Five Foolish Virgins VS Five Wise Virgins

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Absolutely

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I think I know why you are confused. Barnes I think is trying to say that the ten virgins represent the church in the sense that he sees all Christians as being represented in these friends of the bridegrooom.

So it seems Barnes is stating that the ten virgins "doubtless represent the church" and then he turns around and states "These were probably female friends and relatives of the bridegroom, who went out to welcome him and his new companion to their home. These are the virgins mentioned in this parable "

So which is it? I think he meant by stating that they ten virgins represent the church not that they represent the Bride in the Jewish ceremony but that he sees that the church (each christian) is being compared to these friends of the Bridegroom in this parable and the lesson of being ready to go out when the Bridegroom comes.

Here is his commentary in it's entirety.

The meaning is, "When the Son of man returns to judgment, it will be as it was in the case of ten virgins in a marriage ceremony." The coming of Christ to receive his people to himself is often represented under the similitude of a marriage, the church being represented as his spouse or bride. The marriage relation is the most tender, firm, and endearing of any known on earth, and on this account it suitably represents the union of believers to Christ. See Matthew 9:15; John 3:29; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:9; Ephesians 5:25-32.

Ten virgins - These virgins, doubtless, represent the church - a name given to it because it is pure and holy. See 2 Corinthians 11:2; Lamentations 1:15; Lamentations 2:13.

Which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom - The "lamps" used on such occasions were rather "torches" or "flambeaux." They were made by winding rags around pieces of iron or earthenware, sometimes hollowed so as to contain oil, and fastened to handles of wood. These torches were dipped in oil, and gave a large light. Marriage "ceremonies" in the East were conducted with great pomp and solemnity. The ceremony of marriage was performed commonly in the open air, on the banks of a stream. Both the bridegroom and bride were attended by friends. They were escorted in a palanquin. carried by four or more persons. After the ceremony of marriage succeeded a feast of seven days if the bride was a virgin, or three days if she was a widow. This feast was celebrated in her father's house. At the end of that time the bridegroom conducted the bride with great pomp and splendor to his own home.

This was done in the evening, or at night, Jeremiah 7:34; Jeremiah 25:10; Jeremiah 33:11. Many friends and relations attended them; and besides those who went with them from the house of the bride, there was another company that came out from the house of the bridegroom to meet them and welcome them. These were probably female friends and relatives of the bridegroom, who went out to welcome him and his new companion to their home. These are the virgins mentioned in this parable. Not knowing precisely the time when the procession would come, they probably went out early, and waited until they should see indications of its approach. In the celebration of marriage in the East at the present day, many of the special customs of ancient times are observed. "At a Hindu marriage," says a modern missionary, "the procession of which I saw some years ago, the bridegroom came from a distance, and the bride lived at Serampore, to which place the bridegroom was to come by water. After waiting two or three hours, at length, near midnight, it was announced, in the very words of Scripture, 'Behold the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.' All the persons employed now lighted their lamps, and ran with them in their hands to fill up their stations in the procession. Some of them had lost their lights and were unprepared, but it was then too late to seek them, and the cavalcade moved forward to the house of the bride, at which place the company entered a large and splendidly illuminated area before the house, covered with an awning, where a great multitude of friends, dressed in their best apparel, were seated upon mats. The bridegroom was carried in the arms of a friend, and placed in a superb seat in the midst of the company, where he sat a short time, and then went into the house, the door of which was immediately shut and guarded by sepoys. I and others expostulated with the doorkeepers, but in vain. Never was I so struck with our Lord's beautiful parable as at this moment - 'And the door was shut.'"
One component left out.
" the groom tarried"
 

Absolutely

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It is not something to argue about. There is a lack of understanding about the differences between allegories and parables in biblical literature and so people sometimes make mistakes in trying to decode the details in a parable when the detail objects are not really the lesson. The lost sheep could have been a lost goat, a lost calf, a lost alpaca, the lesson would have been the same. When people go on an on about the nature of sheep they miss the point.

