
"not observing [the things listed]" could indeed garner judgment (from others...in that setting/era/context)
 

Whispered

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Would you mind re-phrasing the above ^ (bold), as I am not grasping the full thought you are endeavoring to communicate there ^ (my apologies).

I think I am getting what you are saying OVERALL, but am unsure of what the complete thought is, in the above (if that makes sense. Almost like I am reading an incomplete sentence... Plz, no offense intended, I just want to be sure what you are saying, especially as in relation to the below-quoted part). Thx! :)



"not observing [the things listed]" could indeed garner judgment (from others...in that setting/era/context)
Yes, I realize my wording may have been confusing. I would do myself a favor by sharing this which I found hoping to locate a more learned resource than my meager effort to explain Paul's letter would afford.
I hope this helps. I'll post it under this response as a reply to it so as to give the article proper space to be read in full.
Let me know what you think if you do choose to read it.
 

Whispered

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Yes, I realize my wording may have been confusing. I would do myself a favor by sharing this which I found hoping to locate a more learned resource than my meager effort to explain Paul's letter would afford.
I hope this helps. I'll post it under this response as a reply to it so as to give the article proper space to be read in full.
Let me know what you think if you do choose to read it.
I used certain words in the search criteria to arrive at this resource:
https://www.ucg.org/the-good-news/the-sabbath-in-acts-lukes-record-of-pauls-understanding
The Sabbath in Acts
Luke's Record of Paul's Understanding

Posted on Dec 2, 1997 by Kevin Epps Estimated reading time: 12 minutes

Luke had been a companion of Paul. He would have understood the apostle's teaching concerning the Sabbath. What does his written record show?



One day while cleaning out old boxes in a closet, I came across a tan-brown book with pictures of seashells on it. Immediately I thought: What is this? It looks familiar. Probably something else I can throw away.

While thumbing through pages and pages of empty horizontal lines, I remembered that this was my one-time attempt to maintain a weekly journal. This noble effort had lasted only a few days.

Perhaps you don’t realize it, but you may have in your possession a copy of someone else’s journal written some 2,000 years ago. The author sustained this journal project for many years in a book that spans some three decades. Later his work came to be known as the Acts of the Apostles, an official Church history included in the Bible.

This particular book of journal entries begins shortly after the resurrection of Jesus Christ and ends with the apostle Paul’s first imprisonment in Rome. This biblical journal is called Acts because it is a record of the acts of the apostles as they carried out Jesus’ command to preach the gospel to all nations.

The record-keeper was a physician named Luke who accompanied the apostle Paul on his journeys. Line by line, Luke compiled much of Acts while Paul was experiencing the triumphs and trials of preaching the gospel, the good news, of the Kingdom of God.

Sprinkled throughout Luke’s journal are examples of Jewish and gentile Christians participating in a form of worship that many no longer associate with traditional Christianity. This often-overlooked Christian practice is called Sabbath -keeping. Keep in mind as we review Luke’s writing that he was a gentile (Colossians 4:10-11, 14), and Paul, though a Jew, was the apostle to the gentiles (Romans 11:13).

Ironically, many think that Paul’s writings reject Sabbath observance as a Christian practice. Did Paul uphold the Sabbath throughout the book of Acts but reject it in the books he wrote? Reading the epistles of Paul through the lens of the historical record of Acts can open new horizons of understanding. Let’s consider certain passages in Galatians, Romans and Colossians in the light of Luke’s perspective.
Days, months, seasons and years

Let’s begin our examination of this aspect of the history of the early Church in the book of Galatians, usually recognized as Paul’s first epistle. Here many people assume that Paul is chastising the Galatians for Sabbath-keeping: “… How is it that you turn again to the weak and beggarly elements, to which you desire again to be in bondage? You observe days and months and seasons and years ” (Galatians 4:9-10, emphasis added throughout).

But is Paul criticizing Sabbath observance here?

Actually, Paul visited several cities within the region of Galatia (in what is today central Turkey) during his first journey. He wrote this epistle as a follow-up to that journey. Notice what Luke records in Acts 13 concerning this visit:

  • Paul participates in Sabbath services at the local synagogue (verse 14).
  • He notes the practice of reading the Scriptures “every Sabbath” (verse 27).
  • Many gentiles beg Paul to preach to them “the next Sabbath” (verse 42).
  • “On the next Sabbath almost the whole city came together to hear the word of God” from Paul and Barnabas (verse 44).
If one assumes that Galatians 4:9-10 condemns Sabbath-keeping, we must ask why Paul would respect Sabbath-keeping while visiting the Galatian churches, yet, after departing, write a letter reprimanding them for observing these same days? Was Paul hypocritical? Did he change his mind? Was he confused?
The situation in Galatia

A closer look at the context, especially the verses preceding Galatians 4:9-10, will show that Paul was not addressing Sabbath- keeping at all. Many members of these churches had previously been engaged in religions that involved the worship of many false gods. Paul reminded them, “… When you did not know God, you served those which by nature are not gods” (verse 8). They were instructed not to “turn again” to their idolatrous practices of the past (verse 9).

