Numbers

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FollowtheShepherd

Well-known member
Sep 15, 2019
794
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63
#21
This shows the attributes and love of the Creator! He is amazing!

Numbers 14:17-21,

17 And now, please let the power of the Lord be great as you have promised, saying,

18 ‘The LORD is slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, forgiving iniquity and transgression, but he will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, to the third and the fourth generation.’

19 Please pardon the iniquity of this people, according to the greatness of your steadfast love, just as you have forgiven this people, from Egypt until now.”

20 Then the LORD said, “I have pardoned, according to your word. 21 But truly, as I live, and as all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the LORD,
 

CharliRenee

Member
Staff member
Nov 4, 2014
6,680
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#22
This shows the attributes and love of the Creator! He is amazing!

Numbers 14:17-21,

17 And now, please let the power of the Lord be great as you have promised, saying,

18 ‘The LORD is slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, forgiving iniquity and transgression, but he will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, to the third and the fourth generation.’

19 Please pardon the iniquity of this people, according to the greatness of your steadfast love, just as you have forgiven this people, from Egypt until now.”

20 Then the LORD said, “I have pardoned, according to your word. 21 But truly, as I live, and as all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the LORD,
Wow, His word truly never ceases to amaze me. We R all so blessed with Him, His Glory, His Love and mercy, and of course His word.
 

Heyjude

Active member
Sep 7, 2019
277
121
43
#23
I absolutely love that image, very helpful. Thank you.
That is a great image. There seems to be so much truth in the saying

"If a picture speaks a thousand words, then a symbol speaks a thousand pictures". This one surely does it rightly.
 
Mar 28, 2016
15,954
1,527
113
#24
I think so much of the clean and unclean animals represent our condition before and after Jesus, showing us the holiness of Christ and God. Honestly garee, I do not know for sure.

Thanks for saying we are on a learning curve. I see humility in that response, something I always see as a blessing.
Thanks for the reply.

I would agree the unclean would represent the unredeemed natural unconverted mankind . The lamb as a new creature the signified source of redeeming . Ultimately teaching us God is not served by human hand (false prophets) in any way shape or form .God moves men to do His will, not us Him . As always we can plant the seed and water it with the doctrines of God but if any growth the creature factor is removed.

God can as shown use a unbeliever typified by a donkey to perform his good works that he does work in us to both will and do His good pleasure . We can be as stubborn as a donkey like that of Jonas but in the end His will is done

Exodus 13:13 And every firstling of an ass thou shalt redeem with a lamb; and if thou wilt not redeem it, then thou shalt break his neck: and all the firstborn of man among thy children shalt thou redeem.

Again below a double blessing as another witness (two or three ) establishes it as a law not subject to change .Another parable that speaks of our redemption the gospel in respect to the suffering of Christ preached beforehand .

Exodus 34:20 But the firstling of an ass thou shalt redeem with a lamb: and if thou redeem him not, then shalt thou break his neck. All the firstborn of thy sons thou shalt redeem. And none shall appear before me empty.

Interestingly the second reasoning (Exodus 34) builds on the first(Exodus 13) and work both work as one together to help emphasize the nature of the eternal rest we do have. Like the the different reasons in the two rendering of the 10 commandmnets.

Exodus 20 like Exodus 34. And Deuteronomy 5 like Deuteronomy 5. Using both the seventh day and the departure of Egygt.

Exodus 34:21 King James Version (KJV)
Six days thou shalt work, but on the seventh day thou shalt rest: in earing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.