When people try to interpret a parable defining secret revelation to every object in the story it is like trying to explain a joke. You probably aren't getting the lesson if you are trying to find secret meaning in the shape of the lamps they ten virgins used.

Below is a good explanation about Parables in the bible and how they are explained to Bible School Students in every denomination. It is not something students argue about. There is much more to exegesis for a parable but I wont post that now.

The Good Samaritan is an example of a true parable. It is a story, pure and simple, with a beginning and an ending; it has something of a “plot.” Other such story parables include the Lost Sheep, the Prodigal Son, the Great Banquet, the Workers in the Vineyard, the Rich Man and Lazarus, and the Ten Virgins.

The Yeast in the Dough, on the other hand, is more of a similitude. What is said of the yeast, or the sower, or the mustard seed was always true of yeast, sowing, or mustard seeds. Such “parables” are more like illustrations taken from everyday life, which Jesus used to make a point. Beyond this, such sayings as “You are the salt of the earth” differ from both of these. These are sometimes called parabolic sayings, but in reality they are metaphors and similes. At times they seem to function in a way similar to the similitude, but their point — their reason for being spoken — is considerably different. It should be noted further that in some cases, especially that of the Wicked Tenants (Matt 21:33 – 44 // Mark 12:1–11 // Luke 20:9 – 18), a parable may approach something very close to allegory, where many of the details in a story are intended to represent something else (such as in Augustine’s misinterpretation of the Good Samaritan). But the parables are not allegories — even if at times they have what appear to us to be allegorical features. The reason we can be sure of this has to do with their differing functions.

Because the parables are not all of one kind, one cannot necessarily lay down rules that will cover them all. What we say here is intended for the parables proper, but much of what is said will cover the other types as well.

How the Parables Function The best clues as to what the parables are is to be found in their function. In contrast to most of the parabolic sayings, such as not reaping figs from thorn bushes (Luke 6:43), the story parables do not serve to illustrate Jesus’ prosaic teaching with word pictures. Nor are they told to serve as vehicles for revealing truth — although they end up clearly doing that.

Rather the story parables function as a striking way of calling forth a response on the part of the hearer. In a sense, the parable itself is the message. It is told to address and capture the hearers, to bring them up short about their own actions, or to cause them to respond in some way to Jesus and his ministry.

Indeed, this chapter is being rewritten shortly after watching Spielberg’s marvelous film presentation of Lincoln, whose own personal wit and story-telling had a similar effect on his hearers — love or hate. It is this “call for response” nature of the parable that causes our great dilemma in interpreting them. For in some ways to interpret a parable is to destroy what it was originally. It is like interpreting a joke.

The whole point of a joke and what makes it funny is that the hearer has immediacy with it as it is being told. It is funny to the hearer precisely because they get “caught,” as it were. How a joke ends is not what one instinctively expects from how it began. But it can only catch someone if they understand the points of reference in the joke. If you have to interpret the joke by explaining the points of reference, it no longer catches the hearer and therefore fails to capture the same quality of laughter. When the joke is interpreted, it can then be understood all right and may still be funny (at least one understands what one should have laughed at), but it ceases to have the same impact. Thus it no longer functions in the same way. So it is with the parables.

They were spoken, and we may assume that most of the hearers had an immediate identification with the points of reference that caused them to catch the point — or be caught by it. For us, however, the parables are in written form. We may or may not immediately catch the points of reference, and therefore they can never function for us in quite the same way they did for the first hearers. But by interpreting we usually are able to understand what they caught, or what we would have caught had we been there. And this is what we must do in our exegesis. The hermeneutical task lies beyond that: How do we recapture the punch of the parables in our own times and our own settings?

Fee, Gordon D.; Stuart, Douglas. How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth
Yes
One can mis interpret.
We all are aware of that.
 

Absolutely

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At the bema seat....it is NOT a salvation/ no salvation dynamic.

When a few disciples went in with Jesus, it was not implying the ones left behind were not disciples.

