For insomniacs and those who have trouble sleeping in the night

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Mar 25, 2020
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#1
Hi. I'm an insomniac and I'm sure there are some of you who have trouble sleeping in the night. I'm just going to leave here what helps me sleep at night and you can add to it if you find something you want to which works for you.

Usually we keep awake in the night to do

1. Our Studies.
2. Work culture.
3. Entertain ourselves.

These are the three main reasons I have this problem

Some of us don't have a choice but for those of you who want to make a change these things helped me out:

1. Use yellow lights instead of blue lights (White coloured).
2. Lights out at a fixed time, say 10 o clock or even 12 o clock (for those who keep awake, you know how it is). There should be no light in the room.
3. Avoid watching media as the light does affect the eyes and your ability to fall asleep.
4. Sleep music helps. You can google it or visit youtube. Lots of deep sleep music available.
5. Praying. (I always check in with God as I go to sleep. I suppose most of us do, it's one of my habits, no matter how early or how late I go to bed. I'm adding that here as it will be helpful for someone else to try out)
6. Listening to a podcast.

Of late, for me, sleep music helps me focus more on sleeping. That's just me. Hope this will help someone. If anyone wants to add or share what helps you sleep better, please do share. It will come in handy for me and will be of help to someone else who has the problem

God bless you!
 

Subhumanoidal

Well-known member
Sep 17, 2018
2,850
2,328
113
#2
For some avoiding media may actually make it harder to fall asleep. I need the distraction.
If you're that way use blue light filters when watching. Some newer TV's have it built in as an option. Windows 10 has it built in by default. And some phones and tablets also have it built in.
If not there are apps and software available to download. Some try to cheat and don't filter blue light but rather add orange. Adding orange doesn't work, so check to make sure it actually filters the blue light.
And obviously lower volumes and screen brightness are more useful. As is choosing what you watch.
 

stepbystep

Well-known member
Aug 31, 2020
613
488
63
#3
Being rather sleepy, I find myself considering what the difference is between insomniacs and those who have trouble sleeping at night.
 
Mar 25, 2020
222
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#4
Being rather sleepy, I find myself considering what the difference is between insomniacs and those who have trouble sleeping at night.
Good question. Good to know that you feel sleepy. Wish I could say the same. It's important which part of the day I feel that way though. I prefer feeling sleepy during the night which is hardly the case most days. I'm trying these days to do that. The trouble for me is, I sleep during the day. Hope you're feeling sleepy during the night. Oh, I must have been subconsciously trying to differentiate Insomniacs as those don't feel sleepy during the night and "those who have trouble sleeping," as those who can sleep during the night but don't.
 

seoulsearch

OutWrite Trouble
May 23, 2009
13,406
3,569
113
#5
Being rather sleepy, I find myself considering what the difference is between insomniacs and those who have trouble sleeping at night.
I'm sure it manifests differently for different people, but for me, being an insomniac means that I literally cannot fall asleep, no matter how sleepy I feel, or how long I feel sleepy. I will just lie there and literally toss and turn for hours on end. If I try to take sleeping pills, I'm overcome with an overwhelmingly groggy, nauseous feeling, but I still don't fall asleep -- I'm pretty sure that it's what a zombie must feel like.

I've often said that my sleeping mechanism seems to be "broken", just like a clock, as a result of living in several different time zones and working every shift there is (with starting times anywhere from 3 AM to midnight and everything in between, or trying to juggle multiple jobs and classes.)

Somewhere along the line, my system lost the ability to naturally fall asleep, and it's something that plagues my life every single night. Even with meds, I only sleep about 3 hours a night on average, sometimes less.

My sympathies go out to anyone struggling with sleeping problems. I know how hard it is, and I know it's even worse when the doctors can't seem to find any answers.
 

Blain

The Word Weaver
Aug 28, 2012
17,416
1,828
113
#6
I have trouble sleeping but it there are factors that vary, I take meletonin to go to sleep it usually starts working within two or three hours but the issue is staying asleep I always wake up three times exactly during the night and then other times for no reason I just can't sleep at all and am laying in bed all night sometimes I can reach the point where I am just about to go on the brink of nodding off and my body just suddenly wakes up

I have tried so many sleeping meds tried every sleeping schedual possible I tried listening to music I tried calming myself and emptying my mind but every night even if I do go to sleep three times I wake up and sometimes cannot go back to sleep.

I wonder it must feel like to be fully rested and alert.
 

SoulWeaver

Senior Member
Oct 25, 2014
4,891
2,531
113
#7
Having sufficient physical activity helps. Even if you do intense mental work all day, and if the body feels sore from sitting, if the body is not tired out to match the mind, you can struggle sleeping.
 