Exodus 13:14 King James Version (KJV) And it shall be when thy son asketh thee in time to come, saying, What is this? that thou shalt say unto him, By strength of hand the Lord brought us out from Egypt, from the house of bondage:


Ex.20: 11 For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

Deuteronomy 5: 15 And remember that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm: therefore the Lord thy God commanded thee to keep the sabbath day
 

TheDivineWatermark

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2018
9,406
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#25
I, too, like the picture Guojing posted in Post #15 (and I like the Book of Numbers too :) )… it is a very good depiction; I've posted before on the similarities between the description of the "4 living creatures" in Rev4 and this "4-directional plotment" of Israel in the OT:

[quoting those posts]

The "4 living creatures" (Rev4:6-7) I believe in some way represent the "four-directional plotment" of Israel, in the following ways:

Judah - "Lion" banner - east - (Numbers 2:3; Numbers 10:14-17; etc)

Reuben - "[face of a] man" banner - south - (Numbers 2:10; Numbers 10:18-21; Num32:29; 1Chron5:18;12:37; Josh4:12-14; etc)

Ephraim - "ox/calf [/bull/bullock]" banner - west - (Numbers 2:18; Numbers 10:22-24; Jer31:18[/Deut33:17]; etc)

Dan - "eagle flying" banner - north - (Numbers 2:25; Numbers 10:25-28; etc)

[and see also...]

⦁ the Levites "in the midst" - (Numbers 2:17,33; Numbers 3:3-20,39,41,45; 4:5,15a; etc)

In chpt 6, we see the "4 living creatures" saying [individually] "Come! [and see]" at the opening of each of the first FOUR "SEALS": Rev6:1,3,5,7 (which are parallel to "the beginning of birth PANGS [PLURAL]" of Matt24:4-8/Mk13:5-8/Lk21:8-11, with many MORE birth pangs that FOLLOW ON from there during the trib years).


I agree with much of what Gaebelein writes, here:

[quoting; bracketed comments mine]

"Revelation 6:9-11.

"The four living creatures have uttered their four-fold “Come.” They are thus seen in connection with the providential government of the world. [note: I've mentioned before that I believe "the 4 living creatures" in some way represent the "4-directional plotment" of Israel of OT times--these match their descriptions [<snip> ]]. Under the fifth seal the scene changes completely. John saw under the altar the souls of them that had been slain. And they cry, “How long, O Lord!” Who are they? Not the martyrs of past ages. They are risen from the dead and are in glory with redeemed bodies. [note: I disagree that any OT saints are "resurrected" by this point in the chronology, based on Dan12:13, etc; the Church which is His body has been, yes]. The words of the Lord in the Olivet discourse give us the key. Speaking to His Jewish disciples He said: “Then shall they deliver you up, and shall kill you and ye shall be hated of all nations for My Name’s sake” (Matthew 24:9). [agree with this]

"The Lord speaks of another company of Jewish disciples who will bear a witness during the end of the age, after the rapture of the Church. He will not leave Himself without a witness. He calls a remnant of His people Israel and they bear a witness to the coming of the Messiah, their coming Deliverer and King. Many of them suffer martyrdom. Their cry, “How long?” is the well-known prayer of Jewish saints; and their prayer to have their blood avenged is equally a Jewish prayer. Christians are not supplicating for vengeance on their foes. The prayer for vengeance refers us to the imprecatory psalms prewritten by the Holy Spirit in anticipation of the final persecution of Jewish believers. And the fellow-servants and their brethren, who are yet to be killed (Revelation 6:11), are the martyrs of that remnant during the final three and one-half years, which is the great tribulation."

--Gaebelein, Commentary on Revelation 6

[end quoting; bracketed comments mine, parenthesis original]

[end quoting]
 

TheDivineWatermark

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2018
9,406
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#26
The Hebrew title of Numbers is Bemidbar, which means "in the wilderness". That is found in the first verse of the first chapter, which literally reads as below:
And spoke Yahweh to Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tabernacle of meeting, on the first day of the second month, in the second year after they had come out of the land of Egypt, saying...
וַיְדַבֵּ֨ר יְהוָ֧ה אֶל־ מֹשֶׁ֛ה בְּמִדְבַּ֥ר סִינַ֖י בְּאֹ֣הֶל מֹועֵ֑ד בְּאֶחָד֩ לַחֹ֨דֶשׁ הַשֵּׁנִ֜י בַּשָּׁנָ֣ה הַשֵּׁנִ֗ית לְצֵאתָ֛ם מֵאֶ֥רֶץ מִצְרַ֖יִם לֵאמֹֽר׃
(to be read from right to left)

