Random thought- first born deaths in Egypt

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JakeIA

New member
Nov 24, 2019
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#1
How did that work? I mean, for example, I'm my mother's first born, and my father's 3rd child. so, if my parents were both Egyptians, does that mean I would have died along with my oldest brother who's 10 years older than me? Does that mean my half sister who is the first born of my stepmother would have passed too? That would be 3 death for one person, and 1 each for his other 2 wives.
 

Oncefallen

Idiot in Chief
Staff member
Jan 15, 2011
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#2
I think the Genesis account is clear that the firstborn SON of every Egyptian died, that would be the first son born to every man. Yes, that would potentially mean numerous deaths to one father if he had sons with multiple women .
 

miknik5

Senior Member
Jun 2, 2016
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#3
How did that work? I mean, for example, I'm my mother's first born, and my father's 3rd child. so, if my parents were both Egyptians, does that mean I would have died along with my oldest brother who's 10 years older than me? Does that mean my half sister who is the first born of my stepmother would have passed too? That would be 3 death for one person, and 1 each for his other 2 wives.
It was a picture of sacrifice and redemption...
 

Guojing

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2019
3,861
663
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#4
How did that work? I mean, for example, I'm my mother's first born, and my father's 3rd child. so, if my parents were both Egyptians, does that mean I would have died along with my oldest brother who's 10 years older than me? Does that mean my half sister who is the first born of my stepmother would have passed too? That would be 3 death for one person, and 1 each for his other 2 wives.
The question I really want to find out in heaven is that, supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would my first born also be spared that night?
 

miknik5

Senior Member
Jun 2, 2016
7,826
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#5
The question I really want to find out in heaven is that, supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would my first born also be spared that night?
They would have been spared...
 

miknik5

Senior Member
Jun 2, 2016
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#6
The angel of death would have passed over every ¨ḧouse¨ marked by the blood.
 

JakeIA

New member
Nov 24, 2019
7
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#7
The question I really want to find out in heaven is that, supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would my first born also be spared that night?
That was what my impression has always been. everyone in a house with blood on the door, would be spared.
 

miknik5

Senior Member
Jun 2, 2016
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#9
Because every ´house¨ marked by the blood of the lamb IS spared...
 

Guojing

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2019
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#10
Because every ´house¨ marked by the blood of the lamb IS spared...
As I said, I would like to think so but its an argument from silence.

Was hoping to have examples of any egyptians who were close enough to their Jewish slaves, who actually did that.

Nevermind, there are many questions where the scripture is silence that I would really like to know, guess we have to wait until heaven to really know for sure.

Another question is, "Did James and the elders accepted the money that Paul raised from the Gentile churches and delivered to them in Acts 21?" ;)
 
Jul 3, 2015
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#11
I would like to think so, but how can one be sure from scripture?
One can be sure that the blood on the doorposts at the first Passover was a foreshadowing of our being covered by the shed righteous blood of Christ, He being the promised unblemished Lamb of God Who died at Passover in our place, which removes our sin when we believe by grace through faith in His atoning sacrifice, which saves from us the penalty of sin which is death, by reconciling us to God.

 
Feb 1, 2020
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#12
It is the firstborn son of the father. Also keep in mind our generation is more wicked and are given to whoredom in this age to a larger extent than, shamefully, even the ancient pagans. Though there'd be polygamy in the ancient times, this was not as wide outside of the royals of Egypt, and divorce and fornication in the ancient world wasn't like how it is today, so one's firstborn son would not be as confusing of an issue back then as today. Taking a father's firstborn son is of course significant, the sacrifice of the Passover pointing towards Jesus.
 
Nov 24, 2012
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#13
Another question is, "Did James and the elders accepted the money that Paul raised from the Gentile churches and delivered to them in Acts 21?" ;)
I don't see why not...

Romans 15:26-28 (KJV) For it hath pleased them of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor saints which are at Jerusalem. It hath pleased them verily; and their debtors they are. For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things. When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit, I will come by you into Spain.
 
Feb 1, 2020
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#14
The question I really want to find out in heaven is that, supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would my first born also be spared that night?