When 5 Virgins are shut out, it does not mean forever.

When the covenant Jews are cut off, it does not mean none of them come in LATER through Messiah.. ( rev 14)

Virgin is not a variable.
10 christians.
5 were low on oil then ran out.

They were nominal believers. Carnal and satisfied with their tiny light and oil.

Bottom line...they could not run with the committed and on fire christians.
They sputtered and pooped out.

Not a salvation dynamic.

In fact, they get martyred right away by the AC.
....
an innumerable number at the throne of God.
It says " they washed their DIRTY ROBES in the blood.

They were carnal nominal believers...NOT WORTHY.

Jesus said " but pray that you may be COUNTED WORTHY to escape and STAND BEFORE the son of God."

The 10 virgin/ 10 christian parable is a Worthy / unworthy. Dynamic.

As is the one Taken/ left.
All fact.
Thumbs down from scribe.

Ok got it.
 

Absolutely

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The wording of the five foolish virgins in our text is all too familiar to the reader of Matthew’s Gospel: Matthew 25:11 - "Later, the other virgins came too, saying, ‘Lord, lord! Let us in!’ 12 But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I do not know you!"

Matthew 7:21 - "Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter into the kingdom of heaven" but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven - (See John 6:40). 22 On that day, many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, didn’t we prophesy in your name, and in your name cast out demons and do many powerful works?’ 23 Then I will declare to them, 'I never knew you. Go away from me, you lawbreakers!’ (Matthew 7:21-23)

Taking Matthew’s words literally, I read that the difference between the foolish virgins and the wise virgins: The wise virgins had oil for their lamps, while the foolish virgins did not. The wise virgins had the opportunity to obtain oil, and did so. The foolish virgins had plenty of opportunity to procure oil, but did not. It's possible to be in close contact with Christ, and with Christians, and yet not be saved. I am reminded of a similar passage in the Gospel of Luke:

Luke 13:23 Someone asked him, "Lord, will only a few be saved?" So he said to them, 24 "Exert every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to. 25 Once the head of the house gets up and shuts the door, then you will stand outside and start to knock on the door and beg him, ‘Lord, let us in!’ But he will answer you, ‘I don’t know where you come from.’ 26 Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank in your presence, and you taught in our streets.’ 27 But he will reply, ‘I don’t know where you come from! Go away from me, all you evildoers!’ 28 There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves thrown out. 29 Then people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and take their places at the banquet table in the kingdom of God. 30 But indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last."

Jesus may indeed be warning us in this parable that there will be a number of people who look like Christians, who associate with Christians, and who even think they are Christians, who will be shocked to learn that they are not saved at the return of our Lord and Christ never knew them. What a sobering thought!
no matter what.
Virgin = pure, undefiled, born again blood washed believers.

If one tries to muddy that up then the entire parable can just recieve other abstract attributions.

It is not a "saved vs wicked" story.

It is a " worthy vs unworthy" story.

In a nutshell BELIEVERS warned to keep extra oil.
Filled with the spirit to overflowing.

Nominal carnal belivers are still saved.

Nobody is " kinda saved"
 

Absolutely

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The context states the reason he told them this parable "
15 Now the tax collectors and sinners were all gathering around to hear Jesus. 2 But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
3 Then Jesus told them this parable:..."

With that in mind one can understand that the lost sheep, the prodigal and other parables here are to teach them that God is all about saving sinners and publications and they should be glad if they really were on God's side instead of murmuring about it.
the story has at least 2 meanings.

If i begin from another position i miss the parable.

Think "sons"
"2 sons"
" father"

Audience is the Jews

But bible written to family.

Factor that in and other markers.

We can not ascribe abstracts.
 

Absolutely

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The wording of the five foolish virgins in our text is all too familiar to the reader of Matthew’s Gospel: Matthew 25:11 - "Later, the other virgins came too, saying, ‘Lord, lord! Let us in!’ 12 But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I do not know you!"

