Where in scripture are instructions to cancel the feasts?

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Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
2,142
662
113
#1
Scripture clearly tells us that we are to be guided by the Holy Spirit, not by the fleshly commands of fleshly circumcision or special diet. It explains why God did this. I don’t find the commands for cancelling the Sabbath or the feasts. These instructions are about worship and praising God very different from what circumcision and diet are about.

I studied history to discover when and how these cancellations came about. I searched information from the dead sea scrolls as well as established ancient history as Harvard and Yale teaches it. I found that it is probable that these decisions were based on what was happening in the secular world at that time rather than scripture teaching.

History tells us that when the Jews rebelled against Rome in 70 and 132 the Romans killed so many Jerusalem Jews the blood ran in the streets. Before this the Jews headed the Christian church councils, men like James the earthly brother of Jesus. They only had the OT, and the Jews knew it well, the gentiles didn’t. The gentile church heads were familiar with their pagan worship and they only changed gods, keeping a lot of their customs like Sunday church. They felt God wanted them to oppose Jews who denied Christ, they were against anything Jewish.

Adding to this was enmity between Christian Jews and those who denied Christ because Bar Kokbha who headed the revolt of 132 was said to be the messiah. They did not want to join ones who thought this, even to oppose Roman rule. When they would not help in the war, the Jews became angry at the Christian Jews.

For over 300 years these ideas influenced the church and there were many diverse ideas written about. There was no central council, no unification. Then came an Emperor of Rome (Constantine) who made Christianity the official religion, changing from pagan worship. He wanted a united Christianity, a central ruling council. The people of the church were called to meet. From this council meeting we have the Apostles’ Creed, and the church was unified. But along with this came the idea of the Jews having such wrong ideas everything they did must be opposed. Even Passover was tossed out, they said their Easter they created replaced it.

I think it is time we take a closer look at the policies they established. The idea of scripture telling us not to be led in worship by the seasons like the pagans do as a reason it means to cancel Sabbath on the last day of the week instead of the first, or that Mary discovered Christ had risen these or that Mary established Sunday because she discovered on Sunday morning that Christ had risen during the night has been thoroughly disproved as reasons, so let’s not go over that dead end again. Something so important as these cancellations would have been made clear in scripture like circumcision and diet has. Where are these instructions?

 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
28,711
7,205
113
#2
In the Hebrew Scriptures, the Jewish prophet Amos records that God declared He would do nothing without first revealing it to His servants, the prophets (Amos 3:7). From the Old Covenant to the New, Genesis to Revelation, God provides picture after picture of His entire plan for mankind and one of the most startling prophetic pictures is outlined for us in the Jewish feasts of Leviticus 23.

The Hebrew word for “feasts” (moadim) literally means "appointed times." God has carefully planned and orchestrated the timing and sequence of each of these seven feasts to reveal to us a special story. The seven annual feasts of Israel were spread over seven months of the Jewish calendar, at set times appointed by God. They are still celebrated by observant Jews today. But for both Jews and non-Jews who have placed their faith in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, these special days demonstrate the work of redemption through God’s Son.

The first four of the seven feasts occur during the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they all have already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament. The final three holidays (Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) occur during the fall, all within a short fifteen-day period.

Many Bible scholars and commentators believe that these fall feasts have not yet been fulfilled by Jesus. However, the “blessed hope” (Titus 2:13) for all believers in Jesus Christ is that they most assuredly will be fulfilled. As the four spring feasts were fulfilled literally and right on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, these three fall feasts, it is believed by many, will likewise be fulfilled literally in connection to the Lord’s second coming.

In a nutshell, here is the prophetic significance of each of the seven Levitical feasts of Israel:

1) Passover (Leviticus 23:5) – Pointed to the Messiah as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7) whose blood would be shed for our sins. Jesus was crucified during the time that the Passover was observed (Mark 14:12). Christ is a “lamb without blemish or defect” (1 Peter 1:19) because His life was completely free from sin (Hebrews 4:15). As the first Passover marked the Hebrews’ release from Egyptian slavery, so the death of Christ marks our release from the slavery of sin (Romans 8:2).

2) Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:6) – Pointed to the Messiah’s sinless life (as leaven is a picture of sin in the Bible), making Him the perfect sacrifice for our sins. Jesus’ body was in the grave during the first days of this feast, like a kernel of wheat planted and waiting to burst forth as the bread of life.

3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Pointed to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous. Jesus was resurrected on this very day, which is one of the reasons that Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the "first fruits from the dead."

4) Weeks or Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16) – Occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and pointed to the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jew and Gentile, who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age (see Acts 2). The Church was actually established on this day when God poured out His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews responded to Peter’s great sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel.

5) Trumpets (Leviticus 23:24) – The first of the fall feasts. Many believe this day points to the Rapture of the Church when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the heavens as He comes for His bride, the Church. The Rapture is always associated in Scripture with the blowing of a loud trumpet (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).

6) Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) – Many believe this prophetically points to the day of the Second Coming of Jesus when He will return to earth. That will be the Day of Atonement for the Jewish remnant when they "look upon Him whom they have pierced," repent of their sins, and receive Him as their Messiah (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).

7) Tabernacles or Booths (Leviticus 23:34) – Many scholars believe that this feast day points to the Lord’s promise that He will once again “tabernacle” with His people when He returns to reign over all the world (Micah 4:1-7).

Should Christians celebrate these Levitical feast days of Israel today? Whether or not a Christian celebrates the Jewish feast days would be a matter of conscience for the individual Christian. Colossians 2:16-17 tells us, “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” Christians are not bound to observe the Jewish feasts the way an Old Testament Jew was, but we should not criticize another believer who does or does not observe these special days and feasts (Romans 14:5).

While it is not required for Christians to celebrate the Jewish feast days, it is beneficial to study them. Certainly, it could be beneficial to celebrate these days if it leads one to a greater understanding and appreciation for Christ’s death and resurrection and the future promise of His coming. As Christians, if we choose to celebrate these special days, we should put Christ in the center of the celebration, as the One who came to fulfill the prophetic significance of each of them. source
 

pottersclay

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2015
3,732
665
113
#3
In the Hebrew Scriptures, the Jewish prophet Amos records that God declared He would do nothing without first revealing it to His servants, the prophets (Amos 3:7). From the Old Covenant to the New, Genesis to Revelation, God provides picture after picture of His entire plan for mankind and one of the most startling prophetic pictures is outlined for us in the Jewish feasts of Leviticus 23.

The Hebrew word for “feasts” (moadim) literally means "appointed times." God has carefully planned and orchestrated the timing and sequence of each of these seven feasts to reveal to us a special story. The seven annual feasts of Israel were spread over seven months of the Jewish calendar, at set times appointed by God. They are still celebrated by observant Jews today. But for both Jews and non-Jews who have placed their faith in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, these special days demonstrate the work of redemption through God’s Son.

The first four of the seven feasts occur during the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they all have already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament. The final three holidays (Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) occur during the fall, all within a short fifteen-day period.

Many Bible scholars and commentators believe that these fall feasts have not yet been fulfilled by Jesus. However, the “blessed hope” (Titus 2:13) for all believers in Jesus Christ is that they most assuredly will be fulfilled. As the four spring feasts were fulfilled literally and right on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, these three fall feasts, it is believed by many, will likewise be fulfilled literally in connection to the Lord’s second coming.

In a nutshell, here is the prophetic significance of each of the seven Levitical feasts of Israel:

1) Passover (Leviticus 23:5) – Pointed to the Messiah as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7) whose blood would be shed for our sins. Jesus was crucified during the time that the Passover was observed (Mark 14:12). Christ is a “lamb without blemish or defect” (1 Peter 1:19) because His life was completely free from sin (Hebrews 4:15). As the first Passover marked the Hebrews’ release from Egyptian slavery, so the death of Christ marks our release from the slavery of sin (Romans 8:2).

2) Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:6) – Pointed to the Messiah’s sinless life (as leaven is a picture of sin in the Bible), making Him the perfect sacrifice for our sins. Jesus’ body was in the grave during the first days of this feast, like a kernel of wheat planted and waiting to burst forth as the bread of life.

3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Pointed to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous. Jesus was resurrected on this very day, which is one of the reasons that Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the "first fruits from the dead."

4) Weeks or Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16) – Occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and pointed to the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jew and Gentile, who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age (see Acts 2). The Church was actually established on this day when God poured out His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews responded to Peter’s great sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel.

5) Trumpets (Leviticus 23:24) – The first of the fall feasts. Many believe this day points to the Rapture of the Church when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the heavens as He comes for His bride, the Church. The Rapture is always associated in Scripture with the blowing of a loud trumpet (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).

6) Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) – Many believe this prophetically points to the day of the Second Coming of Jesus when He will return to earth. That will be the Day of Atonement for the Jewish remnant when they "look upon Him whom they have pierced," repent of their sins, and receive Him as their Messiah (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).

7) Tabernacles or Booths (Leviticus 23:34) – Many scholars believe that this feast day points to the Lord’s promise that He will once again “tabernacle” with His people when He returns to reign over all the world (Micah 4:1-7).

Should Christians celebrate these Levitical feast days of Israel today? Whether or not a Christian celebrates the Jewish feast days would be a matter of conscience for the individual Christian. Colossians 2:16-17 tells us, “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” Christians are not bound to observe the Jewish feasts the way an Old Testament Jew was, but we should not criticize another believer who does or does not observe these special days and feasts (Romans 14:5).

While it is not required for Christians to celebrate the Jewish feast days, it is beneficial to study them. Certainly, it could be beneficial to celebrate these days if it leads one to a greater understanding and appreciation for Christ’s death and resurrection and the future promise of His coming. As Christians, if we choose to celebrate these special days, we should put Christ in the center of the celebration, as the One who came to fulfill the prophetic significance of each of them. source
Very well said...😀😀😀
 

Jimbone

Senior Member
Aug 22, 2014
2,138
537
113
40
#4
Scripture clearly tells us that we are to be guided by the Holy Spirit, not by the fleshly commands of fleshly circumcision or special diet. It explains why God did this. I don’t find the commands for cancelling the Sabbath or the feasts. These instructions are about worship and praising God very different from what circumcision and diet are about.

I studied history to discover when and how these cancellations came about. I searched information from the dead sea scrolls as well as established ancient history as Harvard and Yale teaches it. I found that it is probable that these decisions were based on what was happening in the secular world at that time rather than scripture teaching.

History tells us that when the Jews rebelled against Rome in 70 and 132 the Romans killed so many Jerusalem Jews the blood ran in the streets. Before this the Jews headed the Christian church councils, men like James the earthly brother of Jesus. They only had the OT, and the Jews knew it well, the gentiles didn’t. The gentile church heads were familiar with their pagan worship and they only changed gods, keeping a lot of their customs like Sunday church. They felt God wanted them to oppose Jews who denied Christ, they were against anything Jewish.

Adding to this was enmity between Christian Jews and those who denied Christ because Bar Kokbha who headed the revolt of 132 was said to be the messiah. They did not want to join ones who thought this, even to oppose Roman rule. When they would not help in the war, the Jews became angry at the Christian Jews.

For over 300 years these ideas influenced the church and there were many diverse ideas written about. There was no central council, no unification. Then came an Emperor of Rome (Constantine) who made Christianity the official religion, changing from pagan worship. He wanted a united Christianity, a central ruling council. The people of the church were called to meet. From this council meeting we have the Apostles’ Creed, and the church was unified. But along with this came the idea of the Jews having such wrong ideas everything they did must be opposed. Even Passover was tossed out, they said their Easter they created replaced it.

