Singles Forum Math Problem of the Day! (Please Show Your Work.)

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MollyConnor

Guest
#21
Here's another dilemma for all you math whizzes out there...

Seoulsearch hates lima beans. Two lima beans on her plate would just be too many lima beans to try to stomach.

Therefore, how many ounces of lima beans will Seoulsearch be having at dinner?

(Yes. This is a trick question.)
 

seoulsearch

Senior Member
May 23, 2009
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#22
Well, I'm struggling between answering the question and allowing people to participate, which is no doubt your aim. Even though I can't help but assume you've already answered the question for yourself and are using it to bait conversation, I must indulge myself. Lynx is right, a straight comparison of area will not do in this instance. What needs to be taken into account is the length and width of each pattern to be cut and those divided somewhat categorically by width first (ie: patterns that are wider than half of the width of the material go in their own category because you can't put two of them beside each other.) Using this method and adding a set amount to the length and widths of each cut for padding, you could maximize the efficiency of your placement. However the human brain is great and can do all of this visually without a bunch of math, so my solution would be to lay out your patterns on top of the fabric and then cut the length of fabric you need.
Yeah, I know it's making it a little confusing and I'm sorry. :(

I never know how a thread will turn out unless I actually try, even if it bombs (I don't give up easily. :eek:)

And yes, I'm trying to measure out a grid of space on the floor and lay out the patterns... because I"m trying to determine how much fabric I'll need to buy.
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
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#24
I realize the question has already been answered, but I will show the equation as far as I have been able to work it out... the common denominator of three and four is twelve. One plus two thirds of twelve is twenty over twelve. Then you minus one quarter of twenty, because 45 is one quarter less than sixty. One quarter of twenty over twelve is fifteen over twelve (minus five from twenty). Therefore you need one and a quarter yards of material. Always buy a little extra :D Better to have a little too much than too little :)
 
Y

Yahweh_is_gracious

Guest
#25
It's simple ratios.

If you need 1.66 yards of 45" material, you need "x" of 60" material.

45" material is 75% the width of 60" material (45/60). Therefore, if you need 1.66 yards of 45" material, you need, theoretically, 75% of 1.66 yards of material or (1.66 x 0.75) or 1.245 yards of 60" wide material.
 

Magenta

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2015
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#26
Have you ever noticed when you buy pajamas, that one half has
the print pattern upside up and the other half is upside down?
 
M

MollyConnor

Guest
#27
Go for it, Molly!!!

I had a feeling this thread might go under your radar. ;)
The answer is...
0 ounces of lima beans!

And 12 onces of meat...b/c that Keto life!
 
Feb 7, 2015
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#29
Kim,

So far, Lynx is the only person to give you a practical, working answer. It is NOT any sort of conversion to square inches or feet that you need, but rather, a knowledge of what particular sizes will be required when you have actually cut the specific pieces you will need to make whatever the pattern calls for.

Switching to 60" could easily do nothing but give you a basketful of wasted scraps too small to go anywhere.
 

Lynx

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2014
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#31
Say, Kim ole buddy... would you be able to make a cloak? I'm thinking an old fashioned highwayman's cloak, but warmer and more durable than the stuff they churn out for Renaissance fairs. And how much would it cost? I would want it in a dark grey gabardine, with no hood, but with some kind of thick material between the outer and inner layers.
 

toinena

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2017
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#33
I have more than enough troubles to figure out how tall I am in feet and inches. And how (I really don't like to think about it) heavy I am in stones or pounds or gallons?? Nah. That should be volume. Some math freaks could calculate that as well. Let's start with height 171 cm is.....?
 
Y

Yahweh_is_gracious

Guest
#34
In many cases, the answer to a real-life math problem is "it depends". Do you want a perfectly correct, yet totally useless answer? Do you want a close approximation? Some people value accuracy, some value it's utility. If I were faced with the problem of figuring out how much less of a longer length fabric I needed, I wouldn't waste the time to figure. I'd just buy the longer stuff and have scrap. I ain't gotta pinch my pennies that tightly, and I'm unemployed.

A lot of times, you can find an accurate answer that isn't worth a spit.
 

MattforJesus

Senior Member
Apr 15, 2017
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#38
The basic problem is: 1 2/3 yards (length) of 45-inch fabric (width) will be equal to how many yards (what length) of fabric that is 60 inches wide?
It would be the same amount of fabric in square inches,because you times the length by the width to get the square inches of the whole fabric,if you convert the yards to inches.

1 2/3 yards is 60 inches length,and 45 inches width.

So if the 60 inches switches to width,then the 45 inches switches to length.

It would be 1 1/4 yards length(45 inches)and 60 inches width.

If you wanted the same amount of fabric as long as it comes out to 2700 square inches by timing the length and the width,then it would be the same.

1 2/3 yards,60 inches length x 45 inches length=2700 square inches.

1 1/4 yards,45 inches length x 60 inches length=2700 square inches.
 

penknight

Senior Member
Jan 6, 2014
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#39
I'm terrible with measurement problems unless they're in a algebraic or geometric formula. Could you ask one of those next time?
 
Feb 7, 2015
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#40
Are we in third grade?... "timesing" and "minusing" numbers?