The King James Bible 2000 has rendered this closest to the Hebrew:
And the LORD spoke unto Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tabernacle of meeting, on the first day of the second month, in the second year after they were come out of the land of Egypt, saying,...
"In the wilderness" is an apt title for this book. While the census was important, what happened in the wilderness was even more important, and there are several significant incidents reported.
Maybe you can help me.

What I am seeing is, that "H4057 - midbar - wilderness" [verse 1] (used 48x in Numbers) is a different word from "H4557 - mispar - number" [verse 2] (used 34x in Numbers). Similar, yes, but not the same (it seems to me). Is this what you are seeing?

https://biblehub.com/hebrew/4557.htm
 

TheDivineWatermark

Well-known member
Aug 3, 2018
9,406
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#27
Maybe you can help me.
What I am seeing is, that "H4057 - midbar - wilderness" [verse 1] (used 48x in Numbers) is a different word from "H4557 - mispar - number" [verse 2] (used 34x in Numbers). Similar, yes, but not the same (it seems to me). Is this what you are seeing?
https://biblehub.com/hebrew/4557.htm
Okay, nevermind… I'm seeing now that in the "Orthodox Jewish Bible" ("OJB" version) that the title given it is as you say, "Bamidbar" (meaning, "in the wilderness" [that is, H4057]) :unsure:
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
20,926
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#28
Maybe you can help me. What I am seeing is, that "H4057 - midbar - wilderness" [verse 1] (used 48x in Numbers) is a different word from "H4557 - mispar - number" [verse 2] (used 34x in Numbers). Similar, yes, but not the same (it seems to me). Is this what you are seeing?
The only word that come close to mispar is לְמִשְׁפְּחֹתָ֖ם (lə-miš-pə-ḥō-ṯām) which means "by their families" (in the KJV "after their families).\

Also some are transliterating it as Bamidbar but previously (and even now) Bemidbar was being written.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
20,926
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#29
Our journey as Ambassadors for Christ sent form a foreign land, where Christian have there citizenship?
Yes. The application of "in the wilderness" for Christians would be exactly this. We are called strangers and pilgrims, and this world is clearly a wilderness compared to our heavenly home in the New Jerusalem. And our citizenship is indeed in Heaven.

Abraham is a type of the Christian, since he also looked for a city which has foundations, whose builder and maker is God. Meanwhile he lived in tents. And as one song says "We're just a passin' through".
 

Heyjude

Active member
Sep 7, 2019
277
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#30
Yeah, how can we not appreciate that? I agree.
Hey CharliRenee!

I love that story! The story of Balaam in Numbers is so interesting as the more you read it, the more questions you ask. I write down all my questions when I study but the list is too long on this story!

Not only the question of the donkey having perfect intelligent reasoning, indeed speaking at all, but that Balaam didn't question why he was talking back to his donkey in the first place?

This reminds me of the nonsensical reaction in the character in the Franz Kafka novel " The Metamorphosis”. The salesman Gregor Samsa wakes one morning to find himself inexplicably transformed into a huge insect. But Gregor then worries when he wakes up that he is not going to be able to go to work.

You would think Balaam's first response would be, "How come you speak being a donkey?"

"Then the LORD opened the mouth of the donkey, and she said to Balaam, “What have I done to you that you have struck me these three times?” Balaam answered the donkey, "You have made a fool of me! If I had a sword in my hand, I would kill you right now!" Numbers 22:31

Then Balaam changes in speech from being full of violence and rage to being passive and calm. One minute he is beating the donkey in a fury threatening to kill her, the next just passively saying "No" to the donkeys extremely patient and enlightened speech. A bit like a little kid might answer.