I think it is time we take a closer look at the policies they established. The idea of scripture telling us not to be led in worship by the seasons like the pagans do as a reason it means to cancel Sabbath on the last day of the week instead of the first, or that Mary discovered Christ had risen these or that Mary established Sunday because she discovered on Sunday morning that Christ had risen during the night has been thoroughly disproved as reasons, so let’s not go over that dead end again. Something so important as these cancellations would have been made clear in scripture like circumcision and diet has. Where are these instructions?

Well Romans 14 lays it out very well. I think. It sums it all right on up.

1 As for the one who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions. 2 One person believes he may eat anything, while the weak person eats only vegetables. 3 Let not the one who eats despise the one who abstains, and let not the one who abstains pass judgment on the one who eats, for God has welcomed him. 4 Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own master that he stands or falls. And he will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make him stand.

5 One person esteems one day as better than another, while another esteems all days alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind. 6 The one who observes the day, observes it in honor of the Lord. The one who eats, eats in honor of the Lord, since he gives thanks to God, while the one who abstains, abstains in honor of the Lord and gives thanks to God. 7 For none of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself. 8 For if we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord. So then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s. 9 For to this end Christ died and lived again, that he might be Lord both of the dead and of the living.

10 Why do you pass judgment on your brother? Or you, why do you despise your brother? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God; 11 for it is written,

“As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,
and every tongue shall confess to God.”

12 So then each of us will give an account of himself to God.

Do Not Cause Another to Stumble

13 Therefore let us not pass judgment on one another any longer, but rather decide never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of a brother. 14 I know and am persuaded in the Lord Jesus that nothing is unclean in itself, but it is unclean for anyone who thinks it unclean. 15 For if your brother is grieved by what you eat, you are no longer walking in love. By what you eat, do not destroy the one for whom Christ died. 16 So do not let what you regard as good be spoken of as evil. 17 For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking but of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. 18 Whoever thus serves Christ is acceptable to God and approved by men. 19 So then let us pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

20 Do not, for the sake of food, destroy the work of God. Everything is indeed clean, but it is wrong for anyone to make another stumble by what he eats. 21 It is good not to eat meat or drink wine or do anything that causes your brother to stumble.c 22 The faith that you have, keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the one who has no reason to pass judgment on himself for what he approves. 23 But whoever has doubts is condemned if he eats, because the eating is not from faith. For whatever does not proceed from faith is sin.d
 

posthuman

Senior Member
Jul 31, 2013
26,345
7,462
113
#5
If you observe a feast without giving the sacrifices the law commands as part of the observation of that feast, how can you say that you are keeping it according to the law?

How is this different from congregation on the 8th day, since doing so is often argued as being evil - some even claim it is the mark of the beast - on the basis that it isn't according to the letter of that same law?



((not accusing anyone - just hoping to find a clear logic))
 
Jan 29, 2020
93
28
18
#6
Col 2:16 Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days:
Col 2:17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.

Ti's very sad when the Birth, Death and Resurrection of our Lord and Saviour seems to matter not. So little value placed on the Son of God . The OT was the shadow of , the foretelling of the Christ .

Heb 1:1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,
Heb 1:2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;
 

crossnote

Senior Member
Nov 24, 2012
28,038
2,176
113
#7
Hebrews 8:13 NKJV
. [13] In that He says, "A new covenant," He has made the first obsolete. Now what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away.
 

Locoponydirtman

Well-known member
Oct 9, 2018
2,652
1,621
113
Texas
#8
In the Hebrew Scriptures, the Jewish prophet Amos records that God declared He would do nothing without first revealing it to His servants, the prophets (Amos 3:7). From the Old Covenant to the New, Genesis to Revelation, God provides picture after picture of His entire plan for mankind and one of the most startling prophetic pictures is outlined for us in the Jewish feasts of Leviticus 23.