Therefore, since Sabbath observance was not part of these idolatrous practices, Paul could not have been referring to Sabbath observance here. After all, one cannot turn again to that which he has never observed.

Galatia was part of the Roman Empire, in which observances and practices honoring pagan gods were attached to virtually every day, season, month and year. For instance, the first day of the week was devoted to the sun god. The first month of the year was devoted to Janus, the god of beginnings, from which January is named.

The spring season was devoted to the goddess Cybele and her male partner, Attis, in honor of whom a joyous spring resurrection festival was celebrated. The “days and seasons and months and years” pinpoint idolatrous practices the Galatians had observed when they “did not know God.” Paul is not criticizing them for Sabbath-keeping or observing biblical festivals.

On the contrary, we learn from Acts 13 that the Sabbath was a powerful tool used by God to bring gentiles into the truth of the Bible. Verse 43 notes that Paul was followed by Jews and “God-fearing proselytes” (New American Standard Bible).

These devout “God-fearers” were gentiles who had not fully converted to Judaism. Paul preached the gospel “among those Gentiles who, sabbath by sabbath , went out to the Jewish synagogue … They did not accept circumcision and the obligation to keep the whole Jewish law … Some of them kept the Sabbath as a day of rest and observed the Jewish food laws. They were known as ‘God-fearers’ “.(F.F. Bruce, The Spreading Flame , Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 1953, pp. 93-94, emphasis added). Sabbath-keeping was common among the “God-fearers,” many of whom became the nucleus of the gentile churches.
 

Whispered

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Can you create your own Sabbath?

The book of Romans is often mentioned in discussing the role of the Sabbath in the early Church. Romans 14:5-6 states: “One person esteems one day above another; another esteems every day alike. Let each be fully convinced in his own mind. He who observes the day, observes it to the Lord; and he who does not observe the day, to the Lord he does not observe it…”

At first glance this passage appears to say that observing the Sabbath, or any day of the week, simply doesn’t matter.

Most scholars agree that Paul wrote the book of Romans while visiting the Greek city of Corinth. Does Acts shed any light on Paul’s thinking while he was in Corinth?

Luke’s journal shows us that Paul, while in Corinth, “reasoned in the synagogue every Sabbath , and persuaded both Jews and Greeks” (Acts 18:1, 4). It is within the context of these actions that Paul wrote the book of Romans. As the book of Acts shows, regardless of what city Paul was in, Sabbath-keeping was his manner, habit or “custom” according to God’s commandments (Acts 17:2).

The congregation in Rome included a mix of Jews and gentiles (Romans 1:14; 2:17). Romans 14 deals with food-related circumstances with which Christians were confronted. Personal eating and fasting practices that were not addressed in the Scriptures became a point of contention. For instance, Jews came from a religious background in which some chose to fast “twice a week” (Luke 18:12). Typically, one would not fast on the Sabbath because this was a weekly feast, not fast, day.

Romans 14 also discusses vegetarianism (verses 2-3), which had no biblical connection with Sabbath observance. Verses 5 and 6 are variously interpreted as referring to fasting, as was the Jewish custom, or avoiding meats on some days, as was the custom of some from a gentile, Roman background.

However, the Sabbath is not even mentioned in these verses, nor, for that matter, anywhere in this entire epistle. New Testament writers did not ambiguously cloak the Sabbath in phrases such as “one day.”

Paul explains that the issue involved observing “the day” in relation to one’s eating habits (verse 6). Those who fasted or abstained from meats on particular days of the week gave thanks to God on those days, and those who ate every day of the week similarly thanked God for their daily bread. Romans 14:5-6 was not written to address Sabbath-keeping at all.
‘Therefore let us keep the feast’

The book of Acts also discusses other aspects of Paul’s Sabbath-keeping behavior while visiting Ephesus, a gentile city in Asia Minor. He told the Ephesian church, “I must by all means keep this coming feast in Jerusalem; but I will return again to you, God willing” (Acts 18:21).

The Sabbath was a weekly feast, but God also commanded annual feasts-the “holy convocations” recorded in Leviticus 23 and mentioned throughout the Bible.

The Ephesian church was so well acquainted with these annual Sabbaths (feasts, or festivals) that Paul didn’t even need to name which one he referred to. Though feast days were also kept outside of Jerusalem, Paul stated that he needed to keep this one in Jerusalem.

