Dear Transgender Bathroom Activists: What About the Safety/Privacy of Young Girls?

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Miri

The Thingy Member
Jul 22, 2012
9,052
2,004
113
UK age 51
#81
Now there's a thought, sharing the bathroom with aliens. :D



3706694646_d1f0176063.jpg
 
Mar 3, 2016
84
0
0
#83
Hi.

As I was reading these posts I thought many here seem to say transgender is that being used as a cover for all men who put a skirt or dress on and try to be or look like women , maybe the name has different meaning , does this include the cross dresser,s as I thought most of this was about them , maybe not .

or was this only about trans people who wont to be women .and quite a few will not wont to admit it they made a mistake and go back to being what they allways have been just men , and many are just lead on if you like jumped on the band wagon .



there is a very big difference between crossdresser,s and trans people ,

...noeleena...
 
Apr 22, 2016
32
0
0
#84
Children should not be going into a bathroom alone to begin with.I have nephews and I make sure my husband goes with them to the restroom. Yes,predators are everywhere.

The real issue seems to be parental responsibility, it seems. If there are predators everywhere, parents should ensure they are protecting their children no matter what the bathroom laws are.

The issue is allowing men into womens restrooms.

That is not the overarching issue, no. The issue is that people need to be able to use the bathroom in a way that maintains both their safety and their privacy. I’m not specifying any particular sex or gender on that, because I think this issue applies to all people. All people, including those who are transgender.

Sexual assault is a serious issue. I recognize that. However, I am unconvinced that allowing transgender people bathroom access will impact the levels of sexual assault that happens. Instead of news stories (which tend to be unreliable and heavily biased), I’d like to see the actual facts on the matter. Is there truly a correlation between allowing access for transgender individuals and sexual predation? Does correlation equal causation in this case?

The people who actually deal with sexual assault and violence do not seem to think so:

‘A coalition of over 200 national, state and local organizations across the U.S. that work with sexual assault and domestic violence survivors are objecting to the justifications given by lawmakers to forbid transgender people from using the bathroom of their choosing.

These organizations asked for “support of full and equal access for the transgender community," according to a statement on Thursday by a coalition under the advocacy group National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women.’

Also, I think it is important to look at states that already have measures in place to prevent discrimination of this kind:

‘Media Matters conducted interviews with heads of state police departments and civil and human rights organizations from 12 states that have non-discrimination laws that protect transgender people in public accommodations settings. Not one of the participants indicated any increase in sexual harassment or abuse as a result of passing the non-discrimination laws.

For example, Minnesota amended its Human Rights Act to prohibit discrimination against transgender people in employment, housing, and public accommodations in 1993. Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder told Media Matters in an interview that sexual harassment and assault as a result of the transgender non-discrimination law have not been “even remotely” a problem.’

And now let’s have a brief aside to look at how this issue impacts those who are transgender:
Mental and Physical Wellbeing
68% of respondents reported experiencing negative emotional symptoms, such as feeling emotionally sad, upset, or frustrated as a result of how they were treated based on their gender identity or gender expression within the past 30 days.’

‘Public accommodations discrimination in the past 12 months was also significantly associated with past-week depression.’

‘discrimination in public accommodations was also significantly associated with several negative health care utilization behaviors, including postponing needed medical care when sick or injured, postponing routine preventive care, and postponing care that resulted in having a medical emergency that required going to the emergency room or urgent care.’

‘in a survey of transgender and gender nonconforming people living in Washington, DC, 70% of survey respondents reported being harassed, assaulted, or denied access to public restrooms.’

‘Of the respondents who went to school in Washington, DC, 10% reported negative consequences such as excessive absence and dropping out because of issues related to bathroom access.’

'Of the respondents who worked in Washington, DC, 27% experienced being verbally harassed or denied access to the restrooms at their place of employment. These problems contributed to poor job performance, excessive absence, and excessive tardiness in some participants, and even caused some to quit or change jobs.’

‘the study showed that 58% of respondents reported avoiding going out in public because of concerns that they had regarding safety in the public restrooms.’
[‘State anti-transgender bathroom bills threaten transgender people’s health and participation in public life’ The Fenway Institute]

I don't believe in transgender. Not in the least. And I actually have a close friend who is doing this right now. I love him like a brother but I disagree with his lifestyle and I don't intend to call him "her" or another name.

