Dictionary game

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Waggles

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Sep 21, 2017
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#42
PRAXIS
noun, plural prax·is·es, prax·es [prak-seez]
1: practice, as distinguished from theory; application or use, as of knowledge or skills.
2: convention, habit, or custom.
3: a set of examples for practice.
credit: dictionary.com

kinda like our walk in the Lord - one reads the book then you got to live it = praxis

next word - inebriation
 

CharliRenee

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Nov 4, 2014
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#43
Inebriation

Drunkenness; intoxication.

synonyms:intoxication, drunkenness, insobriety, tipsiness;
informaltightness;
rarecrapulence
"he's in a state of extreme inebriation"

Petrichor
 

Waggles

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#44
petrichor
noun
pe·tri·chor | \ ˈpe-trə-ˌkȯr \
Definition of petrichor

: a distinctive, earthy, usually pleasant odour that is associated with rainfall especially when following a warm, dry period and that arises from a combination of volatile plant oils and geosmin released from the soil into the air and by ozone carried by downdrafts. Australian scientists first documented the process of petrichor formation in 1964 …
— Tim Logan "The intensity of the petrichor smell can vary with the type of soil and how heavily the rain is falling."

History and Etymology for petrichor

PETR(O)- + ICHOR

NOTE: The word was introduced by the Australian mineral chemists Isabel Joy Bear (born 1927) and Richard Grenfell Thomas (†1974) in "Nature of argillaceous odour," Nature, vol. 201, No. 4923 (March 7, 1964), pp. 993-95.
According to the authors, "The diverse nature of the host material has led us to propose the name 'petrichor' for this apparently unique odour which can be regarded as an 'ichor' or 'tenuous essence' derived from rock or stone."
 

Waggles

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#47
Next Word: ANTHROPOMORPHIC
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anthropomorphic
adjective
ascribing human form or attributes to a being or thing not human, especially to an idol
resembling or made to resemble a human form:

Your favourite TV shows when you were a toddler probably had anthropomorphic characters like Thomas the Tank Engine
who are non-human, but have human characteristics, such as human faces and the ability to talk.
 

Deuteronomy

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Jun 11, 2018
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#48
I will add these thoughts concerning "anthropomorphic" as well (for anyone who is interested).

Since the finite cannot grasp the infinite, how can we, as finite human beings, learn anything about God or have any significant or meaningful knowledge of who He is? Calvin said that God in His graciousness and mercy condescends to lisp for our benefit. In other words, He addresses us on our terms and in our own language, just as a parent might coo when talking to an infant. We call it “baby talk”; nevertheless, something meaningful and intelligible is communicated.

Anthropomorphism
We find this idea in the Bible’s anthropomorphic language. Anthropomorphic comes from the Greek word anthrōpos, which means “man,” “mankind,” or “human,” and morphology is the term for the study of forms and shapes. Therefore, we can easily see that anthropomorphic simply means “in human form.” When we read in Scripture that the heavens are God’s throne and the earth is His footstool (Isa. 66:1), we imagine a massive deity seated in heaven and stretching out His feet on the earth, but we do not really think that is what God actually does. Likewise, we read that God owns the cattle on a thousand hills (Ps. 50:10), but we do not interpret that to mean that He is a great cattle rancher who comes down and has a shootout with the devil every now and then. To the contrary, that image communicates to us that God is powerful and self-sufficient just like a human rancher who owns vast herds of cattle.

The Scriptures tell us that God is not a man—He is spirit (John 4:24) and therefore not physical—yet He is often described with physical attributes. There are mentions of His eyes, His head, His strong right arm, His feet, and His mouth. Scripture speaks of God having not only physical attributes but also emotional attributes. We read in places of God repenting, yet elsewhere in the Bible we are told that God does not change His mind. God is described in human terms in certain instances in the Bible because it is the only way man knows to speak about God.

We must be careful to understand what the Bible’s anthropomorphic language conveys. On the one hand, the Bible affirms what these forms communicate about God; on the other hand, in a more didactic way, it warns us that God is not a man. However, this does not mean that abstract, technical, theological language is superior to anthropomorphic language, so that we are better off saying, “God is omnipotent,” rather than “God owns the cattle on a thousand hills.” The only way we can understand the word omni or all is by our human ability to understand what all means. Similarly, we do not conceive of power in the same way God conceives of power. He has an infinite understanding of power, whereas we have a finite understanding of it.