Mar 25, 2020
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#8
I didn't know that it could get that worse. What Seoulsearch and Blain have shared here is the kind of trouble I have had some days until I seriously took it upon myself to follow a fixed sleep routine and trying to adhere to it. It's hard. It's not easy. And yes, I have woken up suddenly after just 1 1/2 hours of sleep in the night and not being able to sleep the rest of the night. And what happens is that your body is used to strain and keep awake through the night and then you go and sleep all day. Now if this happens to an individual who has to work it is even more hard. And I know the feeling of walking about and feeling like a zombie. Of sleeping in the morning and not feel properly rested. The night is for sleeping. The night was created for sleep. It's when your internal organs recover naturally. Keeping awake is unhealthy. Unfortunately some people don't have a choice. I've been used to keeping the oil burning all night for a long time, since my early teens, through school, college. Now, it's becoming a problem. It is one. I have been working to get myself back on getting good night's sleep. And putting on a sleep music track and focusing on it while I shut my eyes tight seems to do the trick for now. So I guess I'm lucky. I have not gone to the stages of taking sleep medication. My grandfather used to take sleep medication every night and he was very particular about sleep in the night and even his afternoon siesta. He'll get very angry when disturbed from sleep. I didn't understand that at the time but now I know. Of course, when you have worked hard during the day, sleep is possible. Still, I am used to keeping awake at night. So used, that I want to break the habit.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
12,886
4,592
113
#9
I used to have major problems starting from my teens not so much getting to sleep but waking up really early, like 3 am and then not being able to get back to sleep. It was so bad and disturbing esp for my parents that I was put on sleeping pills which made things worse, cos they conked me out but I did not get my natural sleep.

I am not sure what triggered the waking at this odd time but it somehow my dad, who worked late night shifts and get home at 2pm could just get by on 5 hours sleep and it didnt seem a problem for him, but if I was up and about I was somehow supposed to just deal with it by lying in the dark and not even getting up.
I would try listening to music on headphones and fall asleep to stop thinking about stuff all the time. I dont think it helped as the stuff I lstened to back then was pop music! I also was probably stressed about school and life as you are generally all angsty and out of sorts at that age. I sufferd from huge depressions and mood swings. (you wouldnt want to be round me on the full moon lets say)

I later learned that if I did wake up I could pray or read the Bible quietly and it helped, and now with wifi If i wake early I can hop on to christian forums and think and write about spiritual thoughts. If you dont have that you could just write in a paper diary.

I no longer need to take meds and havent had any problem sleeping for years...I had deliverance for a lot of demons and they just went away praise the Lord, and now my sleep is sweet so to cut a long story short if something is really bothering you DO seek help and prayer for it and confess whatever it is thats stopping you from sleeping, whatever fear or anxiety it is. getting to the root of the problem really helps.
 
Mar 25, 2020
222
126
43
#10
I used to have major problems starting from my teens not so much getting to sleep but waking up really early, like 3 am and then not being able to get back to sleep. It was so bad and disturbing esp for my parents that I was put on sleeping pills which made things worse, cos they conked me out but I did not get my natural sleep.

I am not sure what triggered the waking at this odd time but it somehow my dad, who worked late night shifts and get home at 2pm could just get by on 5 hours sleep and it didnt seem a problem for him, but if I was up and about I was somehow supposed to just deal with it by lying in the dark and not even getting up.
I would try listening to music on headphones and fall asleep to stop thinking about stuff all the time. I dont think it helped as the stuff I lstened to back then was pop music! I also was probably stressed about school and life as you are generally all angsty and out of sorts at that age. I sufferd from huge depressions and mood swings. (you wouldnt want to be round me on the full moon lets say)

I later learned that if I did wake up I could pray or read the Bible quietly and it helped, and now with wifi If i wake early I can hop on to christian forums and think and write about spiritual thoughts. If you dont have that you could just write in a paper diary.