If a trans individual comes here I would tell them God loves them, and so do I. As I said, I have a close friend,who served at my wedding and I love dearly, doing this right now. I would tell them that God has something better for them,a better path. And that they can be male and be happy as a male and God will give them a fulfilling life if they accept them into their life. So please don't come on here judging me as a bigot or phobic. You don't know me.

You have a highly transphobic attitude. Perhaps it would do you good to listen to this friend with an open heart. Everyone comes to discussions with their own preconceived ideas and biases, and I think we (we referring to all people, including myself and you) must try to leave those behind at some point. Sometimes, we have to listen and empathise. I would see this as of particular importance when dealing with a minority that already faces significant problems in their mental and physical wellbeing. Talk to your friend, and set aside the conservative beliefs until you have heard their full story. Ask them questions, and ask them with the attitude that you genuinely want to know the answer to them. I’m not asking you to agree with her, but at very least listen to what she has to say without interrupting to preach your own beliefs at her.

Also, use the correct pronouns because it is the polite thing to do. Continuously misgendering someone is only going to increase animosity between you both.

‘Laws aren't decided by the minority in this country. This is a republic where all vote and laws are put in place. Laws were never supposed to be changed because of popular opinion.’

I think I spot a contradiction :p
 
Apr 22, 2016
32
0
0
#85
I'm also very curious as to how these laws will be enforced without causing harassment to masculine women, feminine men, transgender men and transgender women.
 

blue_ladybug

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2014
67,924
5,847
113
#86
I vote that trannies get their OWN bathroom, therefore they don't have to go into the REAL men or women's bathrooms..
 
W

wwjd_kilden

Guest
#87
Maybe we have to learn to do like in the Victorian era: keep it in until we get home :p
 
Mar 3, 2016
84
0
0
#88
Hi ,

I can answer you concerning a masculine looking woman = female only once has it been brought up she had been a number of times to a local swimming pool with an other woman = female and granddaughter who at the time was about 5 give or take and most times was normal , on one time an other woman told the superviser a male was in the changing room so said superviser saw the other lady concerned and thought it would be a good idear to use an other changing room any one could use that male or female with wheel chair access.

Before that happened the superviser was called away later on the woman saw her again and said that she was in fact a female just was born with masculine facial features ...OH....

So a lovely letter was written to explain her condistion was hand given to the two Top women Boss,s and they said oh they know her history and had known for a very long time and there was no issue at all , so the letter was pined on there notice board for all to see read and understand what its like being different for an intersexed female .

So being different does have disadvantages and advantages and most people 95 % are lovely.

so quess who that woman is , I think you all know any way.

...noeleena...
 
Apr 22, 2016
32
0
0
#90
You know, it would be nice if people actually talked to transgender men and women before they spewed all this. Empathy doesn't seem to be particularly high on the list of priorities for some.
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
13,652
1,621
113
#93
Children should not be going into a bathroom alone to begin with.I have nephews and I make sure my husband goes with them to the restroom. Yes,predators are everywhere.

The real issue seems to be parental responsibility, it seems. If there are predators everywhere, parents should ensure they are protecting their children no matter what the bathroom laws are.

The issue is allowing men into womens restrooms.

That is not the overarching issue, no. The issue is that people need to be able to use the bathroom in a way that maintains both their safety and their privacy. I’m not specifying any particular sex or gender on that, because I think this issue applies to all people. All people, including those who are transgender.

Sexual assault is a serious issue. I recognize that. However, I am unconvinced that allowing transgender people bathroom access will impact the levels of sexual assault that happens. Instead of news stories (which tend to be unreliable and heavily biased), I’d like to see the actual facts on the matter. Is there truly a correlation between allowing access for transgender individuals and sexual predation? Does correlation equal causation in this case?

The people who actually deal with sexual assault and violence do not seem to think so:

‘A coalition of over 200 national, state and local organizations across the U.S. that work with sexual assault and domestic violence survivors are objecting to the justifications given by lawmakers to forbid transgender people from using the bathroom of their choosing.

These organizations asked for “support of full and equal access for the transgender community," according to a statement on Thursday by a coalition under the advocacy group National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women.’

