Christians Celebrating Purim

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Aug 31, 2017
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#1
If you do, as a Christian, how do you celebrate Purim within your family?
I know it is NOT a requirement, but it is something that we would enjoy doing.
I'm just wondering how you celebrate it with your family?

Thank you,
Freckley
 

mcubed

Senior Member
Dec 20, 2013
1,266
86
48
#2
Why would a non-Jew celebrate it? How many non Jews know about when Haman lost we Jews got to fight back because of King Xerxes and Esther whom G-d used to persuade the king yet He never mentioned Himself throughout the whole book. Do non Jews celebrate it? ... they do not celebrate to the "BIG" ones, Passover, Yom Kippur... the Holy Holidays G-d says specifically shall LIVE FOREVER!!!!....
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
23,391
1,333
113
#3
Purim is not one of the seven feast days established by God.
 
Aug 31, 2017
36
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#4
mcubed,
I believe Esther has a beautiful message to celebrate. It speaks of a God who is always there even when we do not feel Him. It speaks to God's nature. Things may be hidden now, but there comes a day when all secrets shall be revealed and all truth spoken. It speaks of a God who will keep His promises to His people, saving them if they will turn to Him and rely on Him. Esther is a story of a God who is always working and weaving His story. One day, we as Christians will again be fighting for our lives. I want my children to remember a time when God's people was facing annihilation. They turned to Him and He saved them and He will do the same for my children. It may not be a physical saving, but if they keep their eyes on Him, they will be saved.

As far as the other holy days, this is our first year celebrating any of them. Purim just happens to be the first Biblical holiday to come about since we have decided to go this route. I'm not looking to cross off an item on a list of works. This is something that we are choosing, that we know is not a command, but want to use to honor God and the memory of His works and to remind us of His interactions with us today and in the future. I don't believe there is anything wrong with that.

Thank you for your reply,
Freckley
 

Ugly

Senior Member
Apr 19, 2011
20,509
514
113
#5
If someone wants to do it and it is not ungodly or something they feel they do out of religious obligation then why get on their case about a choice they flatly said was something they Enjoy?
 

notuptome

Senior Member
May 17, 2013
11,342
375
83
#6
Purim is where Jews drink to become drunk enough to forget Haman. They cheer Mordecai and boo Haman when they read the book of Esther.

Esther is a unique book. The king of Persia Ahasuerus was a drunk. He made epic decisions while drunk.

The feast of Purim is a result of Mordecai declaring it at the end of the book of Esther. Esther 9:20

For the cause of Christ
Roger
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
7,456
298
83
#7
epic decisions have been made over centuries, under various intoxicants,
whether physical or 'spiritual'...:)
 

Nehemiah6

Senior Member
Jul 18, 2017
5,463
392
83
#8
If you do, as a Christian, how do you celebrate Purim within your family?
I know it is NOT a requirement, but it is something that we would enjoy doing.
I'm just wondering how you celebrate it with your family?

Thank you,
Freckley
Since Christians do not celebrate Purim, you should get in touch with Jews who do. They will provide you with full details.
 

Depleted

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2015
22,166
480
83
Philly, PA, USA
#9
If you do, as a Christian, how do you celebrate Purim within your family?
I know it is NOT a requirement, but it is something that we would enjoy doing.
I'm just wondering how you celebrate it with your family?

Thank you,
Freckley
Five pounds of Pur, two pounds of Im, seven cloves of garlic...

And can you tell I don't have a clue? Sorry, can't help you, but I did get a kick out of where my mind went with this one.
 

Oncefallen

Idiot in Chief
Staff member
Jan 15, 2011
4,821
326
83
#11
Do non Jews celebrate it? ... they do not celebrate to the "BIG" ones, Passover, Yom Kippur... the Holy Holidays G-d says specifically shall LIVE FOREVER!!!!....
Each of the High Holy days given to Israel by God in the Levitical law do live forever whether ANYONE celebrates them anymore. Each of those celebrations points to Christ and is celebrated in our worship of Him.
 

Depleted

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2015
22,166
480
83
Philly, PA, USA
#13
ESTER 9:32.

read and learn'...
I read, but didn't learn.

Honestly, I came back to this post in hopes someone knew how to do Purim. I was hoping to learn.

Best I got out of it is swap meals with each other and give to the poor. Hard to swap meals if you're the only one in the area to be doing this. And giving to the poor seems like it shouldn't just happen in those two days.
 

