Does Ilhan Omar's "anti-Semitism" pose a grave danger to Democrats?

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Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
675
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#1
Fox "news" famous for headlines as bogus/sensational as the National Enquirer states:

Doug Schoen: Omar's anti-Semitism poses grave danger to Dems' 2020 election chances

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/dou...es-grave-danger-to-dems-2020-election-chances.

While that might sound right - an older 2015 poll mentioned in the Guardian says "55% of Americans who voice an unfavorable opinion of Islam"

"a YouGov poll conducted earlier this year which found that 55% of surveyed Americans had an “unfavorable” opinion of Islam".

Source:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/dec/08/muslims-us-islam-islamophobia-data-polls.

That 55% of Americans is a mix according to the poll graph - so it's debatable how Omar would effect people in the middle/independent or generally vote for the dems.
 

Susanna

Senior Member
Jan 21, 2013
3,155
441
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#2
I think this will contribute in making the GOP get the president come 2020. The Democrats is severely lacking comprehension of the American society outside a few big cities and some coastal states. Maybe no surprise hence the fact they are heavily relying on people with no understanding of American politics and American values. It’s like I was to be a member of the Duma...
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
13,485
1,465
113
#3
Fox "news" famous for headlines as bogus/sensational as the National Enquirer states:

Doug Schoen: Omar's anti-Semitism poses grave danger to Dems' 2020 election chances

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/dou...es-grave-danger-to-dems-2020-election-chances.

While that might sound right - an older 2015 poll mentioned in the Guardian says "55% of Americans who voice an unfavorable opinion of Islam"

"a YouGov poll conducted earlier this year which found that 55% of surveyed Americans had an “unfavorable” opinion of Islam".

Source:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/dec/08/muslims-us-islam-islamophobia-data-polls.

That 55% of Americans is a mix according to the poll graph - so it's debatable how Omar would effect people in the middle/independent or generally vote for the dems.
Doesn't matter what people think of Islam, it's a matter of what liberal Jews think of what she is saying. And her big mouth flapping her true feelings has forced Dems to come out and say hate is a no,no. She will be watched more carefully but her true intent has already been revealed. She is for boycotting Israel and doesn't believe in a two state solution. She believes Israel is an apartheid state. She's blown every dog whistle possible saying Jews have hypnotized the world with money. Any Jew paying attention and seeing the Dems afraid to even name her,let alone censure her, would give second thought to who they are voting for. Even liberal Jews.
 

JosephsDreams

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
4,254
418
83
#4
This is the new normal. Won't make a difference to those who lean Democratic.
They are all of the same demonic spirit.
Insane world we are in. The days of Noah.
 

JosephsDreams

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
4,254
418
83
#5
The abortion issue is a spiritual one. It is actually a blood sacrifice to satan. Using our children.
The devil had been doing this for thousands of years.
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
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#6
It's almost like Omar and AOC are doing a reverse Trump - Trump slammed NATO, never criticized "Israel" presumably because of his Jewish son in law and backslidden daughter.
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
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#8

SpoonJuly

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2018
1,117
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#9
What people seem to not understand is that these two women are only expressing publicly what most Democrats believe but will not say because it jeopardizes their re-election.
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
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#10

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
675
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#12
... the link requires a person to register in order to read the article. :sneaky:

one might wonder what's in it for you???
Maybe you read too many WP articles - I accessed it ok with my web browser that has cookies blocked - this is the article:

Her initial remark that Republican attacks on her for criticizing Israel were “all about the Benjamins baby” did not strike me as anti-Semitic (unlike her 2012 tweet on how Israel “hypnotized” the world, which did). It read that way to others, though, which Omar stressed on Monday wasn’t her intention; she thanked “Jewish allies and colleagues who are educating me on the painful history of anti-Semitic tropes,” such as the notion of powerful Jews using money to get their way that some people thought her tweet played on. Omar did not actually call out Jews, only AIPAC — which does not define itself as a Jewish lobby — but her critics immediately translated it into “Jewish money.” AIPAC even went so far as to send an email Tuesday using Omar to raise money: The message said Omar suggested that the “U.S. government supports Israel only because of Jewish money,” and then proceeded to ask for money.

But the wider frenzy betrayed the cynical ways that charges of anti-Semitism and claims to be standing up for Israel are so often wielded by U.S. politicians — especially, but not exclusively, by Republicans. Israel, and by extension Israelis and American Jews, gets used as a wedge by pretty much anyone who chooses to pick up the cause in service of their own political agendas. The ironic result, for a fight about anti-Semitism, is that Jews are treated simply as a monolithic object, as a group that’s somehow different from other American ethnic or religious minorities.