Also, I think it is important to look at states that already have measures in place to prevent discrimination of this kind:

‘Media Matters conducted interviews with heads of state police departments and civil and human rights organizations from 12 states that have non-discrimination laws that protect transgender people in public accommodations settings. Not one of the participants indicated any increase in sexual harassment or abuse as a result of passing the non-discrimination laws.

For example, Minnesota amended its Human Rights Act to prohibit discrimination against transgender people in employment, housing, and public accommodations in 1993. Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder told Media Matters in an interview that sexual harassment and assault as a result of the transgender non-discrimination law have not been “even remotely” a problem.’

And now let’s have a brief aside to look at how this issue impacts those who are transgender:
Mental and Physical Wellbeing
68% of respondents reported experiencing negative emotional symptoms, such as feeling emotionally sad, upset, or frustrated as a result of how they were treated based on their gender identity or gender expression within the past 30 days.’

‘Public accommodations discrimination in the past 12 months was also significantly associated with past-week depression.’

‘discrimination in public accommodations was also significantly associated with several negative health care utilization behaviors, including postponing needed medical care when sick or injured, postponing routine preventive care, and postponing care that resulted in having a medical emergency that required going to the emergency room or urgent care.’

‘in a survey of transgender and gender nonconforming people living in Washington, DC, 70% of survey respondents reported being harassed, assaulted, or denied access to public restrooms.’

‘Of the respondents who went to school in Washington, DC, 10% reported negative consequences such as excessive absence and dropping out because of issues related to bathroom access.’

'Of the respondents who worked in Washington, DC, 27% experienced being verbally harassed or denied access to the restrooms at their place of employment. These problems contributed to poor job performance, excessive absence, and excessive tardiness in some participants, and even caused some to quit or change jobs.’

‘the study showed that 58% of respondents reported avoiding going out in public because of concerns that they had regarding safety in the public restrooms.’
[‘State anti-transgender bathroom bills threaten transgender people’s health and participation in public life’ The Fenway Institute]

I don't believe in transgender. Not in the least. And I actually have a close friend who is doing this right now. I love him like a brother but I disagree with his lifestyle and I don't intend to call him "her" or another name.

If a trans individual comes here I would tell them God loves them, and so do I. As I said, I have a close friend,who served at my wedding and I love dearly, doing this right now. I would tell them that God has something better for them,a better path. And that they can be male and be happy as a male and God will give them a fulfilling life if they accept them into their life. So please don't come on here judging me as a bigot or phobic. You don't know me.

You have a highly transphobic attitude. Perhaps it would do you good to listen to this friend with an open heart. Everyone comes to discussions with their own preconceived ideas and biases, and I think we (we referring to all people, including myself and you) must try to leave those behind at some point. Sometimes, we have to listen and empathise. I would see this as of particular importance when dealing with a minority that already faces significant problems in their mental and physical wellbeing. Talk to your friend, and set aside the conservative beliefs until you have heard their full story. Ask them questions, and ask them with the attitude that you genuinely want to know the answer to them. I’m not asking you to agree with her, but at very least listen to what she has to say without interrupting to preach your own beliefs at her.

Also, use the correct pronouns because it is the polite thing to do. Continuously misgendering someone is only going to increase animosity between you both.

‘Laws aren't decided by the minority in this country. This is a republic where all vote and laws are put in place. Laws were never supposed to be changed because of popular opinion.’

I think I spot a contradiction :p

I was about to use my usual format of using quotes to answer you but decided against it. I thought rather, to make my point in a different way. The following are a few quotes from a woman who was raped as a child;

[h=2]Victimizers Use Any Opening They Can Find-Let me be clear: I am not saying that transgender people are predators. Not by a long shot. What I am saying is that there are countless deviant men in this world who will pretend to be transgender as a means of gaining access to the people they want to exploit, namely women and children. It already happens... it is nothing short of negligent to instate policies that elevate the emotional comfort of a relative few over the physical safety of a large group of vulnerable people.[/h]Don’t they know anything about predators? Don’t they know the numbers? That out of every 100 rapes, only two rapists will spend so much as single day in jail while the other 98 walk free and hang out in our midst? Don’t they know that predators are known to intentionally seek out places where many of their preferred targets gather in groups? Don’t they know that insurance companies highlight locker rooms as a high-risk area for abuse that should be carefully monitored and protected?

