Are WOMEN Pastors Biblical??

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Dino246

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Jun 30, 2015
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You continue to deny the simple truth of scripture. Paul admonished Timothy that the pastor of the church is to be the husband of one wife.
You are stubborn in your error. "Pastor" is not "elder".
 
Mar 21, 2009
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You continue to deny the simple truth of scripture. Paul admonished Timothy that the pastor of the church is to be the husband of one wife. Pastors are gifted to the church by God. God will not gift a pastor to the church that does not meet His qualifications. Men will choose for themselves pastors who will tell them what they want to hear.

You are welcome the heretical view of women pastors. Your denomination welcomes women and if they have not already done so will also welcome any others that will teach what the denomination wants taught. Apostacy cannot be choosey except they rule out all who would demand fidelity to the bible. You will be fed a constant diet of unsound doctrine laced with higher criticism of Gods word.

The denominational churches are in open rebellion to Gods word and Gods judgment is due them. Judgment begins at the house of God. God understands unsaved people will not seek righteousness.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
The only hermeneutic in this diatribe is that you're repeating your understanding that Paul commanded pastors to be married.
And the rest seems to be a declaration that all pastors who disagree are not called and not even saved.

This kind of belligerence makes your interpretations suspect.

If I were trying to prove your interpretation I would try to find more support than declaring everyone who does not agree with it as apostate. If this is your only method for exegesis? I need to remind you that it is never a rule of hermeneutics or exegesis. It just makes you look desperate and flustered.

I would look for additional scriptural evidence that Paul would teach that one could not be a pastor if they were single. Which is quite difficult because we have such a long passage in 1 Cor 7 giving the spiritual benefits of remaining single for the sake of "undistracted devotion to the things of the Lord, how he might please the Lord"

Therefore I have strong evidence that being a single pastor with the gift of celibacy is beneficial to being a pastor, apostle, prophet, evangelist. Including the fact that both Jesus and Paul were single. Therefore my scriptural support is weighing in on the side of Paul's meaning is that if he is married he must be married to one wife. For it is not a shame to be single. (1 Cor 7)

Your interpretation would have Paul giving contradictory advice to the Corinthians vs the church at Ephesus. And that is one of the ways those with your view attempt to explain their interpretations. They say that Paul was only addressing Corinthians and his advice on the benefits of remaining single if you have the gift do not apply to the church at Ephesus or pastors. They have no support for this view.

Then they go about to explain this view using the reason of persecution that the Corinthians faced. And yet historically they cannot prove that there was any difference in persecutions faced by either church. Therefore if the hardships that the Corinthians faced was the reason for the advice it would also apply to the Ephesians and maybe even more so as we can read about tremendous persecutions, hardships and seizing of property done to the Ephesian Christians by their persecutors.

Therefore I have strong evidence that it is proper scriptural interpretation to apply Paul's advice about the spiritual benefits of being single to a pastor in Ephesus for the same reasons that he gave to the Corinthians. My desire is to know what the Holy Spirit intended when the scripture was written. I believe I have discovered it.

If a bishop is married he must be the husband of ONE wife, not two or more. If a bishop has children they must be governed well. So that the bishop can be blameless. Also he must not be quarrelsome. Which is a good reason to make sure we are attempting to present hermeneutics and not descend into accusing our opponent of impure motives, anathemas and pronouncements of judgments upon those who do not agree with our interpretation.

1Here is a trustworthy saying: Whoever aspires to be an overseer desires a noble task. 2Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, 3not given to drunkenness, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. 4He must manage his own family well and see that his children obey him, and he must do so in a manner worthy of full a respect. 5(If anyone does not know how to manage his own family, how can he take care of God’s church?) 6He must not be a recent convert, or he may become conceited and fall under the same judgment as the devil. 7He must also have a good reputation with outsiders, so that he will not fall into disgrace and into the devil’s trap.

8In the same way, deacons b are to be worthy of respect, sincere, not indulging in much wine, and not pursuing dishonest gain. 9They must keep hold of the deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience. 10They must first be tested; and then if there is nothing against them, let them serve as deacons.

11In the same way, the women are to be worthy of respect, not malicious talkers but temperate and trustworthy in everything.

12A deacon must be faithful to his wife and must manage his children and his household well. 13Those who have served well gain an excellent standing and great assurance in their faith in Christ Jesus.

14Although I hope to come to you soon, I am writing you these instructions so that, 15if I am delayed, you will know how people ought to conduct themselves in God’s household, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and foundation of the truth.
______________________
. 2Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach,
12A deacon must be faithful to his wife and must manage his children and his household well.