So the donkey said to Balaam, “Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden, ever since I became yours, to this day? Was I ever disposed to do this to you?

” And he said, “No.” (Num 2:30)

A change in mood from rage to reason?

He had not seen the Angel at that point or had his eyes opened.

The Angel would have killed Balaam if it hadn't been for the donkey and says as much, yet the Angel still let Balaam go on with his journey and instructs him he will be told what he will say..

Yet Balaams answer is still odd - almost like "well if you think it's evil, or course I won't go". (Like he didn't know by that point?). It seems only an evil can be stopped by fear in some. Only seeing the Angel with a sword drawn stopped Balaam yet still he acted oddly. He might as well have said, "oh well, if you say so; I don't have to go if you don't want me to go". This is really odd and not normal behaviour.

If most people saw an Angel about to kill them for disobeying God, you would think that would be enough! But it clearly wasn't enough (or he forgot) as it didn't stop him trying to harm Israel later either, even after the blessing and before he was slain. He surely knew the will of God by that point? This story continues to raise even more questions than it answers but I am sure we are supposed to pay attention to those red flags!

If the Angel was going to kill Balaam before the donkey stopped him doing so, why did God tell Balaam he could go, especially after he said no before?

The donkeys actions seem central to the story as they saved Baalam his life but did not change Balaam's way his way of thinking, as we find out later that after all this, he went back to his place, but still then helped trap the Israelites later in Numbers 25. For this God plagued them, and 24,000 men died. So he might not have been a false prophet but he was a wicked one.

Peter says Balaam“ loved the wages of wickedness” 2 Peter.2:15

It is also strange how later on after the two attempts to get Balaam to curse the Israelites that Balak insists upon he still keeps going. You would think by now after twice failing, he would have given up? The "Spirit of God" came upon him before he blesses Israel so poetically in the third attempt, which it had not happened the previous two attempts when "he went not, as at other times, to seek for enchantments".

Such a mysterious story. So much more to it than the question of whether Donkeys can talk or not. Did the donkey represented Balaam's enlightened intellect he was ignoring?

He couldn't have been that enlightened, as he later gets his reward from Balak after all. Balaam “error” again shown with him advising the Moabites on how to entice the people of Israel with prostitutes and idolatry after all. He must have forgotten about the Angel who was going to kill him or Gods Will? Yet how could he forget that?

Balaam was a strange character indeed. It was like he was two people.

One a wicked greedy sorcerer who loved gain, and the other one a prophet of God.

Whether he was a “false prophet” is unknown as I don't know if he said anything false or not, just wicked.

I would love to know what you make of it!
 

Grandpa

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2011
11,550
3,185
113
#31
Hey CharliRenee!

I love that story! The story of Balaam in Numbers is so interesting as the more you read it, the more questions you ask. I write down all my questions when I study but the list is too long on this story!

Not only the question of the donkey having perfect intelligent reasoning, indeed speaking at all, but that Balaam didn't question why he was talking back to his donkey in the first place?

This reminds me of the nonsensical reaction in the character in the Franz Kafka novel " The Metamorphosis”. The salesman Gregor Samsa wakes one morning to find himself inexplicably transformed into a huge insect. But Gregor then worries when he wakes up that he is not going to be able to go to work.

You would think Balaam's first response would be, "How come you speak being a donkey?"

"Then the LORD opened the mouth of the donkey, and she said to Balaam, “What have I done to you that you have struck me these three times?” Balaam answered the donkey, "You have made a fool of me! If I had a sword in my hand, I would kill you right now!" Numbers 22:31

Then Balaam changes in speech from being full of violence and rage to being passive and calm. One minute he is beating the donkey in a fury threatening to kill her, the next just passively saying "No" to the donkeys extremely patient and enlightened speech. A bit like a little kid might answer.