The Hebrew word for “feasts” (moadim) literally means "appointed times." God has carefully planned and orchestrated the timing and sequence of each of these seven feasts to reveal to us a special story. The seven annual feasts of Israel were spread over seven months of the Jewish calendar, at set times appointed by God. They are still celebrated by observant Jews today. But for both Jews and non-Jews who have placed their faith in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, these special days demonstrate the work of redemption through God’s Son.

The first four of the seven feasts occur during the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they all have already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament. The final three holidays (Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) occur during the fall, all within a short fifteen-day period.

Many Bible scholars and commentators believe that these fall feasts have not yet been fulfilled by Jesus. However, the “blessed hope” (Titus 2:13) for all believers in Jesus Christ is that they most assuredly will be fulfilled. As the four spring feasts were fulfilled literally and right on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, these three fall feasts, it is believed by many, will likewise be fulfilled literally in connection to the Lord’s second coming.

In a nutshell, here is the prophetic significance of each of the seven Levitical feasts of Israel:

1) Passover (Leviticus 23:5) – Pointed to the Messiah as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7) whose blood would be shed for our sins. Jesus was crucified during the time that the Passover was observed (Mark 14:12). Christ is a “lamb without blemish or defect” (1 Peter 1:19) because His life was completely free from sin (Hebrews 4:15). As the first Passover marked the Hebrews’ release from Egyptian slavery, so the death of Christ marks our release from the slavery of sin (Romans 8:2).

2) Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:6) – Pointed to the Messiah’s sinless life (as leaven is a picture of sin in the Bible), making Him the perfect sacrifice for our sins. Jesus’ body was in the grave during the first days of this feast, like a kernel of wheat planted and waiting to burst forth as the bread of life.

3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Pointed to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous. Jesus was resurrected on this very day, which is one of the reasons that Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the "first fruits from the dead."

4) Weeks or Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16) – Occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and pointed to the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jew and Gentile, who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age (see Acts 2). The Church was actually established on this day when God poured out His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews responded to Peter’s great sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel.

5) Trumpets (Leviticus 23:24) – The first of the fall feasts. Many believe this day points to the Rapture of the Church when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the heavens as He comes for His bride, the Church. The Rapture is always associated in Scripture with the blowing of a loud trumpet (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).

6) Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) – Many believe this prophetically points to the day of the Second Coming of Jesus when He will return to earth. That will be the Day of Atonement for the Jewish remnant when they "look upon Him whom they have pierced," repent of their sins, and receive Him as their Messiah (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).

7) Tabernacles or Booths (Leviticus 23:34) – Many scholars believe that this feast day points to the Lord’s promise that He will once again “tabernacle” with His people when He returns to reign over all the world (Micah 4:1-7).

Should Christians celebrate these Levitical feast days of Israel today? Whether or not a Christian celebrates the Jewish feast days would be a matter of conscience for the individual Christian. Colossians 2:16-17 tells us, “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” Christians are not bound to observe the Jewish feasts the way an Old Testament Jew was, but we should not criticize another believer who does or does not observe these special days and feasts (Romans 14:5).

While it is not required for Christians to celebrate the Jewish feast days, it is beneficial to study them. Certainly, it could be beneficial to celebrate these days if it leads one to a greater understanding and appreciation for Christ’s death and resurrection and the future promise of His coming. As Christians, if we choose to celebrate these special days, we should put Christ in the center of the celebration, as the One who came to fulfill the prophetic significance of each of them. source
I love this answer.
Thanks for doing the work here.
It seems that we can not point to these passages enough.
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
10,558
4,050
113
#9
Where in scripture are instructions to cancel the feasts?
Where in Scripture are instructions to have the temple destroyed by Romans? Do you see the connection between the temple and the feasts? And the connection between a destroyed temple and canceled feasts? Or should you be doing a careful study of Leviticus first?
 

posthuman

Senior Member
Jul 31, 2013
26,345
7,462
113
#10
Will Christ return for us on one of these 7 feast days?
And other significant days to come which were prophesied - will they correlate with the feasts?
 