The discussions on the Greek meaning of "husband of one wife" have been interpreted as "a one woman man" and scholars such as Gordon Fee and many others think that is a closer interpretation. Thus the NIV renders it "faithful to his wife"
 
Mar 21, 2009
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This is helpful information from Dr. Ben Witheringon (Professor New Testament Interpretation, Asbury Theological University, graduate of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Durham University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Phoebe was a diakonos in the ekklēsia. in Corinth's port city of Cenchreae. She is not mentioned in the Corinthian correspondence, but she has a prominent place in Rom. 16:I. The term diakonos in Paul's letters does not necessarily denote the same office that "deacon" or in this case "deaconess" later represented. It is clear from 1 Cor. 3:5 and 2 Cor. 3:6; 6:4; 11:15; 11:23 that Paul used diakonos for leadership roles in the Christian community, since he applies it to himself and Apollos. It does not necessarily imply a role subordinate to other church offices, but it does imply a self-perception as one subordinate to God and as a servant to the ekklēsia. that one has been called to serve. It is possible that it refers to someone who is a preacher and teacher, possibly even a traveling missionary.

Paul also calls Phoebe a prostatis, which in view of the context in Romans 16 likely means "patroness," not "protector" or merely "helper." There is clear evidence that women in the Roman world could assume the legal role of prostatis. A papyrus document has been discovered that speaks of a woman becoming the prostatis of her fatherless son in 142 B.C. Furthermore, perhaps one-tenth of the patrons, protectors, or donors to collegia mentioned in inscriptions are women. "As a general rule, then, women as benefactors should be imagined playing their part personally and visibly, out in the open."

In view of the way Paul commends Phoebe, it seems likely that she carried his letter to the Roman Christians, that she was responsible also for reading and interpreting it, and that she was a patroness for Paul and for other Christians. He commends her to the Romans so that they will assist her in collecting funds, perhaps for Paul's planned missionary work in Spain.

The connection here between her socioeconomic position, which brought her social status, and her role as one of the diakonoi is important. It suggests that there were early Christians of relatively high social status who had the time, influence, and funds to take on active leadership roles in the Christian communities. It was easy and perhaps natural for them to assume some leadership roles, especially in view of the household context of the Christian gatherings.

This adopting and adapting of the hierarchical household structure did not have to lead to an exclusively male leadership structure. In a home where a woman, for whatever reason, was the head of the household (e.g., Chloe in 1 Cor. 1:11), she might also become a leader, or the leader, of the ekklēsia. meeting in her house.

The early ekklēsia. probably did not begin with an ideal egalitarian structure and then descend into oppressive patriarchy. It began by taking up the patriarchal institutions of Greco-Roman home and society and reforming them in a community context. Unfortunately, after the NT period, with the effective loss of an eschatological focus on the possible imminent return of Christ and in the heat of the struggle with various heresies, the reforming process was abandoned or exchanged for a conforming schema.

Witherington, Ben. Conflict and Community in Corinth: Socio-rhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2 Corinthians (p. 35). Eerdmans Publishing Co
 

throughfaith

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2020
9,582
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I don't know of any . Could any one give any names as to any ?
 

notuptome

Senior Member
May 17, 2013
15,016
2,506
113
You are stubborn in your error. "Pastor" is not "elder".
Right because there are no qualifications for pastor only elders. Anybody can be a pastor. Raise your hand, get a free college education and a guaranteed job.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
 

notuptome

Senior Member
May 17, 2013
15,016
2,506
113
The only hermeneutic in this diatribe is that you're repeating your understanding that Paul commanded pastors to be married.
And the rest seems to be a declaration that all pastors who disagree are not called and not even saved.

This kind of belligerence makes your interpretations suspect.

If I were trying to prove your interpretation I would try to find more support than declaring everyone who does not agree with it as apostate. If this is your only method for exegesis? I need to remind you that it is never a rule of hermeneutics or exegesis. It just makes you look desperate and flustered.