Dude653

Senior Member
Mar 19, 2011
7,865
81
0
#14
Feast of Purim is a biblical holiday so someone chooses to celebrate it I'm not seeing the problem here
 

oldethennew

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
7,456
298
83
#15
true Christians should be adhering to and obeying what their Saviour and His disciples did,
when He was still among them and after He had risen - but of course this would be a
matter of conviction and priority for each and every one...
 

Ariel82

Senior Member
Aug 8, 2011
16,931
428
83
#16
If you do, as a Christian, how do you celebrate Purim within your family?
I know it is NOT a requirement, but it is something that we would enjoy doing.
I'm just wondering how you celebrate it with your family?

Thank you,
Freckley
I have never celebrated myself but a friend invited me to a Messianic Jewish congregation. They said it's a festival mostly for kids....they will have a dress in "Biblical times" costume contest, games, songs etc for kids, reading of Esther and other Jewish traditions...sounds like fun, might take my family but haven't decided yet.
 
Aug 31, 2017
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#17
Thank you to everyone who has replied. I have done a lot of research, and we are going to do the following:

We don't have a whole lot, and we give as God moves us, but we would still like to give something. My daughters have a love for the homeless, so we are going to give two $20 gifts to some homeless people we know (from seeing them around). It's not enough just to give, so we will also be sharing God's love for them and asking to pray for them.

I do plan on getting the girls their own 50 cent pieces just for fun.

We have put together a menu plan, which was not that easy seeing as how we also eat a Paleo diet. (No grains, dairy, etc.) We will be making baskets with an entire meal for my brother (who just got out of the military and is having trouble finding a job) and a co-worker (that seems to hate me) whose father has recently passed.

We will each be fasting for three days prior to Purim to draw near to God. The girls will not be fasting food, but electronics.

We will also be reading Esther, doing a few crafts relating to the book of Esther, and playing some "games" that teach about steadfastness, hospitality, courageousness, and obedience to God.

Later we will conclude Purim by either watching One Night with the King or The Book of Esther.

Ours will probably be a lot more laid back than most, but I really just want to use it to teach the girls that God is always there... even when we don't see Him moving. I want to teach them about a time when a girl became a princess and even then was still afraid to do what was right. However, God gave her the strength to be courageous and used her to save many, many people.
 

stand2

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2017
288
19
0
#18
Thank you to everyone who has replied. I have done a lot of research, and we are going to do the following:

We don't have a whole lot, and we give as God moves us, but we would still like to give something. My daughters have a love for the homeless, so we are going to give two $20 gifts to some homeless people we know (from seeing them around). It's not enough just to give, so we will also be sharing God's love for them and asking to pray for them.

I do plan on getting the girls their own 50 cent pieces just for fun.

We have put together a menu plan, which was not that easy seeing as how we also eat a Paleo diet. (No grains, dairy, etc.) We will be making baskets with an entire meal for my brother (who just got out of the military and is having trouble finding a job) and a co-worker (that seems to hate me) whose father has recently passed.

We will each be fasting for three days prior to Purim to draw near to God. The girls will not be fasting food, but electronics.

We will also be reading Esther, doing a few crafts relating to the book of Esther, and playing some "games" that teach about steadfastness, hospitality, courageousness, and obedience to God.

Later we will conclude Purim by either watching One Night with the King or The Book of Esther.

Ours will probably be a lot more laid back than most, but I really just want to use it to teach the girls that God is always there... even when we don't see Him moving. I want to teach them about a time when a girl became a princess and even then was still afraid to do what was right. However, God gave her the strength to be courageous and used her to save many, many people.
If your words don't inspire us to at least teach our children a basic knowledge of God, then I don't know what would. You are a blessing to your children and others around you......may God richly bless you......AMEN....................Stan
 

Depleted

Senior Member
Dec 13, 2015
22,166
480
83
Philly, PA, USA
#19
Thank you to everyone who has replied. I have done a lot of research, and we are going to do the following:

We don't have a whole lot, and we give as God moves us, but we would still like to give something. My daughters have a love for the homeless, so we are going to give two $20 gifts to some homeless people we know (from seeing them around). It's not enough just to give, so we will also be sharing God's love for them and asking to pray for them.

I do plan on getting the girls their own 50 cent pieces just for fun.

We have put together a menu plan, which was not that easy seeing as how we also eat a Paleo diet. (No grains, dairy, etc.) We will be making baskets with an entire meal for my brother (who just got out of the military and is having trouble finding a job) and a co-worker (that seems to hate me) whose father has recently passed.

We will each be fasting for three days prior to Purim to draw near to God. The girls will not be fasting food, but electronics.

We will also be reading Esther, doing a few crafts relating to the book of Esther, and playing some "games" that teach about steadfastness, hospitality, courageousness, and obedience to God.