Later, after returning to Ephesus, Paul wrote to the primarily gentile church at Corinth, telling the brethren there: “Therefore let us keep the feast …” (1 Corinthians 5:8). His comments make it clear that he is referring to the Feast of Unleavened Bread, described in Leviticus 23:6-8. As with the Galatians, the Corinthians had at one time been steeped in paganism (1 Corinthians 12:2). Now God’s Sabbath, feasts and law were part of their new form of worship.

Paul’s visit to Philippi, another gentile city, is recorded in Acts 20. Luke notes that Paul and his companions, including Luke, “sailed away from Philippi after the Days of Unleavened Bread” (verse 6). If these feast days had not been observed outside of Jerusalem, there would have been no need to wait for the completion of this feast while in Philippi.

After visiting several other cities over subsequent weeks, Paul “decided to sail past Ephesus … for he was hurrying to be at Jerusalem, if possible, on the Day of Pentecost” (verse 16). Because of frequent travel while visiting the congregations of Greece and Asia Minor, Paul, as we see in Acts, decides not whether but where to keep the feasts of God.
Let no one judge you?

Paul was under house arrest “in chains” in Rome after his third journey when he wrote to the Colossians (Colossians 4:3). While sailing to Rome, he warned others on the boat against sailing this late in the year, since “the Fast was already over” (Acts 27:9). The “Fast” was a term for the Day of Atonement, another of the annual sabbaths appointed by God, which was observed by fasting, rest and worship (Leviticus 23:26-32).

Yet some conclude that, after this voyage, Paul rejected Sabbath and festival observances in his letter to the Colossians when he stated, “So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come …” (Colossians 2:16-17).

Is it Paul’s intention here to denigrate observing God’s festivals and sabbaths? Many think so while failing to recognize that, if this statement rejects the Sabbaths, then it also rejects eating and drinking, mentioned here in the same context.

Understanding the historical background helps us grasp Paul’s intent. This book was written to the “saints and faithful brethren in Christ who are in Colosse” (Colossians 1:2) to combat heresy that was creeping into the church. Promoters of this heresy took an ascetic approach, criticizing and condemning anything pleasurable.

Their extremism was reflected in their criticism of the Colossian members who enjoyed the Sabbaths and festivals in the festive, joyous spirit God intended (Deuteronomy 16:11, 14-15). Paul told the Colossians not to let others judge them in “food and drink” -literally “eating and drinking” on these days-which ran counter to the self-denial and asceticism advocated by these heretical teachers.

Such practices, Paul said, were “according to the tradition of men … and not according to Christ” (Colossians 2:8). The phrase “tradition of men” is used only in Colossians 2:8 and Mark 7:8. Many years earlier Christ had told the Pharisees: “For laying aside the commandment of God, you hold the tradition of men … All too well you reject the commandment of God, that you may keep your tradition” (Mark 7:8-9). Now it was Paul’s turn to confront those who imposed their man-made traditions as though they were “commandments of God.”

The Colossian heresy also involved the “worship of angels” (Colossians 2:18) according to the “commandments and doctrines of men,” including “self-imposed religion, false humility, and neglect of the body” (verses 22-23). The New Testament History describes this group as an “angel-cult of nonconformist Jewish foundation and pagan superstructure” (F.F. Bruce, Doubleday-Galilee, New York, 1980, pp. 415-416).

God forbids worship of angels or veneration of anything or anyone other than Him (Exodus 20:3-6). Church doctrines are to be established by the commandments of God, not “the tradition of men.” The feast days are a shadow of wonderful things to come, not just earlier historical events, as some suppose.

When we come to fully understand the meaning of these days, we recognize that they portray what God has done, is doing and ultimately will do for all mankind. We see, then, that Paul’s instruction in Colossians 2:16-17 was that members of God’s Church should not allow others to judge them in these areas.
The Sabbath was made for you

Even the few completed pages of my journal contained details I had forgotten concerning what was going on in my mind and life at the time I penned those pages. Likewise, Luke’s journal contains many reminders of the actions of Christians during the first 30 years of the Church.

God established His Church when He poured out His Spirit on Christ’s followers who were observing the Day of Pentecost as recorded in Acts 2. Throughout the ensuing years of the Church as recorded in Luke’s journal, with its share of ups and downs, we see that one thing remained constant: observance of God’s weekly Sabbaths and annual festivals.

God has graciously shared Luke’s journal with all who are willing to read it. This journal should never be forgotten, nor should the lessons it contains be disregarded. Acts confirms the words of Jesus Christ: “The Sabbath was made for man …” (Mark 2:27). It truly records the acts of the apostles-as they observed God’s Sabbaths and festivals. GN
 

DeighAnn

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It all comes down to God is Just.

Rightly divide the word of God, and there is not one contradiction. Ever wonder if the "right" books were put into the Bible. Certainly should settle the "did God really write it" debate.