I would look for additional scriptural evidence that Paul would teach that one could not be a pastor if they were single. Which is quite difficult because we have such a long passage in 1 Cor 7 giving the spiritual benefits of remaining single for the sake of "undistracted devotion to the things of the Lord, how he might please the Lord"

Therefore I have strong evidence that being a single pastor with the gift of celibacy is beneficial to being a pastor, apostle, prophet, evangelist. Including the fact that both Jesus and Paul were single. Therefore my scriptural support is weighing in on the side of Paul's meaning is that if he is married he must be married to one wife. For it is not a shame to be single. (1 Cor 7)

Your interpretation would have Paul giving contradictory advice to the Corinthians vs the church at Ephesus. And that is one of the ways those with your view attempt to explain their interpretations. They say that Paul was only addressing Corinthians and his advice on the benefits of remaining single if you have the gift do not apply to the church at Ephesus or pastors. They have no support for this view.

Then they go about to explain this view using the reason of persecution that the Corinthians faced. And yet historically they cannot prove that there was any difference in persecutions faced by either church. Therefore if the hardships that the Corinthians faced was the reason for the advice it would also apply to the Ephesians and maybe even more so as we can read about tremendous persecutions, hardships and seizing of property done to the Ephesian Christians by their persecutors.

Therefore I have strong evidence that it is proper scriptural interpretation to apply Paul's advice about the spiritual benefits of being single to a pastor in Ephesus for the same reasons that he gave to the Corinthians. My desire is to know what the Holy Spirit intended when the scripture was written. I believe I have discovered it.

If a bishop is married he must be the husband of ONE wife, not two or more. If a bishop has children they must be governed well. So that the bishop can be blameless. Also he must not be quarrelsome. Which is a good reason to make sure we are attempting to present hermeneutics and not descend into accusing our opponent of impure motives, anathemas and pronouncements of judgments upon those who do not agree with our interpretation.

1Here is a trustworthy saying: Whoever aspires to be an overseer desires a noble task. 2Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, 3not given to drunkenness, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. 4He must manage his own family well and see that his children obey him, and he must do so in a manner worthy of full a respect. 5(If anyone does not know how to manage his own family, how can he take care of God’s church?) 6He must not be a recent convert, or he may become conceited and fall under the same judgment as the devil. 7He must also have a good reputation with outsiders, so that he will not fall into disgrace and into the devil’s trap.

8In the same way, deacons b are to be worthy of respect, sincere, not indulging in much wine, and not pursuing dishonest gain. 9They must keep hold of the deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience. 10They must first be tested; and then if there is nothing against them, let them serve as deacons.

11In the same way, the women are to be worthy of respect, not malicious talkers but temperate and trustworthy in everything.

12A deacon must be faithful to his wife and must manage his children and his household well. 13Those who have served well gain an excellent standing and great assurance in their faith in Christ Jesus.

14Although I hope to come to you soon, I am writing you these instructions so that, 15if I am delayed, you will know how people ought to conduct themselves in God’s household, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and foundation of the truth.
______________________
. 2Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach,
12A deacon must be faithful to his wife and must manage his children and his household well.


The discussions on the Greek meaning of "husband of one wife" have been interpreted as "a one woman man" and scholars such as Gordon Fee and many others think that is a closer interpretation. Thus the NIV renders it "faithful to his wife"
Bible truth remains Truth. You will always strive against the bible because you do not like what it teaches. There are plenty of apostates to feed your positions.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
 
Mar 21, 2009
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Bible truth remains Truth. You will always strive against the bible because you do not like what it teaches. There are plenty of apostates to feed your positions.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
Not an interpretation of scripture. You must learn how to exegete.
 

notuptome

Senior Member
May 17, 2013
15,016
2,506
113
Not an interpretation of scripture. You must learn how to exegete.
No here I'm speaking to heart attitude. If you approach the word of God with unbelief no amount of exegesis is going to bring you to the truth.

Gods word is a always true. The truth of Gods word is not dependent on my believing or understanding of the word.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
 
Mar 21, 2009
4,387
1,707
113
New York
Below is a position paper from the Assemblies of God.
ROLE of WOMEN in MINISTRY