For all these reasons, God does not speak to us in His language; He speaks to us in ours, and because He speaks to us in the only language we can understand, we are able to grasp it. In other words, all biblical language is anthropomorphic, and all language about God is anthropomorphic, because the only language we have at our disposal is anthropomorphic language, and that is because we are human beings. ~Sproul, R. C. (2014). Everyone’s a Theologian: An Introduction to Systematic Theology (pp. 48–49). Orlando, FL: Reformation Trust.

~Deut
 

Deuteronomy

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Jun 11, 2018
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#49
Hello @Waggles, and the next word is ................................... :unsure:

Thanks!

~Deut
 

TabinRivCA

Well-known member
Oct 23, 2018
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#51
sorry had to get off the PC and get ready for church meeting
it takes a good scrub up to become presentable

OK from the Oxford Crossword Dictionary - 15 letters

preachification
Indulgence in moral pronouncements; moralization in a preachy manner

'untoward'
 

Waggles

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Sep 21, 2017
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#52
UNTO'WARD adjective
1. Froward; perverse; refractory; not easily guided or taught.
2. Awkward; ungraceful;
3. Inconvenient; troublesome; unmanageable;

unfavourable or unfortunate:
Untoward circumstances forced him into bankruptcy.
improper:
untoward social behaviour.
Archaic: froward; perverse.

Acts 2:40
And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation.
untoward > skolios > warped, that is, winding; figuratively perverse: - crooked, froward, untoward.

Next word - Chirographer
 

Deuteronomy

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2018
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#53
noun
handwriting; penmanship.
another name for calligraphy
(British)

Next Phrase : POST TENEBRAS LUX (these words are written across the "Reformation Wall" on the grounds of the University of Geneva, Switzerland, a monument made in honor of the principle Reformers & Reformational events and documents as engravings, statues, and bas-relief)
.
 

mar09

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2014
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#54
Post tenebras lux- Latin for "Light after darkness"

New word: mitzvah
The word mitzvah is well-known outside of the Jewish world, but its meaning is often misunderstood and misused.
 

Waggles

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2017
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#55
noun
handwriting; penmanship.
another name for calligraphy
(British)
There is more to chirographer than this
it is a specific job of employment

CHIROGRAPH noun
1. A deed, which, requiring a counterpart, was engrossed twice on the same piece of parchment, with a space between, in which was
written chirograph, through which the parchment was cut, and one part given to each party.
2. A fine, so called from the manner of engrossing, which is still retained in the chirographer's office in England.

CHIROGRAPHER noun He that exercises or professes the art or business of writing.
In England, the chirographer of fines is an officer in the common pleas, who engrosses fines acknowledged in that court,
and delivers the indentures to the parties.
 

Waggles

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2017
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#56
Post tenebras lux- Latin for "Light after darkness"
New word: mitzvah
The word mitzvah is well-known outside of the Jewish world, but its meaning is often misunderstood and misused.
Mitzvah literally means “commandment.”
In fact, Jewish tradition understands exactly 613 mitzvot (plural of mitzvah) to be derived from the Hebrew Bible.
The 613 are listed in Maimonides‘ Sefer Hamitzvot (Book of the Commandments), divided into “positive” and “negative” commandments.
Mitzvot are commandments, traditionally understood to come from God and to be intended for the Jewish people to observe.

But why should the biblical Israelites have bothered to accept and observe the mitzvot?
After God rescued the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt, God expected that the Israelites would in turn observe the mitzvot
in eternal, loving gratitude for this redemption.
Yet, gratitude only goes so far, especially when it comes to observing such commandments as keeping kosher (dietary laws)
or Shabbat (resting and not working on the Sabbath day).
For the past 3,000 or so years, every generation of Jews, rabbis, and scholars, has analyzed and argued about exactly why the Jewish
people should continue to observe the mitzvot.

credit: my jewish learning .com
 

TabinRivCA

Well-known member
Oct 23, 2018
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#58
New word - Chivalry
this is worthy of much more than a copy and paste from dictionary.com
a very Biblical and Christian concept
The code of chivalry had it's roots in the Holy Roman Empire from the idealism of the Cavalrymen involving bravery, individual training and service to others. It's thought to have come from Charlemagne's cavalry. The root meaning is akin to 'horse soldiery' which later became associated with knightly ideals.
(thx for the spelling and history lesson)

'genitor'