Should Christian Meditate ?

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Sep 3, 2019
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#21
In some Eastern meditation, there is not a focus on emptying the mind so much as bringing the mind into observation. A person meditates on the body (that is, sensual: listening to sounds, like a river... or visual meditation, gazing upon a candle), meditates on feelings, meditates on thoughts (watching thoughts come and go in pure observation), or meditates on phenomena. You can also be in samatha meditation with just a peaceful open awareness, as you might feel as a child laying down on a grassy bank after a long run with friends.. not thinking anything in particular, just resting. The focus of Eastern meditations are more often thus, rather than emptying the mind and trying to force an unnatural blank state. Why focus on these meditation points? These categories (above) exercise and develop our capacity to correctly observe the turnings of the mind. As we further our accuracy in observation, we can find useful ways to step back and see the mind's workings with objectivity. Such objectivity can be useful. As Christians, we can see turns of the mind which might lead us away from God's law more readily. For instance, if every time I run out of peanut butter, I get grumpy and ill tempered... then I come to observe this. I realize the mind's tendency when I first think "I think I will look for some peanut butter and make a sandwich." If we know our mind we can then make the mental correction- "...I will look, but if I am out of peanut butter, my mind becomes grumpy. Instead of becoming grumpy with my housemate, I am going to be charitable and cultivate joy that s/he must have enjoyed a nice sandwich. I will wish them well and extend charity." In this way, Eastern meditation can be also used to further our Christian goals with no faith impediment.
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
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#22
if one is a Christian, they need not mediate on peanut butter challenges,
but what lies beneath the jelly and the bread...

seriously, we all must 'over-come' our worldly egos and put others before
ourselves...
 

Angela53510

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2011
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#23
In some Eastern meditation, there is not a focus on emptying the mind so much as bringing the mind into observation. A person meditates on the body (that is, sensual: listening to sounds, like a river... or visual meditation, gazing upon a candle), meditates on feelings, meditates on thoughts (watching thoughts come and go in pure observation), or meditates on phenomena. You can also be in samatha meditation with just a peaceful open awareness, as you might feel as a child laying down on a grassy bank after a long run with friends.. not thinking anything in particular, just resting. The focus of Eastern meditations are more often thus, rather than emptying the mind and trying to force an unnatural blank state. Why focus on these meditation points? These categories (above) exercise and develop our capacity to correctly observe the turnings of the mind. As we further our accuracy in observation, we can find useful ways to step back and see the mind's workings with objectivity. Such objectivity can be useful. As Christians, we can see turns of the mind which might lead us away from God's law more readily. For instance, if every time I run out of peanut butter, I get grumpy and ill tempered... then I come to observe this. I realize the mind's tendency when I first think "I think I will look for some peanut butter and make a sandwich." If we know our mind we can then make the mental correction- "...I will look, but if I am out of peanut butter, my mind becomes grumpy. Instead of becoming grumpy with my housemate, I am going to be charitable and cultivate joy that s/he must have enjoyed a nice sandwich. I will wish them well and extend charity." In this way, Eastern meditation can be also used to further our Christian goals with no faith impediment.
This is a lie from the devil! Combining Christianity with Eastern religions is called "syncretism." It is what the prophets in the OT railed about! We should never follow other religions, their rites and rituals, nor their gods.

"Syncretism, in this case, is the mixing of Christianity with something else such that they become a different gospel. Syncretism can take place with a postive-thinking gospel, a nationalist emphasis, or emerging culture. Syncretism happens more than we might know.

When anything is added to the message of the gospel, the uniqueness and sufficiency of Christ is compromised and another gospel can be created that is, well, actually not the gospel."

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2014/june/avoiding-pitfall-of-syncretism.html
 
Sep 28, 2019
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#24
The purists say you shouldnt meditate without using a Godly word as mantra at least. Many think meditation "lets the devil in. "
Currently I am of the view that meditation is harmless and a good way to calm the mind. A Christian can incorporate prayer and meditation into their daily life.
If in doubt ask God in prayer.I dont think He minds to be honest. 😀
 
Sep 3, 2019
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#25
This is a lie from the devil! Combining Christianity with Eastern religions is called "syncretism." It is what the prophets in the OT railed about! We should never follow other religions, their rites and rituals, nor their gods.

"Syncretism, in this case, is the mixing of Christianity with something else such that they become a different gospel. Syncretism can take place with a postive-thinking gospel, a nationalist emphasis, or emerging culture. Syncretism happens more than we might know.

When anything is added to the message of the gospel, the uniqueness and sufficiency of Christ is compromised and another gospel can be created that is, well, actually not the gospel."

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2014/june/avoiding-pitfall-of-syncretism.html
With respect, you misunderstand.

Observing the mind is a valuable tool in many respects. Learning how to observe the mind is not faith specific. I would think advocating not observing the mind would seem silly to anyone aiming at a deeper understanding of life and faith.