Evmur

Butcher's boy

This is not me but it might of have been. I am skilled tradesman since the days when meat was prepared from carcase to shop display. It was a great trade. I was a training specialist for the company I worked for.

In my last years I was so dissatisfied with meat arriving all boned and just needing slicing I packed up butchering and did odd jobs like cleaning and pot washing
Only had lamb once (far as I know), and not sure if it was properly prepared. Did not care for it, probably because am basically a steak and taters kinda guy.
 
Interesting insights into how the trade has changed. As with many things. The old way was probably more healthy. I miss the old High Streets, each with their selection of local trades.
Hee hee those old days were bad old days as far as health and hygiene was concerned, sometimes they carcasses came with 6 inches of hair on, had to scape them down. And the old trussing blocks were wood, we would be beating out the fat for trussing and the maggots used to spill out of the joints. And this was Britain's leading supermarket.

Mebbe those things were healthy ... we never had widespread food poisoning or pandemics in those days.

... but the fun has gone.
 
Only had lamb once (far as I know), and not sure if it was properly prepared. Did not care for it, probably because am basically a steak and taters kinda guy.
... nothing wrong with steak and tatties :)
 
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Lol. Maggots were a way of curing meat in olden times. Native Americans perfected jerky like that (is what I've been told anyway).
Still, does sound unappetizing....
Certain maggots were a Native American delicacy I believe.
 
It sounds worse than it was, trussing blocks were thick solid wooden affairs, basically half a tree trunk. They were jointed at the corners. The butcher would cut the fat from the side of beef and slice it thinly then beat it out to wrap around the beef joints for basting and also for decoration.

At the end of each session the block would be scraped and scrubbed with a wire brush so the surface was always clean. But with use the joints would come apart somewhat and inevitably fat would get beaten into the joints.

Certain soft cheeses from France almost always came with maggots, still do I bet. Cheeses like Brie and Camembert. And of course it is always fun to put blue vein cheeses under a microscope.
 

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