BIBLICAL EXAMPLES OF WOMEN IN MINISTRY
Old Testament history includes accounts of strong female leadership in many roles. The following are striking examples: Miriam was a prophet to Israel during the Exodus, alongside her brothers Moses and Aaron (Exodus 15:20). Deborah, both a prophet and a judge, directed Barak to lead the army of Israel into successful combat against Israel’s oppressors (Judges 4 to 5). Huldah, also a prophet, authenticated the scroll of the Law found in the temple and helped spark religious reform in the days of Josiah (2 Kings 22:14–20; 2 Chronicles 34:22–28).
The New Testament also shows that women filled important ministry roles in the Early Church. Tabitha (Dorcas) initiated an effective benevolence ministry (Acts 9:36). Philip’s four unmarried daughters were recognized prophets (Acts 21:8,9). Paul singled out two women, Euodia and Syntyche, as “women who have contended at my side in the cause of the gospel, along with Clement and the rest of my fellow workers” (Philippians 4:2,3). Priscilla was another of Paul’s exemplary “fellow workers in Christ Jesus” (Romans 16:3,4). In Romans 16, Paul greets numerous ministry colleagues, a large number of them women. In these greetings, the word Paul uses to speak of the work (kopiao), or labor, of Mary, Tryphena, Tryphosa, and Persis (Romans 16:6,12) is one he uses extensively for the labor of ministry (1 Corinthians 16:16; 1 Thessalonians 5:12; 1 Timothy 5:17).
Phoebe, a leader in the church at Cenchrea, was highly commended to the church at Rome by Paul (Romans 16:1,2). Unfortunately, translation biases have often obscured Phoebe’s position of leadership, calling her a “servant” (NIV, NASB, ESV). Yet Phoebe was diakonos of the church at Cenchrea. Paul regularly used this term for a minister or leader of a congregation and applied it specifically to Jesus Christ, Tychicus, Epaphras, Timothy, and to his own ministry. Depending on the context, diakonos is usually translated “deacon” or “minister.” Though some translators have chosen the word deaconess (e.g., RSV, because Phoebe was female), the Greek diakonos is a masculine noun. Therefore, it seems likely that diakonos was the designation for an official leadership position in the Early Church and the proper translation for Phoebe’s role is “deacon” (TNIV, NLT, NRSV) or “minister.”
Moreover, a number of translations reflect similar biases by referring to Phoebe as having been a “great help” (NIV) or “helper” (NASB) of many, including Paul himself (Romans 16:2). The Greek term here is prostatis, better translated by the NRSV as “benefactor” with its overtones of equality and leadership.
Junia was identified by Paul as an apostle (Romans 16:7). Beginning in the thirteenth century, a number of scholars and translators masculinized her name to Junias, apparently unwilling to admit that there was a female apostle. However, the name Junia is found more than 250 times in Rome alone, while the masculine form Junias is unknown in any Greco-Roman source. Paul clearly was a strong advocate of women in ministry.
These instances of women filling leadership roles in the Bible should be taken as a divinely approved pattern, not as exceptions to divine decrees. Even a limited number of women with scripturally commended leadership roles affirm that God does indeed call women to spiritual leadership.
A BIBLICAL SURVEY OF THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN MINISTRY
Of primary importance in defining the scriptural role of women in ministry is the biblical meaning of “ministry”. Of Christ our great model, it was said, “For even the Son of Man did not come to be served [diakoneo], but to serve [diakoneo], and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45; cf. Matthew 20:28). The New Testament leadership modeled by Jesus portrays the spiritual leader as a servant, whether male or female. The question of human authority is not of primary significance, though it naturally arises as organization and structure develop.
Genesis 2:18–25 Some expositors have taught that all women should be subordinate to adult men because Eve was created after Adam to be his “helper” (NIV; “help meet”, KJV). Yet the word ezer (“helper”) is never used in the Hebrew Bible with a subordinate meaning. Seventeen out of the twenty times it is used, it refers to God as the helper. Eve was created to be a help (kenegdo) “suitable” or “corresponding to” Adam, not a subordinate.
Some argue that God created men and women with different characteristics and desires, and that these differences explain why leadership roles should be withheld from women. Others attribute these perceived differences to culture and social expectations imposed on children from birth to adulthood. Physical differences and distinctive biological functions are obvious; but it is only by implication that gender differences can be made to suggest leadership limitations.
PAUL’S EMPHASIS ON CHARISMATIC MINISTRY
Ministry in the New Testament is charismatic in nature. It is made possible and energized as the Holy Spirit sovereignly distributes spiritual gifts (charismata) to each member of the body of Christ (Romans 12:6–8; 1 Corinthians 12:7–11,27,28; Ephesians 4:7–12; 1 Peter 4:10–11). While some gifts are a spontaneous work of the Spirit and others are recognized ministry gifts to the Body, all are given for service without regard to gender differentiation. For example, the gift of prophecy is explicitly for both men and women: “Your sons and your daughters will prophesy” (Acts 2:17). The New Testament confirms that women received and exercised this gift of the Spirit (Acts 21:9; 1 Corinthians 11:5).
If Peter found certain statements by Paul hard to understand (2 Peter 3:16), it is no surprise that we, removed by nearly two thousand additional years of history, would share his struggle in interpreting some Pauline passages. While the original audiences were familiar with the problems that Paul addressed, we are left to reconstruct them and apply his prescriptions as best we can in light of the larger context of his letters and biblical revelation. And we, like Peter (2 Peter 3:15), must respect and love our brothers and sisters who hold alternative interpretations on issues that are not critical to our salvation or standing before God. We only request that those interpretations be expressed and practiced in love and consideration for all of God's children, both men and women.
First Corinthians 11:3–12 The statement that “the man is the head of the woman” has for centuries been used to justify the practice of male superiority and to exclude women from spiritual leadership. Two alternative translations for kephale (“head”), debated widely by contemporary evangelical scholars, are (1) “authority over” and (2) “source” or “origin.” Both meanings are found in literature of Paul’s time.
.... continued on next post
 