I no longer need to take meds and havent had any problem sleeping for years...I had deliverance for a lot of demons and they just went away praise the Lord, and now my sleep is sweet so to cut a long story short if something is really bothering you DO seek help and prayer for it and confess whatever it is thats stopping you from sleeping, whatever fear or anxiety it is. getting to the root of the problem really helps.
Thank you. I think I understand what you mean. Writing here helps me too. And I know what is carried to God in prayer does give us favourable answers from Him at the right time
 

seoulsearch

OutWrite Trouble
May 23, 2009
13,406
3,569
113
#11
I didn't know that it could get that worse. What Seoulsearch and Blain have shared here is the kind of trouble I have had some days until I seriously took it upon myself to follow a fixed sleep routine and trying to adhere to it. It's hard. It's not easy. And yes, I have woken up suddenly after just 1 1/2 hours of sleep in the night and not being able to sleep the rest of the night. And what happens is that your body is used to strain and keep awake through the night and then you go and sleep all day. Now if this happens to an individual who has to work it is even more hard. And I know the feeling of walking about and feeling like a zombie. Of sleeping in the morning and not feel properly rested. The night is for sleeping. The night was created for sleep. It's when your internal organs recover naturally. Keeping awake is unhealthy. Unfortunately some people don't have a choice. I've been used to keeping the oil burning all night for a long time, since my early teens, through school, college. Now, it's becoming a problem. It is one. I have been working to get myself back on getting good night's sleep. And putting on a sleep music track and focusing on it while I shut my eyes tight seems to do the trick for now. So I guess I'm lucky. I have not gone to the stages of taking sleep medication. My grandfather used to take sleep medication every night and he was very particular about sleep in the night and even his afternoon siesta. He'll get very angry when disturbed from sleep. I didn't understand that at the time but now I know. Of course, when you have worked hard during the day, sleep is possible. Still, I am used to keeping awake at night. So used, that I want to break the habit.
This thread has me thinking a lot about where my own sleeping problems must have originated. I know there is a ton of advice out there regarding the topic, but none of it seems to work for me, and I was trying to think of why.

I was thinking back over my work history and the shift changes I had over the years. I started out working at around 3 or 4 in the morning; then worked a steady 9-6 for several years; then shifts that started in the afternoons (say, starting anywhere from 2 -6 PM until whatever time at night.) After that, I worked graveyard for 5 years, and I actually grew to love it -- when my schedule was consistent. It was truly an introvert's dream, as I worked by myself and loved that could get so much done.

But then my boss got the brilliant idea that she could just start yo-yo'ing my hours back and forth until eventually it got to the point where I was working from 10 at night, getting off at 6 in the morning -- then she expected me to be back at 2 PM that afternoon and somehow still be able to function while switching back and forth on a daily basis. Some of my co-workers were doing this in reverse -- working a 7 -3, then were expected to come back in at 11 PM. I challenge anyone to work those kinds of hours and not develop sleeping problems and anyone out there can, please, PM me with advice on how to do it or recover from it. That's actually a sincere request and not sarcasm, because some people have no choice and I would really love to know how they're able to survive.

For myself, I eventually put my foot down and told her, All nights, or nothing (there was another department manager who was trying to get me into her department, so I had another position secured, just in case.)

I have to admit that I get annoyed when doctors try to tell me about "sleep hygiene" and all the advice out there because it's like, Yeah, Yeah, believe me, I've tried it all, and it doesn't work (for me.)

Maybe other people could have done it, but this, along with several other stressful events in my life, and as I'd mentioned, living in different time zones, just seemed to eventually break me. I truly feel for all the people out there who get caught up in situations like this as well, because that's just what their job demands. I'm just thankful that God opened the doors for me to eventually get out of that situation. Unfortunately, my sleeping has never recovered, but I'm working on that. I suppose if anyone wants to see a plus in all of this, I never get jet lag and can adjust to any time zone simply because I just stay awak

@justahumanbeing -- Thanks so much for writing this thread. It's really gotten me to map out my own history with insomnia and I'm going to mention these things the next time I see the doctor.

I will definitely be keeping you and @Blain in my prayers.

May the Lord grant you rest, and God bless. :)
 
Mar 25, 2020
222
126
43
#12
This thread has me thinking a lot about where my own sleeping problems must have originated. I know there is a ton of advice out there regarding the topic, but none of it seems to work for me, and I was trying to think of why.

I was thinking back over my work history and the shift changes I had over the years. I started out working at around 3 or 4 in the morning; then worked a steady 9-6 for several years; then shifts that started in the afternoons (say, starting anywhere from 2 -6 PM until whatever time at night.) After that, I worked graveyard for 5 years, and I actually grew to love it -- when my schedule was consistent. It was truly an introvert's dream, as I worked by myself and loved that could get so much done.

But then my boss got the brilliant idea that she could just start yo-yo'ing my hours back and forth until eventually it got to the point where I was working from 10 at night, getting off at 6 in the morning -- then she expected me to be back at 2 PM that afternoon and somehow still be able to function while switching back and forth on a daily basis. Some of my co-workers were doing this in reverse -- working a 7 -3, then were expected to come back in at 11 PM. I challenge anyone to work those kinds of hours and not develop sleeping problems and anyone out there can, please, PM me with advice on how to do it or recover from it. That's actually a sincere request and not sarcasm, because some people have no choice and I would really love to know how they're able to survive.