They would have been spared...
I would like to think so, but how can one be sure from scripture?


Yes if they would have believed in the blood of the Lamb, which was the token of the promise of the Lord to the Israelites, the Egyptians would have been spared.

However this is just shoulda-woulda-coulda and sympathizing with wicked Egypt. They did not believe in the blood of the Lamb for there was not a house from Pharaoh to all of his slaves, all of the Egyptians, that did not have one dead says the scriptures.

Exodus 12:29-30

29 And it came to pass, that at midnight the Lord smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh that sat on his throne unto the firstborn of the captive that was in the dungeon; and all the firstborn of cattle.

30 And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he, and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and there was a great cry in Egypt; for there was not a house where there was not one dead.
 

Guojing

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2019
3,861
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#15
I don't see why not...

Romans 15:26-28 (KJV) For it hath pleased them of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor saints which are at Jerusalem. It hath pleased them verily; and their debtors they are. For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things. When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit, I will come by you into Spain.
That passage is trying to urge Gentiles to contribute to the poor saints in Jerusalem yes.

But Acts 21 was silent on whether James and the elders did accept the money. If you read vs20-25, they were mentioning some unhappiness among Jewish believers about what Paul said regarding circumcision, and suggested Paul pay for some Jewish ceremonies, which would involved money. That money could have came from the money raised.

Either way, scripture is silent there.
 

Guojing

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2019
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663
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#16
Yes if they would have believed in the blood of the Lamb, which was the token of the promise of the Lord to the Israelites, the Egyptians would have been spared.

However this is just shoulda-woulda-coulda and sympathizing with wicked Egypt. They did not believe in the blood of the Lamb for there was not a house from Pharaoh to all of his slaves, all of the Egyptians, that did not have one dead says the scriptures.

Exodus 12:29-30

29 And it came to pass, that at midnight the Lord smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh that sat on his throne unto the firstborn of the captive that was in the dungeon; and all the firstborn of cattle.

30 And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he, and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and there was a great cry in Egypt; for there was not a house where there was not one dead.
Yep, this verse stated "All the Egyptians", so it can give people the impression that, even if Egyptians would have entered the house of the Jews and stayed throughout the whole night, their first born might not have been saved.
 
Feb 1, 2020
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#17
Yep, this verse stated "All the Egyptians", so it can give people the impression that, even if Egyptians would have entered the house of the Jews and stayed throughout the whole night, their first born might not have been saved.
The blood did not save the Israelites, the blood of the Lamb was a token, a sign for the angel of death sent by the Lord to Passover their house. If the Egyptians believed in the blood of the Lamb they would have been saved, but they just simply did not believe in the promise of the God of Israel.
 

Guojing

Well-known member
Jan 12, 2019
3,861
663
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#18
The blood did not save the Israelites, the blood of the Lamb was a token, a sign for the angel of death sent by the Lord to Passover their house. If the Egyptians believed in the blood of the Lamb they would have been saved, but they just simply did not believe in the promise of the God of Israel.
So what I was asking is, "Supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would their first born also be spared that night?"

What do you think?
 
Feb 1, 2020
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#19
So what I was asking is, "Supposed an egyptian chose to put his entire family in the same house as a Jew who put the blood on the doorpost, would their first born also be spared that night?"

What do you think?
Yes they would have been spared because they'd have believed on the blood of the Lamb, the token of God's promise.

However, this is a hypothetical and is not what happened. They did not believe in the God of Israel nor his promise and every house of Egypt from Pharoah to his slaves, all of the Egyptians, was weeping and gnashing their teeth in the darkness. Also very significant.
 
May 24, 2014
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#20
How did that work? I mean, for example, I'm my mother's first born, and my father's 3rd child. so, if my parents were both Egyptians, does that mean I would have died along with my oldest brother who's 10 years older than me? Does that mean my half sister who is the first born of my stepmother would have passed too? That would be 3 death for one person, and 1 each for his other 2 wives.
Lets you and me get behind the bloody doorpost. We will then be good to go no matter what.:)