Don’t they know that one out of every four little girls will be sexually abused during childhood, and that’s without giving predators free access to them while they shower? Don’t they know that, for women who have experienced sexual trauma, finding the courage to use a locker room at all is a freaking badge of honor? That many of these women view life through a kaleidoscope of shame and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, dissociation, poor body image, eating disorders, drug and alcohol abuse, difficulty with intimacy, and worse?

Why would people knowingly invite further exploitation by creating policies with no safeguards in place to protect them from injury? With zero screening options to ensure that biological males who enter locker rooms actually identify as female, how could a woman be sure the person staring at her wasn’t exploiting her? Why is it okay to make her wonder?

Despite the many reports of sexual abuse and assault that exist in our world, there’s an even larger number of victims who never tell about it. The reason? They’re afraid no one will believe them. Even worse, they’re terrified of a reality they already innately know to be true: even if people did know, they wouldn’t do anything to help. They’re not worth protecting. Even silence feels better than that.

There’s no way to make everyone happy in the situation of transgender locker room use. So the priority ought to be finding a way to keep everyone safe. I’d much rather risk hurting a smaller number of people’s feelings by asking transgender people to use a single-occupancy restroom that still offers safety than risk jeopardizing the safety of thousands of women and kids with a policy that gives would-be predators a free pass.

Is it ironic to no one that being “progressive” actually sets women’s lib back about a century? What of my right to do my darndest to insist that the first time my daughter sees the adult male form it will be because she’s chosen it, not because it’s forced upon her? What of our emotional and physical rights? Unless and until you’ve lined a bathroom door with a towel for protection, you can’t tell me the risk isn’t there.

I feel a sense of urgency to invite people to consider the not-so-hidden dangers of these policies before more and more of them get cemented into place. Once that happens, the only way they’ll change is when innocent people get hurt.


I think this womans story says it all. This is what people are upset about.This is why a petition has been signed by 200,000 on the first day. People see the danger and want to protect against it. If the gov't wants to provide separate bathrooms for transgender et al thats one thing.Putting women and children in danger is another issue all together. I'm not a victim of sexual abuse but I feel strongly that this woman has made a great case against males going into a womans restroom. She asks where are her rights? Where indeed.


 
C

coby2

Guest
#94
Kids rooms, man rooms, woman rooms, unisex rooms. Everybody happy, especially the ones that can make money with building them.
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
13,652
1,621
113
#95

I was about to use my usual format of using quotes to answer you but decided against it. I thought rather, to make my point in a different way. The following are a few quotes from a woman who was raped as a child;

Victimizers Use Any Opening They Can Find-Let me be clear: I am not saying that transgender people are predators. Not by a long shot. What I am saying is that there are countless deviant men in this world who will pretend to be transgender as a means of gaining access to the people they want to exploit, namely women and children. It already happens... it is nothing short of negligent to instate policies that elevate the emotional comfort of a relative few over the physical safety of a large group of vulnerable people.

Don’t they know anything about predators? Don’t they know the numbers? That out of every 100 rapes, only two rapists will spend so much as single day in jail while the other 98 walk free and hang out in our midst? Don’t they know that predators are known to intentionally seek out places where many of their preferred targets gather in groups? Don’t they know that insurance companies highlight locker rooms as a high-risk area for abuse that should be carefully monitored and protected?

Don’t they know that one out of every four little girls will be sexually abused during childhood, and that’s without giving predators free access to them while they shower? Don’t they know that, for women who have experienced sexual trauma, finding the courage to use a locker room at all is a freaking badge of honor? That many of these women view life through a kaleidoscope of shame and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, dissociation, poor body image, eating disorders, drug and alcohol abuse, difficulty with intimacy, and worse?

Why would people knowingly invite further exploitation by creating policies with no safeguards in place to protect them from injury? With zero screening options to ensure that biological males who enter locker rooms actually identify as female, how could a woman be sure the person staring at her wasn’t exploiting her? Why is it okay to make her wonder?

Despite the many reports of sexual abuse and assault that exist in our world, there’s an even larger number of victims who never tell about it. The reason? They’re afraid no one will believe them. Even worse, they’re terrified of a reality they already innately know to be true: even if people did know, they wouldn’t do anything to help. They’re not worth protecting. Even silence feels better than that.