Some of the loudest voices condemning Omar on Monday have espoused anti-Semitic imagery and stereotypes in the past themselves. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) called for the chamber to penalize Omar and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) for supporting the movement to boycott Israel over its treatment of Palestinians. But last October, he tweeted a nefarious-looking image of Jewish liberal billionaire George Soros, saying “we cannot allow” Soros and two other rich Jewish Democrats, Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg, to “BUY this election!” He deleted the tweet, but never apologized. President Trump, who said Tuesday that Omar should resign from Congress, ran his own ad in 2016 featuring a menacing Soros, along with Goldman Sachs chief executive Lloyd Blankfein and then-Federal Reserve chair Janet L. Yellen, also both Jewish. He told a gathering of Jewish Republicans in 2015 that “I don’t want your money, so therefore, you’re probably not going to support me,” and “you want to control your own politician.” As president, he told a room full of American Jews at the White House in December that Israel is “your country.” He has yet to apologize for any of that.

[The false comfort of Trump's condemnation of anti-Semitism]

To Trump and his allies, though, challenging Israel’s right-wing government is the real anti-Semitism. A slew of organizations, not all of them even run by Jews, push the idea that supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement is anti-Semitic — including AIPAC. Other parts of the pro-Israel lobby push the issue more aggressively, such as Stand With Us, which endorses the argument that BDS is linked to terrorism; Canary Mission, an anonymous blacklist site dedicated to smearing; the American Jewish Committee, which has criticized Tlaib for being Palestinian; and Christians United for Israel, which is a Zionist group founded on an inherently anti-Semitic theology.


That is the underbelly of legislation that Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) recently championed that would help states ban contracts with people or organizations who advocate boycotting Israel. Rubio claimed opponents of the bill were “anti-Israel” and that boycotts are “discriminatory” against it. Republicans weren’t the only supporters of the measure, either; Democrats voted for it in large numbers, too. And their leaders — such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.), who pushed Omar to apologize, or Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.) — have adopted the Israeli talking point that BDS is anti-Semitic.

This is exactly the problem.

Politicians claim to be speaking on behalf of Israelis because they get support from the Israeli right, led by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and its proxies in the United States. Netanyahu helped turn Israel into a wedge issue during the Obama administration, when he all but endorsed Mitt Romney for president and addressed Congress in direct opposition to Obama’s Iran deal. AIPAC, whose ostensible mission is to “strengthen, protect and promote the U.S.-Israel relationship in ways that enhance the security” of both nations, by definition makes Israel exceptional. Its lobbying has ensured that Israel receives more foreign aid than any other country and that it remains the strongest military power in the Middle East. But it does so by bolstering the lawmakers that toe that line and ruining the careers of those that don’t.

And by now, many in Washington have come to embrace a consensus that being a good American means supporting Israel — regardless of its human rights violations or democratic record.

Pretending that Israel is the major concern for all Jews — and that anyone who criticizes its policies is engaging in anti-Semitism — is itself a form of scapegoating, a classic anti-Semitic trope. By toeing the nationalist policies set by the Israeli right, American politicians indicate that your position on Israel defines who you are and, especially, what you think of Jews.

[How to tell when criticism of Israel is — and isn't — actually anti-Semitism]

That logic is now pitting support for Israel directly against free speech and the right to boycott in the United States. That is a very dangerous position for Israelis, and for American Jews.

I am an Israeli Jew. Yet I oppose all anti-BDS legislation, and I support nonviolent boycotts, pressure to divest and sanctions to push Israel to cease its regime of state violence and inequality against the Palestinian people. That does not make me anti-Israel, nor an anti-Semite. In fact, I believe that equality and human rights for Palestinians would safeguard the interests of actual real Israelis on the ground much better than current U.S. policy toward Israel’s occupation does. American lawmakers who try to punish other Americans for supporting a Palestinian-led resistance to Israeli oppression manage to scapegoat both Jews and Palestinians, who should not be told how to resist their own oppression. And the frequency with which Israel is coming up in domestic American politics in recent years — in large part thanks to the no-daylight alliance between the Trump and Netanyahu administrations — has made this border on fetishization of Israel.

Declaring that criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic wrongly — and falsely — assumes all Jews are the same. The Israeli government encourages this: It implicitly claims to speak for all Jews, and Netanyahu claims to be the authority on what is anti-Semitic. His cozying up to Hungary and Poland despite their Holocaust revisionism is just one example. Reality is different: A poll by the American Jewish Committee last year found that less than half of American Jews supported Trump’s decision to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem; other polls routinely find that American Jews rank Israel as less important to them than many other political issues. But the more Israel becomes a pawn in U.S. politics, the more elected officials will treat Jews as an object, rather than as individuals.