Jimbone

Senior Member
Aug 22, 2014
2,138
537
113
40
#11
Will Christ return for us on one of these 7 feast days?
And other significant days to come which were prophesied - will they correlate with the feasts?
Awesome way to point out a HUGE problem with believing all these things aren't fulfilled. That the judgement didn't already come, and that we still need a temple, these things are finished for ALL time. If these things didn't happen when Gods temple was on earth then it's all false unless scripture is still open. This is a HUGE whole in the word of God when you believe in a coming 3rd temple.
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
2,142
662
113
#12
In the Hebrew Scriptures, the Jewish prophet Amos records that God declared He would do nothing without first revealing it to His servants, the prophets (Amos 3:7). From the Old Covenant to the New, Genesis to Revelation, God provides picture after picture of His entire plan for mankind and one of the most startling prophetic pictures is outlined for us in the Jewish feasts of Leviticus 23.

The Hebrew word for “feasts” (moadim) literally means "appointed times." God has carefully planned and orchestrated the timing and sequence of each of these seven feasts to reveal to us a special story. The seven annual feasts of Israel were spread over seven months of the Jewish calendar, at set times appointed by God. They are still celebrated by observant Jews today. But for both Jews and non-Jews who have placed their faith in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, these special days demonstrate the work of redemption through God’s Son.

The first four of the seven feasts occur during the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they all have already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament. The final three holidays (Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) occur during the fall, all within a short fifteen-day period.

Many Bible scholars and commentators believe that these fall feasts have not yet been fulfilled by Jesus. However, the “blessed hope” (Titus 2:13) for all believers in Jesus Christ is that they most assuredly will be fulfilled. As the four spring feasts were fulfilled literally and right on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, these three fall feasts, it is believed by many, will likewise be fulfilled literally in connection to the Lord’s second coming.

In a nutshell, here is the prophetic significance of each of the seven Levitical feasts of Israel:

1) Passover (Leviticus 23:5) – Pointed to the Messiah as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7) whose blood would be shed for our sins. Jesus was crucified during the time that the Passover was observed (Mark 14:12). Christ is a “lamb without blemish or defect” (1 Peter 1:19) because His life was completely free from sin (Hebrews 4:15). As the first Passover marked the Hebrews’ release from Egyptian slavery, so the death of Christ marks our release from the slavery of sin (Romans 8:2).

2) Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:6) – Pointed to the Messiah’s sinless life (as leaven is a picture of sin in the Bible), making Him the perfect sacrifice for our sins. Jesus’ body was in the grave during the first days of this feast, like a kernel of wheat planted and waiting to burst forth as the bread of life.

3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Pointed to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous. Jesus was resurrected on this very day, which is one of the reasons that Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the "first fruits from the dead."

4) Weeks or Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16) – Occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and pointed to the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jew and Gentile, who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age (see Acts 2). The Church was actually established on this day when God poured out His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews responded to Peter’s great sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel.

5) Trumpets (Leviticus 23:24) – The first of the fall feasts. Many believe this day points to the Rapture of the Church when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the heavens as He comes for His bride, the Church. The Rapture is always associated in Scripture with the blowing of a loud trumpet (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).

6) Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) – Many believe this prophetically points to the day of the Second Coming of Jesus when He will return to earth. That will be the Day of Atonement for the Jewish remnant when they "look upon Him whom they have pierced," repent of their sins, and receive Him as their Messiah (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).

7) Tabernacles or Booths (Leviticus 23:34) – Many scholars believe that this feast day points to the Lord’s promise that He will once again “tabernacle” with His people when He returns to reign over all the world (Micah 4:1-7).

Should Christians celebrate these Levitical feast days of Israel today? Whether or not a Christian celebrates the Jewish feast days would be a matter of conscience for the individual Christian. Colossians 2:16-17 tells us, “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” Christians are not bound to observe the Jewish feasts the way an Old Testament Jew was, but we should not criticize another believer who does or does not observe these special days and feasts (Romans 14:5).