There’s no way to make everyone happy in the situation of transgender locker room use. So the priority ought to be finding a way to keep everyone safe. I’d much rather risk hurting a smaller number of people’s feelings by asking transgender people to use a single-occupancy restroom that still offers safety than risk jeopardizing the safety of thousands of women and kids with a policy that gives would-be predators a free pass.

Is it ironic to no one that being “progressive” actually sets women’s lib back about a century? What of my right to do my darndest to insist that the first time my daughter sees the adult male form it will be because she’s chosen it, not because it’s forced upon her? What of our emotional and physical rights? Unless and until you’ve lined a bathroom door with a towel for protection, you can’t tell me the risk isn’t there.

I feel a sense of urgency to invite people to consider the not-so-hidden dangers of these policies before more and more of them get cemented into place. Once that happens, the only way they’ll change is when innocent people get hurt.


I think this womans story says it all. This is what people are upset about.This is why a petition has been signed by 200,000 on the first day. People see the danger and want to protect against it. If the gov't wants to provide separate bathrooms for transgender et al thats one thing.Putting women and children in danger is another issue all together. I'm not a victim of sexual abuse but I feel strongly that this woman has made a great case against males going into a womans restroom. She asks where are her rights? Where indeed.


Within her story,http://thefederalist.com/2015/11/23/a-rape-survivor-speaks-out-about-transgender-bathrooms/
she added these news stories...


Man Disguised as Woman Recorded "Hours" of Mall Restroom Video

Man Disguised as Woman Recorded "Hours" of Mall Restroom Video: Investigators | NBC Southern California


Cross-dressing man arrested for exposure at Walmart

Cross-dressing man arrested for exposure at Walmart | www.ajc.com


Police: Man in bra and wig found in women's bathroom

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/article/Police-Man-in-bra-and-wig-found-in-women-s-3414089.php


Empathy doesn't override safety. It just doesn't. A small percentage of people are transgendered in this country. If people vote to have restrooms for them then thats one thing. You say there is no empathy for trans people, and where is your empathy for the lady in the story? She feels unsafe with males in a female restroom. Where are her rights? You think I have no empathy,I could say the same back to you. Is the safety of women and children not as important?

[h=1]http://dailysignal.com/2016/01/25/sexual-assault-victims-speak-out-against-washingtons-transgender-bathroom-policies/[/h]
 
Last edited:
Apr 22, 2016
32
0
0
#96
‘With zero screening options to ensure that biological males who enter locker rooms actually identify as female’

There are zero screening options to ensure biological females who enter locker rooms are biologically female.

There is also no evidence that single-sex facilities protect people from sexual assault, or that granting transgender people access to the bathroom that matches their chosen gender increases sexual assault cases. I feel awful for this victim of sexual assault, but that doesn’t mean I’m willing to accept her theories on what allowing access for transgender individuals will do. A majority of cases of sexual assault are perpetrated by people who know the victim. These aren’t random people hiding in bathrooms, these are family and friends.

It’s also important to note that a significant proportion of transgender people experience sexual assault.

‘A coalition of over 200 national, state and local organizations across the U.S. that work with sexual assault and domestic violence survivors are objecting to the justifications given by lawmakers to forbid transgender people from using the bathroom of their choosing.

These organizations asked for “support of full and equal access for the transgender community," according to a statement on Thursday by a coalition under the advocacy group National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women.’

These people work with victims every day of their lives, and are advocating for access.

‘Media Matters conducted interviews with heads of state police departments and civil and human rights organizations from 12 states that have non-discrimination laws that protect transgender people in public accommodations settings. Not one of the participants indicated any increase in sexual harassment or abuse as a result of passing the non-discrimination laws.

For example, Minnesota amended its Human Rights Act to prohibit discrimination against transgender people in employment, housing, and public accommodations in 1993. Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder told Media Matters in an interview that sexual harassment and assault as a result of the transgender non-discrimination law have not been “even remotely” a problem.’


Other states already have equal access. It’s really difficult to see how this is any more than just scaremongering.
 
Apr 22, 2016
32
0
0
#97
Within her story,http://thefederalist.com/2015/11/23/a-rape-survivor-speaks-out-about-transgender-bathrooms/
she added these news stories...