So the donkey said to Balaam, “Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden, ever since I became yours, to this day? Was I ever disposed to do this to you?

” And he said, “No.” (Num 2:30)

A change in mood from rage to reason?

He had not seen the Angel at that point or had his eyes opened.

The Angel would have killed Balaam if it hadn't been for the donkey and says as much, yet the Angel still let Balaam go on with his journey and instructs him he will be told what he will say..

Yet Balaams answer is still odd - almost like "well if you think it's evil, or course I won't go". (Like he didn't know by that point?). It seems only an evil can be stopped by fear in some. Only seeing the Angel with a sword drawn stopped Balaam yet still he acted oddly. He might as well have said, "oh well, if you say so; I don't have to go if you don't want me to go". This is really odd and not normal behaviour.

If most people saw an Angel about to kill them for disobeying God, you would think that would be enough! But it clearly wasn't enough (or he forgot) as it didn't stop him trying to harm Israel later either, even after the blessing and before he was slain. He surely knew the will of God by that point? This story continues to raise even more questions than it answers but I am sure we are supposed to pay attention to those red flags!

If the Angel was going to kill Balaam before the donkey stopped him doing so, why did God tell Balaam he could go, especially after he said no before?

The donkeys actions seem central to the story as they saved Baalam his life but did not change Balaam's way his way of thinking, as we find out later that after all this, he went back to his place, but still then helped trap the Israelites later in Numbers 25. For this God plagued them, and 24,000 men died. So he might not have been a false prophet but he was a wicked one.

Peter says Balaam“ loved the wages of wickedness” 2 Peter.2:15

It is also strange how later on after the two attempts to get Balaam to curse the Israelites that Balak insists upon he still keeps going. You would think by now after twice failing, he would have given up? The "Spirit of God" came upon him before he blesses Israel so poetically in the third attempt, which it had not happened the previous two attempts when "he went not, as at other times, to seek for enchantments".

Such a mysterious story. So much more to it than the question of whether Donkeys can talk or not. Did the donkey represented Balaam's enlightened intellect he was ignoring?

He couldn't have been that enlightened, as he later gets his reward from Balak after all. Balaam “error” again shown with him advising the Moabites on how to entice the people of Israel with prostitutes and idolatry after all. He must have forgotten about the Angel who was going to kill him or Gods Will? Yet how could he forget that?

Balaam was a strange character indeed. It was like he was two people.

One a wicked greedy sorcerer who loved gain, and the other one a prophet of God.

Whether he was a “false prophet” is unknown as I don't know if he said anything false or not, just wicked.

I would love to know what you make of it!
It may be important to note that Balaam went to the highest spot the third time to "curse" Israel. He maybe wasn't high enough the first two times to see what he saw the third time. Or maybe it was the spirit of God combined with his elevation that did the trick.
 
Mar 28, 2016
15,954
1,527
113
#32
You would think Balaam's first response would be, "How come you speak being a donkey?"

"Then the LORD opened the mouth of the donkey, and she said to Balaam, “What have I done to you that you have struck me these three times?” Balaam answered the donkey, "You have made a fool of me! If I had a sword in my hand, I would kill you right now!" Numbers 22:31

Then Balaam changes in speech from being full of violence and rage to being passive and calm. One minute he is beating the donkey in a fury threatening to kill her, the next just passively saying "No" to the donkeys extremely patient and enlightened speech. A bit like a little kid might answer.

So the donkey said to Balaam, “Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden, ever since I became yours, to this day? Was I ever disposed to do this to you?

” And he said, “No.” (Num 2:30)

A change in mood from rage to reason?

He had not seen the Angel at that point or had his eyes opened.

The Angel would have killed Balaam if it hadn't been for the donkey and says as much, yet the Angel still let Balaam go on with his journey and instructs him he will be told what he will say..
I think one thing to keep in mind is if the voice of God can calm the Sea or create a universe it can surely work in a person moving them to do the will of the unseen messenger. God's word.