While it is not required for Christians to celebrate the Jewish feast days, it is beneficial to study them. Certainly, it could be beneficial to celebrate these days if it leads one to a greater understanding and appreciation for Christ’s death and resurrection and the future promise of His coming. As Christians, if we choose to celebrate these special days, we should put Christ in the center of the celebration, as the One who came to fulfill the prophetic significance of each of them. source
This is an absolutely marvelous post, and it agrees with my understanding of the feasts except Pentecost. That is celebrating the day God's law was written down on stone, and it is now that law is written in our hearts.

We disagree about the need for us to praise God and celebrate His giving us salvation with the feasts. You say that because of the one scripture telling us not to judge others about celebrating dates what God actually did with that was to cancel what God told us about celebrating salvation with the feasts. That is one interpretation of one scripture, something no other scripture does. Always there are two scriptures with the same message because it is so difficult for our carnal minds to grasp spiritual teaching. I don't think God told us this meaning to not celebrate His plan of salvation for us.
 

7seasrekeyed

Senior Member
Aug 27, 2017
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#13
Scripture clearly tells us that we are to be guided by the Holy Spirit, not by the fleshly commands of fleshly circumcision or special diet. It explains why God did this. I don’t find the commands for cancelling the Sabbath or the feasts. These instructions are about worship and praising God very different from what circumcision and diet are about.

I studied history to discover when and how these cancellations came about. I searched information from the dead sea scrolls as well as established ancient history as Harvard and Yale teaches it. I found that it is probable that these decisions were based on what was happening in the secular world at that time rather than scripture teaching.

History tells us that when the Jews rebelled against Rome in 70 and 132 the Romans killed so many Jerusalem Jews the blood ran in the streets. Before this the Jews headed the Christian church councils, men like James the earthly brother of Jesus. They only had the OT, and the Jews knew it well, the gentiles didn’t. The gentile church heads were familiar with their pagan worship and they only changed gods, keeping a lot of their customs like Sunday church. They felt God wanted them to oppose Jews who denied Christ, they were against anything Jewish.

Adding to this was enmity between Christian Jews and those who denied Christ because Bar Kokbha who headed the revolt of 132 was said to be the messiah. They did not want to join ones who thought this, even to oppose Roman rule. When they would not help in the war, the Jews became angry at the Christian Jews.

For over 300 years these ideas influenced the church and there were many diverse ideas written about. There was no central council, no unification. Then came an Emperor of Rome (Constantine) who made Christianity the official religion, changing from pagan worship. He wanted a united Christianity, a central ruling council. The people of the church were called to meet. From this council meeting we have the Apostles’ Creed, and the church was unified. But along with this came the idea of the Jews having such wrong ideas everything they did must be opposed. Even Passover was tossed out, they said their Easter they created replaced it.

I think it is time we take a closer look at the policies they established. The idea of scripture telling us not to be led in worship by the seasons like the pagans do as a reason it means to cancel Sabbath on the last day of the week instead of the first, or that Mary discovered Christ had risen these or that Mary established Sunday because she discovered on Sunday morning that Christ had risen during the night has been thoroughly disproved as reasons, so let’s not go over that dead end again. Something so important as these cancellations would have been made clear in scripture like circumcision and diet has. Where are these instructions?


so should we listen to your accumulative studies or to Paul whose writings are in scripture?

everything you have written above is you being influenced by what you have read and or studied while scripture tells us something completely different

here is a repost from Reba1, a new member here who tells us what scripture states:

Col 2:16 Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holy day, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days:
Col 2:17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.

Ti's very sad when the Birth, Death and Resurrection of our Lord and Savior seems to matter not. So little value placed on the Son of God . The OT was the shadow of , the foretelling of the Christ .