Matthew 7:21 - "Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter into the kingdom of heaven" but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven - (See John 6:40). 22 On that day, many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, didn’t we prophesy in your name, and in your name cast out demons and do many powerful works?’ 23 Then I will declare to them, 'I never knew you. Go away from me, you lawbreakers!’ (Matthew 7:21-23)

Taking Matthew’s words literally, I read that the difference between the foolish virgins and the wise virgins: The wise virgins had oil for their lamps, while the foolish virgins did not. The wise virgins had the opportunity to obtain oil, and did so. The foolish virgins had plenty of opportunity to procure oil, but did not. It's possible to be in close contact with Christ, and with Christians, and yet not be saved. I am reminded of a similar passage in the Gospel of Luke:

Luke 13:23 Someone asked him, "Lord, will only a few be saved?" So he said to them, 24 "Exert every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to. 25 Once the head of the house gets up and shuts the door, then you will stand outside and start to knock on the door and beg him, ‘Lord, let us in!’ But he will answer you, ‘I don’t know where you come from.’ 26 Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank in your presence, and you taught in our streets.’ 27 But he will reply, ‘I don’t know where you come from! Go away from me, all you evildoers!’ 28 There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves thrown out. 29 Then people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and take their places at the banquet table in the kingdom of God. 30 But indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last."

Jesus may indeed be warning us in this parable that there will be a number of people who look like Christians, who associate with Christians, and who even think they are Christians, who will be shocked to learn that they are not saved at the return of our Lord and Christ never knew them. What a sobering thought!
The parable of the wedding supper has one guy wandering around with no garment.

He becomes ashamed.

No hypocrites allowed.
God hates a hypocrite.

When he comes, we will either worship or repent.

The repenters are not going in the rapture.
 

Truth7t7

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Yes
All 10 are believers.
Your claim is false, the 5 foolish virgins were never saved and sealed by the Holy Spirit, (I Know You Not) saved believers are (Sealed) until the day of redemption, Eph 1:13, 4:30

Matthew 25:11-12KJV

11 Afterward came also the other virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.
12 But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not.
 

Truth7t7

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Those left behind are martyred.
They end up in heaven as the innumerable number with dirty robes being washed.
You now have Jesus Christ running a Laundromat, Does That Come With A Free Press Toooooo o_O
 

tribesman

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Your claim is false, the 5 foolish virgins were never saved and sealed by the Holy Spirit, (I Know You Not) saved believers are (Sealed) until the day of redemption, Eph 1:13, 4:30

Matthew 25:11-12KJV
11 Afterward came also the other virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.
12 But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not.
That's the Spirit!
 

Truth7t7

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the story has at least 2 meanings.

If i begin from another position i miss the parable.

Think "sons"
"2 sons"
" father"

Audience is the Jews

But bible written to family.

Factor that in and other markers.

We can not ascribe abstracts.
More claims in one liners, without scriptural support.
 
4

4ChristAlone

Guest
You are too busy arbitrarily "correcting".
Have you tried looking in a mirror?

The simon thingy is too simple to look so deeply into.
There are those who are without oil who desire it being told to go buy from them that sell (what it is they need). Proverbs 23:23 says, Buy the truth, and sell it not; Elsewhere in scripture it shows Judas (who was counted among the apostles) the son of perdition took a price (of money) for Jesus Christ (The Truth) selling out/betraying the Truth (reward of iniquity there). As it shows the offer to buy the Holy Spirit/of Tuth (or the oil in part of the parable) which Simon (also believer) who offers money to purchase the same (but from those who did not sell) who likewise was told he was in the bond of inquity. In every place where we see them call him "Lord Lord" (just as the foolish virgins did) they are believers (to whatever extent) but Jesus tells them he knows them not. Additionally elsewhere he tells those who name his name "I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity" (even as we are warned as believers that they who name his name depart from inquity in 2 Ti 2:19) unless we should hear "I never knew you: depart from me ye that work iniquity" Where there are examples (no matter how small or large) that follow in the same common theme between them.