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ROLE of WOMEN in MINISTRY PART 2

Taking the passage as a whole, the second meaning fits as well as or better than the first meaning, leading to the summary statement of verse 12: “As woman came from man, so also man is born of woman. But everything comes from God.” Even the relationship between the eternal Son and the Father—“the head of Christ is God” (11:3)—fits better as “source” than “authority over” (cf. John 8:42). Without attempting definitively to resolve this debate, we do not find sufficient evidence in kephale to deny leadership roles to women (in light of biblical examples of women in positions of spiritual authority, and in light of the whole counsel of Scripture).
First Corinthians 14:34–36 There are only two passages in the entire New Testament that might seem to contain a prohibition against the ministry of women (1 Corinthians 14:34 and 1 Timothy 2:12). Since these must be placed alongside Paul’s other statements and practices, they can hardly be absolute, unequivocal prohibitions of the ministry of women. Instead, they seem to be dealing with specific, local problems that needed correction. Therefore, Paul’s consistent affirmation of ministering women among his churches must be seen as his true perspective, rather than the apparent prohibitions of these two passages, themselves subject to conflicting interpretation.
There are various interpretations of what Paul was limiting when he said, “women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak” (1 Corinthians 14:34). Paul uses a word to limit the speech of women (sigato) that previously has been used to limit the speech of those speaking in tongues if there is no interpretation (1 Corinthians 14:28) and prophets if a prophecy is given to another person (v. 30). It is only under such specific circumstances that the speech of tongues speakers, prophets, and women are to be silenced in the church. Under what circumstances then, is the speech of women to be limited?
Options include (1) chatter in public services, (2) ecstatic disruptions, (3) certain authoritative ministries (such as judging prophecies), and (4) asking questions during the service. It is apparent that Paul permitted women both to pray and prophesy in public worship at Corinth (1 Corinthians 11:5). Moreover, Paul advised that those who prophesy (evidently including women) should be among the ones to judge prophecies (1 Corinthians 14:29). Therefore, as with Paul’s constraints on both men and women tongues speakers and prophets, it may be that Paul’s additional constraints on women have to do with other forms of disruptive speech.
While the precise nature of Paul’s prohibition in this text is a matter of ongoing study, we do conclude that it does not prohibit female leadership, but like the rest of the chapter, it admonishes that “everything should be done in a fitting and orderly way” (1 Corinthians 14:40).
First Timothy 2:11–15 The meaning and application of Paul's statement, “I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man; she must be silent” (1 Timothy 2:12), have puzzled interpreters and resulted in a variety of positions on the role of women in ministry and spiritual leadership.
From the above survey of passages on exemplary women in ministry, it is clear that Paul recognized the ministry of women. There were obvious problems in Ephesus, some relating to women. Some women were evidently given to immodest apparel and adornment (1 Timothy 2:9). The younger widows were “into the habit of being idle... And not only do they become idlers, but also gossips and busybodies, saying things they ought not to” (1 Timothy 5:13). In his second letter to Timothy, Paul warned against depraved persons (possibly including women) who manipulated “weak-willed,” or “gullible,” women (2 Timothy 3:6).
A reading of the entire passage of 1 Timothy 2:9–15 strongly suggests that Paul was giving Timothy advice about dealing with some heretical teachings and practices specifically involving women in the church at Ephesus. The heresy may have been so serious that he had to say about the Ephesian women, “I am not allowing women to teach or have authority over a man.” Other passages show that such exclusion was not normative in Paul’s ministry.
First Timothy 3:1–13 This entire passage has been held by some to confirm that all leaders and authorities in the Early Church were supposed to be males. The passage deals primarily with male leadership, most likely because of majority practice and expectations. But there is also significant support for female leadership.
Typical of modern English versions, the New International Version translates verse 11, “In the same way, their wives are to be women worthy of respect”. The NIV translators arbitrarily decided that the verse refers to the wives of deacons (even though there is no reference in the preceding qualifications of elders to their wives).
However, the word translated “wives” is the plural of the Greek word gyne which can be translated as either “woman” or “wife” depending on the context. Recognizing this, the NIV translators did include the word “deaconesses” as an alternate reading in their footnotes. But the NASB and the NRSV render the plural form of gyne as “women.” Thus, literally, the verse is addressing the qualifications of women in spiritual leadership who, in this context, might easily be called “deacons.”
Although the first-century cultural milieu produced a primarily male church leadership, this passage along with other biblical evidence of female spiritual leadership (e.g., Acts 21:9; Romans 16:1–15 ; Philippians 4:2,3) demonstrates that female leadership was not prohibited, either for Paul’s day or for today. Passages that imply most leaders were male may not be taken to say that all leaders were male, since the biblical record speaks approvingly of numerous female leaders.
Galatians 3:28
Those who oppose allowing women to hold positions of spiritual leadership place contextual limitations on Galatians 3:28, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”
Some interpreters restrict the meaning of this triad to salvation by faith or oneness in Christ. That truth is certainly articulated throughout Scripture. Yet the verse carries a ring of universal application for all our relationships, not just an assurance that anyone can come to Christ. “Neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female”—these are basic relationship principles to which faithful followers of Christ must give highest priority.
The God of the Bible “does not show favoritism” (Romans 2:11; cf. also 2 Samuel 14:14; 2 Chronicles 19:7; Acts 10:34; Ephesians 6:9). He calls whom He will and gives gifts and ministries as He chooses; humans must not put limitations on divine prerogatives. The strained relationship between Adam and Eve, including the statement that “he will rule over you” (Genesis 3:16), comes as a result of the curse, making it clear that this was not a part of God’s original and durable design for humankind. In Christ we are truly set free from sin and its curse, which separate us from God and each other and cause us to elevate or demean according to race, social standing, or gender.