Later we will conclude Purim by either watching One Night with the King or The Book of Esther.

Ours will probably be a lot more laid back than most, but I really just want to use it to teach the girls that God is always there... even when we don't see Him moving. I want to teach them about a time when a girl became a princess and even then was still afraid to do what was right. However, God gave her the strength to be courageous and used her to save many, many people.
I'm not a mom, so no idea if I would be this gutsy to ask, but I can't help wondering, if your daughters were given a choice in their fast, would they find it easier to give up food for three days or their electronics? lol

It does sound like you have a good plan in place.

From one not-rich to another, a suggestion you are free to reject or accept. (It's just a suggestion.) Instead of handing out gift cards to the homeless, something that works for me is to invite them to eat with me. No, I'm not the type to invite them to my house, but usually if I'm seeing homeless it's related to being out of my house. And, for whatever reason I'm out of my house, somewhere along the line I get hungry. (Woman. Always thinking of my next meal. lol) So, I'm going to find a food cart, cafeteria, or sandwich shop soon anyway. I take them with me, let them choose what to eat, and eat with them. Since money is tight always with me, those are the kinds of places I eat, and guaranteed no one can order more than $20 for food. (That would be eating two meal prices. lol)

One thing I find the homeless want more than food. They want to be remembered as people. They want to talk to others and be treated normally. They long for companionship even more than food. And no doubt, they ARE hungry too. They seem to appreciate being treated like a human being again, even if it is just briefly.

I am glad you figured out what to do. I never heard of Purim, so I like you went the extra distance to come up with a plan.
 
Aug 31, 2017
36
8
8
#20
I'm not a mom, so no idea if I would be this gutsy to ask, but I can't help wondering, if your daughters were given a choice in their fast, would they find it easier to give up food for three days or their electronics? lol

It does sound like you have a good plan in place.

From one not-rich to another, a suggestion you are free to reject or accept. (It's just a suggestion.) Instead of handing out gift cards to the homeless, something that works for me is to invite them to eat with me. No, I'm not the type to invite them to my house, but usually if I'm seeing homeless it's related to being out of my house. And, for whatever reason I'm out of my house, somewhere along the line I get hungry. (Woman. Always thinking of my next meal. lol) So, I'm going to find a food cart, cafeteria, or sandwich shop soon anyway. I take them with me, let them choose what to eat, and eat with them. Since money is tight always with me, those are the kinds of places I eat, and guaranteed no one can order more than $20 for food. (That would be eating two meal prices. lol)

One thing I find the homeless want more than food. They want to be remembered as people. They want to talk to others and be treated normally. They long for companionship even more than food. And no doubt, they ARE hungry too. They seem to appreciate being treated like a human being again, even if it is just briefly.

I am glad you figured out what to do. I never heard of Purim, so I like you went the extra distance to come up with a plan.
Actually the girls chose the electronics. They are only 6 and 8, and the only electronics we own are my phone, my laptop (no internet), and a TV (no service) with a DVD player. They play with hoverboards and lego robotics at my job 5 days a week as well as computer time. But it's only for a short amount of time. Food is a big deal in our family. We meal plan, shop, prepare, cook, partake, and clean together. It's equivalent to family time. The girls would rather give up electronics. Now if we were to trade that with gymnastics (8) and ballet (6), we might have had a different outcome. ??????????????????

I totally get what you are saying about the money vs time and interaction. We actually buy extra food and often bring little picnic baskets to some of the homeless people around us. My girls have had these people on their hearts for a few years. They have been actually trying to plan a ministry around them. I love it. We will sit down and break bread with them and have a picnic together. The girls love talking to them. But with this being a holiday and us having other plans, I think we're going to give cash. After all, sometimes things other than food are needed. I know what some people think, but it's not my job to micromanage a gift. A gift is just that - a gift. Whatever will keep them going so we can see them again later and keep sharing God's love... I'm good with it.

I did want to share our spread for the day:

I plan on treating it like Thanksgiving, where nobody really eats breakfast... we just tend to snack throughout the day. It was a little tough, though, because we are a paleo/primal family. So, no gluten, soy, sugar, etc.

Challah with Cinnamon Honey Butter (Lord, bless this recipe.)
Smoked Salmon Dip with Veggies
Kreplach Soup (Think chicken stuffed dumplings in a chicken broth with minimal veggies)
Persian Cucumber & Tomato Salad
Persian Jeweled (and Sprouted) Rice
Slow Cooker Jerk Chicken
Blackberry Lemon Chia Hamantaschen (Dessert)
Mulled Apple Cider (Because nobody is getting drunk over here ??????)