It should be encouraged to investgate those things when you take to heart what Jesus said, "Take heed what ye hear: with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you: and unto you that hear shall more be given."

Maybe those future 5 foolish virgins also thought that simon thingy was too simple for them to look to deeply into?

When i mention " buy" and " sell" i am connecting it to those same items dynamics in rev. in the 7 letters.
You weren't really connecting anything because you don't show what you are respond to or what you are springboarding off of in the post you are actually responding to. Your response is often one line choppy bit sentences which rarely if ever include a verse of scripture. Unless this is by design?

The " buy" is not money and the "sell" is not a merchant.
Which is why I stated,

"The word "buy" is a verb, and "money" is a neuter noun just as "sell" is a verb and "merchant" is a masculine noun"

Regardless, changes nothing, the same words in the same verses I have already provided in my previous post are the same shown in parable of the virgins and are the same in Revelation.

Then when you said to me (for whatever reason you did)

Components of the parable are inseparable from the meaning For example, in the prodigal, there are 2 brothers. 2 are in the story for a reason
And so I basically invited you to feel free to enlighten me to God's reason, and your response to that is now

I do not think 10 ( the number itself) is significant.
I believe 50 % is.
It is the same percentage as " one taken" a few sentences before.

The message is 50 % went.
Are you serious?
 

throughfaith

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1¶O foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you, that ye should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evidently set forth, crucified among you?
2This only would I learn of you, Received ye the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?
3Are ye so foolish? having begun in the Spirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh?
4Have ye suffered so many things in vain? if it be yet in vain.
This verse is for those who apply this verse for the Church.
 

Absolutely

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Have you tried looking in a mirror?



There are those who are without oil who desire it being told to go buy from them that sell (what it is they need). Proverbs 23:23 says, Buy the truth, and sell it not; Elsewhere in scripture it shows Judas (who was counted among the apostles) the son of perdition took a price (of money) for Jesus Christ (The Truth) selling out/betraying the Truth (reward of iniquity there). As it shows the offer to buy the Holy Spirit/of Tuth (or the oil in part of the parable) which Simon (also believer) who offers money to purchase the same (but from those who did not sell) who likewise was told he was in the bond of inquity. In every place where we see them call him "Lord Lord" (just as the foolish virgins did) they are believers (to whatever extent) but Jesus tells them he knows them not. Additionally elsewhere he tells those who name his name "I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity" (even as we are warned as believers that they who name his name depart from inquity in 2 Ti 2:19) unless we should hear "I never knew you: depart from me ye that work iniquity" Where there are examples (no matter how small or large) that follow in the same common theme between them.

It should be encouraged to investgate those things when you take to heart what Jesus said, "Take heed what ye hear: with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you: and unto you that hear shall more be given."

Maybe those future 5 foolish virgins also thought that simon thingy was too simple for them to look to deeply into?



You weren't really connecting anything because you don't show what you are respond to or what you are springboarding off of in the post you are actually responding to. Your response is often one line choppy bit sentences which rarely if ever include a verse of scripture. Unless this is by design?



Which is why I stated,

"The word "buy" is a verb, and "money" is a neuter noun just as "sell" is a verb and "merchant" is a masculine noun"

Regardless, changes nothing, the same words in the same verses I have already provided in my previous post are the same shown in parable of the virgins and are the same in Revelation.

Then when you said to me (for whatever reason you did)



And so I basically invited you to feel free to enlighten me to God's reason, and your response to that is now



Are you serious?
Ok sorry about that.

Any one thing in particular ?

You seem pretty perturbed.
 

Absolutely

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...right at the appointed time.
You just brought up an interesting dynamic.

Had he not tarried, the foolish may have gotten in.

They had oil in the beginning

Hmmmmmm
 

Absolutely

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You now have Jesus Christ running a Laundromat, Does That Come With A Free Press Toooooo o_O
It is in rev.

Call it what you like

I am just a reporter.

Maybe Jesus made a mistake?