It prevented the madness of that false prophet. . revealing to us God is not served by human hands .He can use a unbeliever typified as a Donkey as one of the many manner He did bring prophecy, the word of God .

He will not share that glory with the corrupted flesh of mankind. Even the Son of man, Jesus said of his own flesh it profits for nothing. Neither the flesh of the donkey or the flesh of mankind could profit

It is the unseen Spirit of faith, Christ's working in us that does and can quicken our souls giving us eternal life..

John 6: 63 It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.
 

Heyjude

Active member
Sep 7, 2019
277
121
43
#33
It may be important to note that Balaam went to the highest spot the third time to "curse" Israel. He maybe wasn't high enough the first two times to see what he saw the third time. Or maybe it was the spirit of God combined with his elevation that did the trick.

Hi Grandpa! Yes that is interesting.

It is interesting how the first oracle or prophecy did not turn out to be true anyhow, as Baalam says

“Who can count the dust of Jacob, and the number of the fourth part of Israel? Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his! (Numbers 23:10)


Well that didn't happen as Balaam died differently.

The second time Barak took him to the top of Pisgah.

“And he brought him into the field of Zophim, to the top of Pisgah, and built seven altars, and offered a bullock and a ram on every altar”. (Numbers 23:14)

Balak even has the nerve to choose the same place God showed Moses the Promised Land.

In Deuteronomy, God commanded Moses to climb up and view the Promised Land from Mount Nebo.

"Then Moses climbed Mount Nebo from the plains of Moab to the top of Pisgah, across from Jericho” (Deuteronomy 34:1)


Another noticeable thing is what Balak says.

“And when he came to him, behold, he stood by his burnt offering, and the princes of Moab with him. And Balak said unto him, What hath the Lord spoken?” (Numbers 17.23)

Balak is actually asking what the Lord says about cursing Israel. As if he had to ask?
Balak has lost his senses and Baalam is a good example of a man trying to serve two masters.

The only one with any sense is the Donkey.
 

CharliRenee

Member
Staff member
Nov 4, 2014
6,680
7,146
113
#34
Hey CharliRenee!

I love that story! The story of Balaam in Numbers is so interesting as the more you read it, the more questions you ask. I write down all my questions when I study but the list is too long on this story!

Not only the question of the donkey having perfect intelligent reasoning, indeed speaking at all, but that Balaam didn't question why he was talking back to his donkey in the first place?

This reminds me of the nonsensical reaction in the character in the Franz Kafka novel " The Metamorphosis”. The salesman Gregor Samsa wakes one morning to find himself inexplicably transformed into a huge insect. But Gregor then worries when he wakes up that he is not going to be able to go to work.

You would think Balaam's first response would be, "How come you speak being a donkey?"

"Then the LORD opened the mouth of the donkey, and she said to Balaam, “What have I done to you that you have struck me these three times?” Balaam answered the donkey, "You have made a fool of me! If I had a sword in my hand, I would kill you right now!" Numbers 22:31

Then Balaam changes in speech from being full of violence and rage to being passive and calm. One minute he is beating the donkey in a fury threatening to kill her, the next just passively saying "No" to the donkeys extremely patient and enlightened speech. A bit like a little kid might answer.

So the donkey said to Balaam, “Am I not your donkey on which you have ridden, ever since I became yours, to this day? Was I ever disposed to do this to you?

” And he said, “No.” (Num 2:30)

A change in mood from rage to reason?

He had not seen the Angel at that point or had his eyes opened.

The Angel would have killed Balaam if it hadn't been for the donkey and says as much, yet the Angel still let Balaam go on with his journey and instructs him he will be told what he will say..

Yet Balaams answer is still odd - almost like "well if you think it's evil, or course I won't go". (Like he didn't know by that point?). It seems only an evil can be stopped by fear in some. Only seeing the Angel with a sword drawn stopped Balaam yet still he acted oddly. He might as well have said, "oh well, if you say so; I don't have to go if you don't want me to go". This is really odd and not normal behaviour.