Man Disguised as Woman Recorded "Hours" of Mall Restroom Video

Man Disguised as Woman Recorded "Hours" of Mall Restroom Video: Investigators | NBC Southern California


Cross-dressing man arrested for exposure at Walmart

Cross-dressing man arrested for exposure at Walmart | www.ajc.com


Police: Man in bra and wig found in women's bathroom

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/article/Police-Man-in-bra-and-wig-found-in-women-s-3414089.php


Empathy doesn't override safety. It just doesn't. A small percentage of people are transgendered in this country. If people vote to have restrooms for them then thats one thing. You say there is no empathy for trans people, and where is your empathy for the lady in the story? She feels unsafe with males in a female restroom. Where are her rights? You think I have no empathy,I could say the same back to you. Is the safety of women and children not as important?

http://dailysignal.com/2016/01/25/sexual-assault-victims-speak-out-against-washingtons-transgender-bathroom-policies/
Isolated cases? You need to provide statistical evidence that proves there is an increase in sexual assault cases with transgender access, and that transgender access is the cause of this.
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
13,652
1,621
113
#98
‘With zero screening options to ensure that biological males who enter locker rooms actually identify as female’

There are zero screening options to ensure biological females who enter locker rooms are biologically female.

There is also no evidence that single-sex facilities protect people from sexual assault, or that granting transgender people access to the bathroom that matches their chosen gender increases sexual assault cases. I feel awful for this victim of sexual assault, but that doesn’t mean I’m willing to accept her theories on what allowing access for transgender individuals will do. A majority of cases of sexual assault are perpetrated by people who know the victim. These aren’t random people hiding in bathrooms, these are family and friends.

It’s also important to note that a significant proportion of transgender people experience sexual assault.

‘A coalition of over 200 national, state and local organizations across the U.S. that work with sexual assault and domestic violence survivors are objecting to the justifications given by lawmakers to forbid transgender people from using the bathroom of their choosing.

These organizations asked for “support of full and equal access for the transgender community," according to a statement on Thursday by a coalition under the advocacy group National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women.’

These people work with victims every day of their lives, and are advocating for access.

‘Media Matters conducted interviews with heads of state police departments and civil and human rights organizations from 12 states that have non-discrimination laws that protect transgender people in public accommodations settings. Not one of the participants indicated any increase in sexual harassment or abuse as a result of passing the non-discrimination laws.

For example, Minnesota amended its Human Rights Act to prohibit discrimination against transgender people in employment, housing, and public accommodations in 1993. Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder told Media Matters in an interview that sexual harassment and assault as a result of the transgender non-discrimination law have not been “even remotely” a problem.’


Other states already have equal access. It’s really difficult to see how this is any more than just scaremongering.

It’s really difficult to see how this is any more than just scaremongering.


Have you been a victim of sexual assault? Did you read what the victim said? Where are her rights? Where are her rights to feel safe? Its easy for you to say "scaremongering". You're not a victim. I dont see your empathy for them at all. smh
 

blue_ladybug

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2014
67,924
5,847
113
#99
In the women's restroom, one woman is NOT going to rape another. Same with the men's room. Now, enter a tranny, or someone posing as one. You don't know if they're a rapist or a pedophile. A man in the ladies room WOULD be more likely to rape a woman in the bathroom. Simple solution: men stay in the men's br, women in the women's br, and trannies in their own br.. Why put the temptation out there for trannies to (possibly) commit an assault on women or children?
 

kaylagrl

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2014
13,652
1,621
113
In the women's restroom, one woman is NOT going to rape another. Same with the men's room. Now, enter a tranny, or someone posing as one. You don't know if they're a rapist or a pedophile. A man in the ladies room WOULD be more likely to rape a woman in the bathroom. Simple solution: men stay in the men's br, women in the women's br, and trannies in their own br.. Why put the temptation out there for trannies to (possibly) commit an assault on women or children?

As with the point I was making, its not trans people its males in female bathrooms. There is no reason for it. There are a small number of trans people in the country. Empathy for hurt feelings does not override a sexual assault victims rights to feel safe in a vulnerable place. Or the danger to children. Gooey sees one side only in this. Anything else is fearmongering.Sad.