For myself, I eventually put my foot down and told her, All nights, or nothing (there was another department manager who was trying to get me into her department, so I had another position secured, just in case.)

I have to admit that I get annoyed when doctors try to tell me about "sleep hygiene" and all the advice out there because it's like, Yeah, Yeah, believe me, I've tried it all, and it doesn't work (for me.)

Maybe other people could have done it, but this, along with several other stressful events in my life, and as I'd mentioned, living in different time zones, just seemed to eventually break me. I truly feel for all the people out there who get caught up in situations like this as well, because that's just what their job demands. I'm just thankful that God opened the doors for me to eventually get out of that situation. Unfortunately, my sleeping has never recovered, but I'm working on that. I suppose if anyone wants to see a plus in all of this, I never get jet lag and can adjust to any time zone simply because I just stay awak

@justahumanbeing -- Thanks so much for writing this thread. It's really gotten me to map out my own history with insomnia and I'm going to mention these things the next time I see the doctor.

I will definitely be keeping you and @Blain in my prayers.

May the Lord grant you rest, and God bless. :)
Thank you brother @seoulsearch and you're welcome. And thank you for sharing here the hectic work routine which you had to undertake in career. And as you say, sleeplessness is a multifaceted issue and it arises over a variety of factors. Almost everyone among this generation of people do undergo them for various reasons with varying levels of being affected by it. But it happens at the worst level when we begin our work life and progress that way working odd hours.

I've also done all kinds of shifts during my few years of work life. The worst was the 10 in the night to anywhere in the morning shift and the worst part is that we're expected to work overtime. Not to mention work even on the days off during the day time. Now that can really give you a lot pressure and it did get to me. I've seen you go through that and still here to tell how it all is. I couldn't adapt to that kind of life and besides it was just a phase for me. I was not in it long term. I have other priorities now and better opportunities by God's grace so I don't have to live like that. Although, I'm still dealing with the aftermath of what I put my body through.

Anyway, I thank you again for sharing and will keep you and all who go through this problem in my prayers as well. Yes, I often don't talk about this except maybe with friends and it was good sharing this sleeping problem with people who know what it's like and friends here. I'm sure God will show you a way to get relief from all this and will lead the way for you in your life. God bless you
 

Mak33

Well-known member
Nov 12, 2019
344
352
63
#13
I drink Chamomile tea (I add peppermint or mint tea for better taste), literally the tea works for me, in half an hour I will start to fall asleep, I also listen to podcast preachings and for sure after awhile I will doze off. Physical activities like stretching or light exercises can be very tiring but doing cardio will keep me awake. Reading a book or an ebook helps, Sometimes I use lavender essential oil or peppermint as aromatherapy too but I can't sleep with music.
 

Blain

The Word Weaver
Aug 28, 2012
17,416
1,828
113
#14
This thread has me thinking a lot about where my own sleeping problems must have originated. I know there is a ton of advice out there regarding the topic, but none of it seems to work for me, and I was trying to think of why.

I was thinking back over my work history and the shift changes I had over the years. I started out working at around 3 or 4 in the morning; then worked a steady 9-6 for several years; then shifts that started in the afternoons (say, starting anywhere from 2 -6 PM until whatever time at night.) After that, I worked graveyard for 5 years, and I actually grew to love it -- when my schedule was consistent. It was truly an introvert's dream, as I worked by myself and loved that could get so much done.

But then my boss got the brilliant idea that she could just start yo-yo'ing my hours back and forth until eventually it got to the point where I was working from 10 at night, getting off at 6 in the morning -- then she expected me to be back at 2 PM that afternoon and somehow still be able to function while switching back and forth on a daily basis. Some of my co-workers were doing this in reverse -- working a 7 -3, then were expected to come back in at 11 PM. I challenge anyone to work those kinds of hours and not develop sleeping problems and anyone out there can, please, PM me with advice on how to do it or recover from it. That's actually a sincere request and not sarcasm, because some people have no choice and I would really love to know how they're able to survive.

For myself, I eventually put my foot down and told her, All nights, or nothing (there was another department manager who was trying to get me into her department, so I had another position secured, just in case.)

I have to admit that I get annoyed when doctors try to tell me about "sleep hygiene" and all the advice out there because it's like, Yeah, Yeah, believe me, I've tried it all, and it doesn't work (for me.)

