Home Ownership for Millenials (humor)

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Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
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#61
She could just love you because you provide her with the house lol
If you had no house, she might not love you as much ay?
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
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#62
Make sure you fix the roof as once thats gone and starts leaking you house is a goner.

I noticed when I moved in to my 'new' school library it was already an older building that had ongoing issues. So basically water is getting in and the school is not coping with downpours.

I am sure most of the money parents pay is to fix up the building. Otherwise all the books will get wet and the computers and printers wont work. When I started so much property was broken or not working and so much had to be thrown away.
 

JaumeJ

Senior Member
Jul 2, 2011
20,815
6,254
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#63
Today was window washing....

Went around the house washing the exterior windows. Mop and squeegee.

They look pretty good now. I got too much soap in the water at first....but eventually hit my stride.
I am sold on microfiber cloth and water or water with a little vinegar. Works great for mirrors, wood, windows, tiles, and more I am sure.
 

JohnDB

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2021
5,147
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#64
I am sold on microfiber cloth and water or water with a little vinegar. Works great for mirrors, wood, windows, tiles, and more I am sure.
I was doing the outside. Needed a bit of detergent. So a little bit goes a long way. Like a teaspoon for 2 gallons. I bought a window mop and a squeegee that go on the end of a pole so I could reach on my ladder.

They look great. At first I used too much soap and they looked streaked and drippy. But when I cut way down on the soap they looked great.
 

JohnDB

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2021
5,147
2,053
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#65
She could just love you because you provide her with the house lol
If you had no house, she might not love you as much ay?
Actually....she is the only one working for a paycheck. I'm mostly retired. I could go to work but she earns enough.....besides my body has been through the ringer after all these years. Where I probably have enough left in it to completely remake this house.....not sure if there's more than that in it.
So I will save us a lot of money by doing all the remodeling and repairs myself. But its the only way to make us happy with the work as well.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
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#66
I think people get a lot of satisfaction looking after a house,if they did not, we would not want to be housekeepers.
Millenials in general want to stay with their parents for as long as they can, as they already know how expensive and time consuming keeping house is. If they really want to keep their own home that is. If not they will move out and pursue other things.

Retired people have a lot more time to do housekeeping (and housework). When you are working and earning away from home, so much time is spent AWAY from home that its really only on weekends when you are already tired that any time gets spent at home. But many things around the home need DAILY attention.
 

JohnDB

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2021
5,147
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#67
Ya know?
When I lived in a luxury apartment I never had visitors to my place....like once or twice in the years I lived there.

Since I've bought a home....I've had people over every week since I've moved in.....every week.

And all this cleaning up for company is getting annoying.

I haven't even started renovations yet....haven't even finished cleaning out the fence line. I got a new zero turn lawnmower....that cost more than my wife's car. But with the rain today it doesn't look like I've mowed the lawn this week. I did get some limbs from the sugar maple down and one dead one cut off from it.

I need a nap.
 

Lynx

Folksy yet erudite
Aug 13, 2014
23,724
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#68
If you were cooking the way you cook now, I would have visited when you were in your luxury apartment. :D
 

JohnDB

Well-known member
Jan 16, 2021
5,147
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#69
If you were cooking the way you cook now, I would have visited when you were in your luxury apartment. :D
Oh I used to travel to my friends houses and cook....it was a lot of fun. I'd put their kitchen, pots and pans through their paces and put on a nice simple gourmet dinner family style....I'd do the prep at mine, load up a big white ice chest with everything and go. Kids running about acting wild....lots of fun....the older kids I would get to help me out a bit.

Now we are getting them all here....just dropping in. I'm down to my last loaf of scratch pullman bread.

I did set the table in the dining room yesterday (no silverware). It looks really nice. The China has a raised grapevine pattern and really looks nice with the Hebron glassware.

I'm more of a in kitchen eater myself though....not much for the stuffiness that the table setting would suggest.
 

Lynx

Folksy yet erudite
Aug 13, 2014
23,724
7,564
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#70
The kitchen is the best place to eat.

As a single guy, I often don't bother with a bowl. The food is already in the pan in which I cooked it. Might as well eat it there.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
7,021
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#71
funny how some older homes would have a 'parlour room' or a 'sitting room' that nobody actually sat in.

I find older homes quite interesting in terms of layout. in Auckland the housing stock can be quite varied, from kitset home to old kauri villa to california bungalow.

State homes always have the same layout and never had any what they call 'indoor outdoor flow'
Art Deco homes had flat roofs
Spanish mission is interesting but the plaster doesnt often hold up in the wet
Brick and tile is the best...low maintainence and smart but make sure the bricks are real bricks and not just veneer!
Villas require a lot of work and painting and are often drafty but they have character

What you are looking for is a home that has 'good bones' if you not a actually building or designing one yourself.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
7,021
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#72
You also want a home that is preferably north facing so you can have a vege kitchen garden

Passive solar homes seem to have been all the rage at one point but proved far too hot in summer
we dont need such a big thermal mass in Aucks the main thing you need to look for in a house if in auckland is weathertight ness becase we have so much rain. I.e make sure the roof has eaves and there are flashings so the water drains away from the house!

Leaky buildings are forever causing problems. I just dont understand why home builders couldnt even build proper homes for people that they could stay warm and dry and with good ventilation.

Ive seen rammed earth homes made of clay they would hold up much better than those ones made out of softwood timber that needs to be chemically treated and gib board or mdf particle board is basically a poor mans cardboard house. Why

Maybe because the building code standards are so shoddy in nz or nobody even reads them.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
22,533
7,021
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#73
Also tip...dont build a house near a cliff or on the edge of one

Ok the view might be nice but it could fall off. You have to allow for an earthquake
 

Genipher

Well-known member
Jan 6, 2019
1,920
1,411
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#74
funny how some older homes would have a 'parlour room' or a 'sitting room' that nobody actually sat in.

I find older homes quite interesting in terms of layout. in Auckland the housing stock can be quite varied, from kitset home to old kauri villa to california bungalow.

State homes always have the same layout and never had any what they call 'indoor outdoor flow'
Art Deco homes had flat roofs
Spanish mission is interesting but the plaster doesnt often hold up in the wet
Brick and tile is the best...low maintainence and smart but make sure the bricks are real bricks and not just veneer!
Villas require a lot of work and painting and are often drafty but they have character

What you are looking for is a home that has 'good bones' if you not a actually building or designing one yourself.
Weren't the sitting rooms for formal company?
Just remembering some of the old stories I've read where the children weren't allowed in the sitting room because the parents didn't want it messed up. I think it was Farmer Boy where the parents left on a trip and Almonzo got ink or something on the parlor room wallpaper because they'd decided to goof off in the forbidden room and his sister had to repair the piece because they didn't want to get in trouble.