Download: The Role of Women in Ministry (PDF)
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
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Right because there are no qualifications for pastor only elders. Anybody can be a pastor. Raise your hand, get a free college education and a guaranteed job.
If you have a problem with what the Holy Spirit put in His word, take it up with Him.
 
Mar 21, 2009
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No here I'm speaking to heart attitude. If you approach the word of God with unbelief no amount of exegesis is going to bring you to the truth.

Gods word is a always true. The truth of Gods word is not dependent on my believing or understanding of the word.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
God's Word is true. But sometimes people are dull. They make mistakes in interpretation They read into it things that they want it to say and claim God's Word as their authority. Seeking authorial intent (both Paul's and the Holy Spirit, which are the same) is the job of the sincere bible student. I wish you the best in your journey.

I will post more scripture exegesis on the topic over the months to come. I enjoy what I am learning as I dive deeper into the reasons for the various interpretations on these passage about women ministry leadership roles in the scriptures and in the early churches.
 

Lucy-Pevensie

Senior Member
Dec 20, 2017
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You continue to deny the simple truth of scripture. Paul admonished Timothy that the pastor of the church is to be the husband of one wife. Pastors are gifted to the church by God. God will not gift a pastor to the church that does not meet His qualifications. Men will choose for themselves pastors who will tell them what they want to hear.

You are welcome the heretical view of women pastors. Your denomination welcomes women and if they have not already done so will also welcome any others that will teach what the denomination wants taught. Apostacy cannot be choosey except they rule out all who would demand fidelity to the bible. You will be fed a constant diet of unsound doctrine laced with higher criticism of Gods word.

The denominational churches are in open rebellion to Gods word and Gods judgment is due them. Judgment begins at the house of God. God understands unsaved people will not seek righteousness.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
Can you tell the difference between these 2 statements?

1 Christian men should have only one wife rather than a hareem.

2 Christian men must be married.

Your comments on this issue have demonstrated a religious blindness which leads me to suspect you cannot.
 
Oct 19, 2020
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Probably about a hundred years ago. They have undermined the sovereignty of Gods word for a very long time.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

This would have to be according to interpretation and Teaching. So where at in their teaching do you find this denouncement?
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
17,206
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Probably about a hundred years ago. They have undermined the sovereignty of Gods word for a very long time.

For the cause of Christ
Roger
You can't substantiate your assertions, so you double down on them. That's not the product of wisdom.