Maybe other people could have done it, but this, along with several other stressful events in my life, and as I'd mentioned, living in different time zones, just seemed to eventually break me. I truly feel for all the people out there who get caught up in situations like this as well, because that's just what their job demands. I'm just thankful that God opened the doors for me to eventually get out of that situation. Unfortunately, my sleeping has never recovered, but I'm working on that. I suppose if anyone wants to see a plus in all of this, I never get jet lag and can adjust to any time zone simply because I just stay awak

@justahumanbeing -- Thanks so much for writing this thread. It's really gotten me to map out my own history with insomnia and I'm going to mention these things the next time I see the doctor.

I will definitely be keeping you and @Blain in my prayers.

May the Lord grant you rest, and God bless. :)
Well I think for me in particular my sleeping issues only really started fater my battle with cancer, the radiation and chemo affected my body and my brain permantently so my sleeping issues may have come from that I mean my brain doesn't work like normal brains do if you think of wires normally brains have certain wires that connect to something but mine kind of switches and mixes the wires so it wouldn't surprise me if that had something to do with it.

but it is also true as we get older our body changes and can even develop issues we never had before
 

BrotherMike

Be Still and Know
Jan 8, 2018
1,366
1,436
113
#15
I worked night shift for most of my life and working dayshift now since April. Some days maybe half in a week I have woken up a few times at night and still have not adjusted to days. I don’t recommend working nights unless you don’t have any other choice.
 

Lanolin

Well-known member
Dec 15, 2018
12,886
4,592
113
#16
question what type of job has you working graveyard shifts?
The latest I will work is till 9pm, I wouldnt consider working nights unless I had reasonable breaks, but even then.
I have found school hours are reasonable 6 hour shifts and retail usually in 4 hour shifts.

when I worked 40 hours a week it was an 8 hour day. when I gardened and had to be on site at 7am to get home before 3 would work only during summer seasons in winter it was hard getting up in the dark.

I consider beauty sleep important and do not like being asked to go to meetings that drag on for hours until past ten pm at night. especially if having to go to work the next day.
sometimes prayer meetings were like that, especially if it was a ladies one and the host wanted you to stay for cup of tea or cake and you feel obligated to stay, alright for them they didnt have to work the next day or drive miles home. So I learned if there was any kind of evening meeting to say I can only stay till Nine and then im going.
I dont miss out on any of the chit chat.

some jobs I needed to do homework or prep for so I would set aside time for that.
Your body really does its best repairing itself when you sleep. Its also time when you grow Which is why children need lots of sleep and need to be in bed by eight.
I consider hitting the pillow by ten and usually fall straight to sleep.

biblically we are of the day and do our work during the day when we can see I dont think I would get used to working round the clock at night it would turn me into a vampire like creature and I wouldnt get my vitamin D which a lot of us need for strong bones.
 

laughingheart

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2016
1,709
1,664
113
#17
I need to be creative but being that sort of person interferes with the ability to shut it down at night. I think being single leaves me a little too prone to follow ideas like a beagle follows a scent. About a week ago I had a story idea. I began to write and that is when you get swamped with possibilities. I spent most of the last week writing and editing. My brain wouldn't stop editing. Once I submitted it, I relaxed a bit mentally. Right now it is 2 am and I'm finally feeling tired enough to sleep. Hopefully there will not be too many re-writes because it is time to start on the next story (let's not discuss the unfinished painting).
 
Aug 4, 2021
586
181
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#18
Dropping anger and get perfect peace is key for me. And lately I also found out that by reading something your mind cannot process at all, makes the brain shutdown. So I read some mad philosophical rambling essays that buddy wrote, that just made one complicated question even more cloudy, and 1 question lead to 10 new questions. 1 or 2 of those, and I just yawn and must go to sleep. It should be a topic you are interested in and study. It can be science, like rocketengineering, about the cosmos, or whatever. But not an interest that makes you emotional. Shutting down the emotions before sleep is important for me. Be dispassionate before bedtime. Me and another random onlineperson had the same expirience on the writings we fell a sleep to, and we both were on sleeping pills. For some reason we never realized, suddenly we fell a sleep without them for some weeks, and woke up so rested and alert.
 

kinda

Senior Member
Jun 26, 2013
2,014
978
113
#19
If you exercise regularly, it helps with sleep. Most of us live very solitary life styles and hardly do any physical activity all day.
 
Mar 25, 2020
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#20
I still have sleep issues. I'm coping with it. All these inputs do help when I read them. It's like a phase for me. It comes and goes. I have to get ahold of my life and find enough rest to live the life I want to live. Keeping awake night time is not good for the body or the mind. Thanks again for sharing. This is very helpful.