In the 1988 book “The Lobby,” Edward Tivnan wrote, “How successful and powerful can a lobby be before the backlash strikes? More to the point: How powerful can a Jewish lobby be before the anti-Semites come out of the woodwork?” There are anti-Semites out there. And monopolizing Israel’s image and using it as a cudgel, only seems to be encouraging them further.

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to Edward Tivnan's book. It was published in 1988, not 1987, and its title is "The Lobby," not "The Israel Lobby."
 

UnderGrace

Senior Member
May 8, 2016
7,735
4,203
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#13
It's almost like Omar and AOC are doing a reverse Trump - Trump slammed NATO, never criticized "Israel" presumably because of his Jewish son in law and backslidden daughter.
Exactly.......by jove I think he has got it...... all theatre.....gaslighting, false accusations, pretense, left versus right false dichotomy, shall I go on
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
675
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#14
What people seem to not understand is that these two women are only expressing publicly what most Democrats believe but will not say because it jeopardizes their re-election.

A new poll from the University of Maryland shows Americans are increasingly supportive of a one-state solution in Israel. NPR's Michel Martin interviews Professor Shibley Telhami about the findings.

Excerpt:

MARTIN: The U.S., especially under President Trump, considers Israel a close ally. And this has raised questions about whether the U.S. can be an impartial mediator. What did Americans say when you asked if the U.S. should lean more toward Israel or toward Palestinians?

TELHAMI: And this is also something I've been studying literally for 30 years. So we have a track record of looking at this. One thing has not changed in those 30 years is the strong majority of Americans always say they want the U.S. to lean toward neither side throughout. And now too we have still over 60 percent who say they want the U.S. to lean toward neither side.

What has changed is that, among Republicans, an outright majority - now 57 percent - say they want the U.S. to lean toward Israel directly. However, among Democrats, the overwhelming majority 82 percent want the U.S. to lean toward neither side.

Full story:

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/15/6771...upport-grows-for-one-state-solution-in-israel
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
675
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#15
Exactly.......by jove I think he has got it...... all theatre.....gaslighting, false accusations, pretense, left versus right false dichotomy, shall I go on[/QUOTE]

I was hoping you might BigSmile.gif
 

UnderGrace

Senior Member
May 8, 2016
7,735
4,203
113
#16
I doubt Israel will go for it.

A new poll from the University of Maryland shows Americans are increasingly supportive of a one-state solution in Israel. NPR's Michel Martin interviews Professor Shibley Telhami about the findings.

Excerpt:

MARTIN: The U.S., especially under President Trump, considers Israel a close ally. And this has raised questions about whether the U.S. can be an impartial mediator. What did Americans say when you asked if the U.S. should lean more toward Israel or toward Palestinians?

TELHAMI: And this is also something I've been studying literally for 30 years. So we have a track record of looking at this. One thing has not changed in those 30 years is the strong majority of Americans always say they want the U.S. to lean toward neither side throughout. And now too we have still over 60 percent who say they want the U.S. to lean toward neither side.

What has changed is that, among Republicans, an outright majority - now 57 percent - say they want the U.S. to lean toward Israel directly. However, among Democrats, the overwhelming majority 82 percent want the U.S. to lean toward neither side.

Full story:

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/15/6771...upport-grows-for-one-state-solution-in-israel
 

Locutus

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2017
5,928
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#17
WASHINGTON (JTA) — Israeli and American Jews disagree on much — settlements, religious pluralism, even the degree to which they are “family.”

And now you can add Donald Trump to the mix.

Twin polls of Israeli and American Jews published by the American Jewish Committee on Sunday uncovered divides on all these issues, but an especially stark one about perceptions of the American president.

Asked if they approved of Trump’s handling of the U.S.-Israel relationship, 57 percent of American Jews disapproved while 34 percent approved. Among Israeli respondents, the divide was 77 percent approved while 10 percent disapproved.

That gap extended to perhaps Trump’s best known Israel related policy, moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. American Jews were statistically evenly split, with 46 percent supporting and 47 percent opposing. Israeli Jews were overwhelmingly in favor, with 85 percent supporting and 7 percent opposing.

Full story:

https://www.jta.org/2018/06/10/politics/poll-shows-deep-divide-israeli-american-jews-trump