If God is Just, then all is fair, and there is a reason for everything, and all we be right, if you know and understand just this

2 Peter 3:5 For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water

2 Peter 3:6 Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished

2 Peter 3:7 But the heavens and the earth, which are now by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men

You just have to rightly divide from there.

 

TheDivineWatermark

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'Therefore let us keep the feast'
Concerning 1 Corinthians 5 -

"7 Cleanse out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, as you are, unleavened. For also Christ our Passover lamb has been sacrificed, 8 so that we might celebrate the feast [G1858 - heortazōmen; subjunctive], not with old leaven, not with leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and of truth."

--Where it says, "so that we might celebrate the feast [G1858 - heortazōmen] [...WITH...]"... I don't believe is saying that this is the same thing as "you must keep the feast of unleavened bread [/Passover]" but that "YE ARE UNLEAVENED" (YOU! ... ARE!... that ye [plural] may be a new lump, AS YOU ARE UNLEAVENED! [where might you suggest Paul says ANYWHERE ELSE that "YE ARE ____" [<--fill in the blank with any other feast/festival/sabbath/new-moon/etc], addressed to "the Church which is His body" as this passage is)... The context is concerning...


[quoting] "Leaven is seen here once more as a type of evil. A little leaven, a little evil allowed, leavens the whole lump both individually and collectively. The Apostle demands that no evil in any form, whether moral or doctrinal, is to be tolerated among those who are Christ’s. Christ is our passover Lamb sacrificed for us. In Him all believers are constituted holy. With the passover there was inseparably linked the feast of unleavened bread, showing that redemption is holiness. As the Jew had to put away all leaven in eating the passover, so the Christian must purge out all leaven and be in an unleavened condition, in sincerity and in truth before God. Even the smallest bit of leaven, the least deviation from the truth of God, in holding some unscriptural doctrine, or any other evil, will, if not purged, ultimately leaven the whole lump. Christendom today is a solemn witness to this truth. The whole professing church is leavened by the leaven of the Pharisees (Ritualism); the leaven of the Sadducees (Higher Criticism or infidelity); the Corinthian leaven (vain glory and worldliness) and the Galatian leaven (Legalism). Then follows the command, “therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.” Such discipline demanded by the Holy Spirit is almost unknown today in that which professes to be the church of God." [--Gaebelein; end quoting; bold and underline mine]

...church discipline.
 

TheDivineWatermark

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^ IOW, I am not convinced that the phrase (and context) of "let us keep the feast" can be used as a command that all who ever become a member of "the Church which is His body" MUST observe, as a "law" (i.e. "The Law as a rule of life")


If we want to look at Leviticus 23, we should take note that verse 2 states, "Say unto the children of Israel... the feasts of the Lord, which YE SHALL PROCLAIM..."


["the Church which is His body" "PROCLAIMS" something in particular--1Cor11:26..."UNTIL"]
 

TheDivineWatermark

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(Colossians 2:16-17).
Is it Paul’s intention here to denigrate observing God’s festivals and sabbaths? Many think so while failing to recognize that, if this statement rejects the Sabbaths, then it also rejects eating and drinking, mentioned here in the same context.

Understanding the historical background helps us grasp Paul’s intent. This book was written to the “saints and faithful brethren in Christ who are in Colosse” (Colossians 1:2) to combat heresy that was creeping into the church. Promoters of this heresy took an ascetic approach, criticizing and condemning anything pleasurable.
Their extremism was reflected in their criticism of the Colossian members who enjoyed the Sabbaths and festivals in the festive, joyous spirit God intended (Deuteronomy 16:11, 14-15). Paul told the Colossians not to let others judge them in “food and drink” -literally “eating and drinking” on these days-which ran counter to the self-denial and asceticism advocated by these heretical teachers.

Such practices, Paul said, were “according to the tradition of men … and not according to Christ” (Colossians 2:8).
Colossians 2:16's usage of "G1035 - brosei ["food" singular, noun]" and "G4213 - posei ["drink" singular, noun]" ( https://biblehub.com/text/colossians/2-16.htm ) reminds me of the following (instead of the above-quoted explanation):


Hebrews 9:10 ( https://biblehub.com/text/hebrews/9-10.htm ) -

"8 the Holy Spirit this evidencing that not yet hath been manifested the way of the holy [places], the first tabernacle [the tabernacle in the wilderness, per vv.1-4 (as evidenced by the "golden pot of manna" and "Aaron's rod that budded")] having yet a standing; 9 which [is] a simile [/parable] in regard to the present time, in which both gifts and sacrifices are offered, which are not able, in regard to conscience, to make perfect him who is serving, 10 only in victuals [/foods/meats - G1033 - bromasin, plural noun], and drinks [G4188 - pomasin, plural noun], and different baptisms, and fleshly ordinances — till the time of reformation imposed upon [them]."



So, no... the above-quoted explanation remains unconvincing to me. :)