If most people saw an Angel about to kill them for disobeying God, you would think that would be enough! But it clearly wasn't enough (or he forgot) as it didn't stop him trying to harm Israel later either, even after the blessing and before he was slain. He surely knew the will of God by that point? This story continues to raise even more questions than it answers but I am sure we are supposed to pay attention to those red flags!

If the Angel was going to kill Balaam before the donkey stopped him doing so, why did God tell Balaam he could go, especially after he said no before?

The donkeys actions seem central to the story as they saved Baalam his life but did not change Balaam's way his way of thinking, as we find out later that after all this, he went back to his place, but still then helped trap the Israelites later in Numbers 25. For this God plagued them, and 24,000 men died. So he might not have been a false prophet but he was a wicked one.

Peter says Balaam“ loved the wages of wickedness” 2 Peter.2:15

It is also strange how later on after the two attempts to get Balaam to curse the Israelites that Balak insists upon he still keeps going. You would think by now after twice failing, he would have given up? The "Spirit of God" came upon him before he blesses Israel so poetically in the third attempt, which it had not happened the previous two attempts when "he went not, as at other times, to seek for enchantments".

Such a mysterious story. So much more to it than the question of whether Donkeys can talk or not. Did the donkey represented Balaam's enlightened intellect he was ignoring?

He couldn't have been that enlightened, as he later gets his reward from Balak after all. Balaam “error” again shown with him advising the Moabites on how to entice the people of Israel with prostitutes and idolatry after all. He must have forgotten about the Angel who was going to kill him or Gods Will? Yet how could he forget that?

Balaam was a strange character indeed. It was like he was two people.

One a wicked greedy sorcerer who loved gain, and the other one a prophet of God.

Whether he was a “false prophet” is unknown as I don't know if he said anything false or not, just wicked.

I would love to know what you make of it!
Hello Heyjude, :D...

I'm not there yet, though I have read it before, but not with the depth that you clearly have. As I enter into it, I will be come back here and read those questions again that came to your mind so that perhaps I can widen my understanding. Thank you for taking the time, it is a blessing.
 

Shekinahglory

Active member
Aug 29, 2019
157
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#35
I am now back in the book of Numbers and learning the tribes, the banners, and the encamping around the temple. It is incredibly exciting to see the physical picture forming of the Ezekial and revelation description of the throne...

I am thrilled as I have so so so much to learn.

Do you like the book of numbers?

I have yet to understand the numbers. The bible is very specific in the call to take a census in that time. I have yet to understand what to glean from the numbers themselves.

As I see the structure in numbers, from the role and placement of the levites, to the military of tribes surrounding them, I am reminded how important our calling is with regards to serving others, working together for the cause of God, rather than just moving inwardly with regards to our own personal salvation.
Hi do you know when the tabernacle was set in place the way Israel was to encamp around showed the cross with the tabernacle right in the middle just as Christ would hang on the cross. If you had been able to fly over it the teants would have looked like the grain of the wood. Have fun in numbers Christ is all over the place.
 

CharliRenee

Member
Staff member
Nov 4, 2014
6,680
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113
#36
Hi do you know when the tabernacle was set in place the way Israel was to encamp around showed the cross with the tabernacle right in the middle just as Christ would hang on the cross. If you had been able to fly over it the teants would have looked like the grain of the wood. Have fun in numbers Christ is all over the place.
Oh yes, thank you. I have been seeing this and am so tickled by how much we see Christ. He is so rewarding.
 