Heb 1:1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,
Heb 1:2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;

so in answer to the op's question,
Where are these instructions?
, in the Bible.

let me repeat: the instructions are in the Bible
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
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#14
Will Christ return for us on one of these 7 feast days?
And other significant days to come which were prophesied - will they correlate with the feasts?
God is eternal and His eternal ways do not change. Every step to our salvation was celebrated with a feast, and each celebration of those that have occurred, the first four feasts, happened on the day of the feast. This is the pattern that God follows, if the day Christ returns does not happen on the day of the unknown year it will happen then God will have broken a routine for the first time.
 

7seasrekeyed

Senior Member
Aug 27, 2017
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#15
I love this answer.
Thanks for doing the work here.
It seems that we can not point to these passages enough.

she didn't do the work

it is sourced from 'Got Questions'

you might note the itsy bitsy source that is highlighted at the end of her post?

I am mentioning it because the title to the article was left out and it is actually important.

here it is:

How did Jesus fulfill the meanings of the Jewish feasts?

the article is illustrating why we do not have to keep the feasts


SOURCE
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
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#16
so should we listen to your accumulative studies or to Paul whose writings are in scripture?

everything you have written above is you being influenced by what you have read and or studied while scripture tells us something completely different

here is a repost from Reba1, a new member here who tells us what scripture states:

Col 2:16 Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holy day, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days:
Col 2:17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.


Ti's very sad when the Birth, Death and Resurrection of our Lord and Savior seems to matter not. So little value placed on the Son of God . The OT was the shadow of , the foretelling of the Christ .

Heb 1:1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,
Heb 1:2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;


so in answer to the op's question, , in the Bible.

let me repeat: the instructions are in the Bible
God is real and everything God tells us, including using Paul to tell us, is real. That means that God rules our secular world. You seem to think they are separate, that God isn't in our secular world, but God is.

I pointed out that men used carnal thinking to decide on their spiritual life, and that is not right. God is to lead us, not the secular world.
 

Dino246

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2015
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#17
God is eternal and His eternal ways do not change.
Agreed.

So... because God's ways did not change when He gave the Law at Mt. Sinai, why would you think that His ways changed at the completion of the Law, when all things are fulfilled such that the old covenant has been set aside, as Scripture tells us it has?

In other words, your statement is a red herring.
 

Blik

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2016
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#18
she didn't do the work

it is sourced from 'Got Questions'

you might note the itsy bitsy source that is highlighted at the end of her post?

I am mentioning it because the title to the article was left out and it is actually important.

here it is:

How did Jesus fulfill the meanings of the Jewish feasts?

the article is illustrating why we do not have to keep the feasts


SOURCE
When we honor the feast days it has absolutely nothing to do with any fulfillment, it is celebrating the salvation that God has given us.
 

7seasrekeyed

Senior Member
Aug 27, 2017
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#19
we can conclude that the feasts, law etc was fulfilled and therefore not actually cancelled

yet the fact remains that Christians...those who believe Christ fulfilled the law and died, bearing our sins in our place, do not have to observe the law and the feast days as prescribed to the Jewish nation and given to them in the wilderness with Moses as go between for God

we no longer need a go between. or mediator. our mediator is Christ

it seems to me the entire point of Christ's death on our behalf was to do away with the old system and begin a new system where we can now have a relationship with our Creator which is what He wanted in the first place
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
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#20
it was clearly understood that in 1st. cent. Judaism that the 'letter of the law could not always be kept -
a good example is that in many of the sacrifices and especially the 'sprinkling of the blood' on the
'Ark of the Covenant', on the day of Atonement could not be done, simple because there was not
an ARK at the Time because it had been taken away in the Babylonia captivity...
so,
what they did, was they sprinkled the blood on the 'floor' of the Holy of Holies, and so,
the general principle was, if they could not keep the exact letter of the Law, that they would
do the very best that they could with the circumstances at hand...
and they also understood that the blood of the goat or a lamb sprinkled upon a piece of metal
had 'no power at all' IF NOT ACCOMPAMIED with TRUST IN YESHUA and OBIENDIENCE from the HEART'...