Shekinahglory

Active member
Aug 29, 2019
157
62
28
#37
Hi do you know when the tabernacle was set in place the way Israel was to encamp around showed the cross with the tabernacle right in the middle just as Christ would hang on the cross. If you had been able to fly over it the teants would have looked like the grain of the wood. Have fun in numbers Christ is all over the place.
Hi it depended on the Shekinah Glory. They were to be ready to go on a moments notice and set up in the same manner. Just as there was no rudder to steer the ark. We are let by the Spirit . Wish I could be more help. You have refreshed me. Hearing the excited joy of these great things you are discovering brought back those feelings I had then, thank you and God bless. If I can be of any help please let me know.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
20,926
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#38
Hi it depended on the Shekinah Glory.
The term "Shekinah" (meaning "dwelling" and by extension "divine presence") was invented by Jewish rabbis. It is not found in the Torah or in the OT.

The Hebrew word כָּבוֹד (kabowd) simply means "glory" -- the brightness of God's glory -- which always appeared between the Cherubim over the Mercy Seat within the Tabernacle, but only for the sight of Moses.

And there I will meet with the children of Israel, and the tabernacle shall be sanctified by my glory. (Exod 29:43)

Then a cloud covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. And Moses was not able to enter into the tent of the congregation, because the cloud abode thereon, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle (Exod 40:34,35)

Whenever God spoke to Moses in Numbers, He spoke audibly from His glory, which would appear between the Cherubim above the Mercy Seat over the Ark of the Covenant (or Testimony).

And when Moses was gone into the tabernacle of the congregation to speak with Him, then he heard the voice of one speaking unto him from off the mercy seat that was upon the ark of testimony, from between the two cherubims: and He spake unto him. (Num 7:89)

The amazing thing is that even though the Israelites knew that God personally came to that tabernacle to communicate with Moses, they constantly showed their unbelief in the wilderness. On the other hand, if God's glory were to literally appear within any church building today, it would be an awesome sight which would be reported worldwide. However, we are told in Scripture that the glory of God is in the face of Jesus Christ. And that is how Paul was blinded as he traveled to Damascus.
 

Shekinahglory

Active member
Aug 29, 2019
157
62
28
#39
The term "Shekinah" (meaning "dwelling" and by extension "divine presence") was invented by Jewish rabbis. It is not found in the Torah or in the OT.

The Hebrew word כָּבוֹד (kabowd) simply means "glory" -- the brightness of God's glory -- which always appeared between the Cherubim over the Mercy Seat within the Tabernacle, but only for the sight of Moses.

And there I will meet with the children of Israel, and the tabernacle shall be sanctified by my glory. (Exod 29:43)

Then a cloud covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. And Moses was not able to enter into the tent of the congregation, because the cloud abode thereon, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle (Exod 40:34,35)

Whenever God spoke to Moses in Numbers, He spoke audibly from His glory, which would appear between the Cherubim above the Mercy Seat over the Ark of the Covenant (or Testimony).

And when Moses was gone into the tabernacle of the congregation to speak with Him, then he heard the voice of one speaking unto him from off the mercy seat that was upon the ark of testimony, from between the two cherubims: and He spake unto him. (Num 7:89)

The amazing thing is that even though the Israelites knew that God personally came to that tabernacle to communicate with Moses, they constantly showed their unbelief in the wilderness. On the other hand, if God's glory were to literally appear within any church building today, it would be an awesome sight which would be reported worldwide. However, we are told in Scripture that the glory of God is in the face of Jesus Christ. And that is how Paul was blinded as he traveled to Damascus.
Nice. Teaching thanks God bless
 

Heyjude

Active member
Sep 7, 2019
277
121
43
#40
Hello Heyjude, :D...

I'm not there yet, though I have read it before, but not with the depth that you clearly have. As I enter into it, I will be come back here and read those questions again that came to your mind so that perhaps I can widen my understanding. Thank you for taking the time, it is a blessing.
Thanks CharliRenee, I don't really know a lot about anything, but I do picture this guy Baalam, I somehow have an image in my mind of what he was like. I sort of think in pictures sometimes and I can almost view this guy walking around in his fancy cloaks and turbans and getting a reputation for being a "prophetic hit man". A Prophet for Profit!